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BOTM Winner, April 2013
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I was talking to the mechanics at the shop I use in Orlando (Cycle Pro, 407-277-5557) about pros/cons of wrapping pipes. They both strongly advised against it, saying that wrapping the pipes can lead to burned exhaust valves. They said that if you trap the heat on the header, the heat will travel back into the motor, and the first thing it hits is the exhaust valve. He said the header is designed to dissipate heat, and if you curtail that function by wrapping them, the heat will have to travel back into the motor.
I am not saying this is a scientific fact, but it does seem to make sense. Has anyone here (who has had the pipes wrapped for a long time) had any issues with damaged exhaust valves? Maybe Racnray can chime in on this subject.
For my peace of mind, I think I will just flush the coolant and add some MoCool to it and leave it at that.
 

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Mine have been wrapped for over a year and absolutely no problems. But then I knew there would not be any problems. I tell ya, to this day I still hear some of the strangest sayings from people. Even if there was any truth to what he said, these heads are water cooled and will keep them in a safe temperature. There are a lot of riders on this forum that have wrapped their pipes with great success in reducing the heat radiation.
 

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I disagree with the premise. Exhaust pipes are commonly enclosed in shields or wrapped to reduce heat transfer to the surrounding area, often by the manufacturers. The primary purpose of the pipe is to exhaust the heat and gases in a safe area. A secondary benefit comes from proper back-pressure and tuned length for more effective scavenging of burnt gases from the cylinder. If cooling was to be an important function, I would expect heavier materials with cooling fins, and air flow directed to the exposed pipes.

Now that I've flopped my jaws, I say this with no formal education in such things, but compiling things that I have read and heard over many years. In other words, I could be wrong!
 

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I think this makes sense.

I wrapped the pipes on my V and H 2 into 1 with my old classic 1500. I loved the look, but the amount of heat that is captured is intense. The theory is that the heat is supposed to flume exhaust and unburned gasses from the heads faster and more efficiently and I get that as well, but the trapped heat is insane. On the bike and it was carb (less efficient than the FI model of course) it should have yielded better results. I eventually unwwrapped the pipes and put the heat deflectors back on. The bike ran cooler, was more fun to sit on at traffic lights and performance was not inhibited. I have been reading about guys wrapping their pipes and I am surprised that on todays FI bikes this mod is necessary.


I was talking to the mechanics at the shop I use in Orlando (Cycle Pro, 407-277-5557) about pros/cons of wrapping pipes. They both strongly advised against it, saying that wrapping the pipes can lead to burned exhaust valves. They said that if you trap the heat on the header, the heat will travel back into the motor, and the first thing it hits is the exhaust valve. He said the header is designed to dissipate heat, and if you curtail that function by wrapping them, the heat will have to travel back into the motor.
I am not saying this is a scientific fact, but it does seem to make sense. Has anyone here (who has had the pipes wrapped for a long time) had any issues with damaged exhaust valves? Maybe Racnray can chime in on this subject.
For my peace of mind, I think I will just flush the coolant and add some MoCool to it and leave it at that.
 

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I disagree with the premise. Exhaust pipes are commonly enclosed in shields or wrapped to reduce heat transfer to the surrounding area, often by the manufacturers. The primary purpose of the pipe is to exhaust the heat and gases in a safe area. A secondary benefit comes from proper back-pressure and tuned length for more effective scavenging of burnt gases from the cylinder. If cooling was to be an important function, I would expect heavier materials with cooling fins, and air flow directed to the exposed pipes.

Now that I've flopped my jaws, I say this with no formal education in such things, but compiling things that I have read and heard over many years. In other words, I could be wrong!
You're not wrong Old Bear.:)
 

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BOTM Winner, April 2013
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Discussion Starter #7
You're not wrong Old Bear.:)
I would sure like to hear from someone who's has their pipes wrapped for at least 25,000 miles, and hear if they've had any problems with exhaust valves. Personally, I don't mind who wraps their pipes; they're not mine. I plan on keeping my bike for at least 10 years and 150,000 miles, so longevity and reliability are important to me. I realize that most people keep a bike for 3-5 years and 10,000 miles, so if that's the case, the long term effects won't be felt by that owner. I, on the other hand, will still be around to worry about it.
 

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I would sure like to hear from someone who's has their pipes wrapped for at least 25,000 miles, and hear if they've had any problems with exhaust valves. Personally, I don't mind who wraps their pipes; they're not mine. I plan on keeping my bike for at least 10 years and 150,000 miles, so longevity and reliability are important to me. I realize that most people keep a bike for 3-5 years and 10,000 miles, so if that's the case, the long term effects won't be felt by that owner. I, on the other hand, will still be around to worry about it.
I bet Bubba has had a bike with wrapped pipes for at lease that many miles.
He'' weigh in soon, I'm sure.
 

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Never heard of that before from any mechanic. Ray would know.... I had a scoot with 240k miles with the pipes wrapped and at 200k miles the valve adjustment and their compression pressure was still within specs... a Yamaha Venture. Plus I have had other scoots with wrapped pipes and have been around them that have been wrapped for more years than than most of you guys have been alive... but other than that I don't have any more scientific proof than those mechanics in Florida I would imagine...

Plus I have never had a pipe "burn" through or rust through.

As I said... Ray wraps pipes and I would respect his answer either way as being from an expert.
 

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hi guys, I ordered wraps and I hope its not a waste of time. I love my vaq.. and heat is the only complaint I have.. 90% of the heat is from the header pipes.. so I hope it works .
 

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hi guys, I ordered wraps and I hope its not a waste of time. I love my vaq.. and heat is the only complaint I have.. 90% of the heat is from the header pipes.. so I hope it works .

----It will----, just make sure you overlap it half the width of the wrap and use all of a 50 foot role.
 

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It will..................
 

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My first experience with wrapping pipes was waaaaay back in 1988. I built a big bore/stroker engine for a customer's CBR1000, raising displacement from1000cc to 1170cc. That skoot had a radiator sized for a stock engine, NOT for that build. To say it ran hot is an understatement!

We found out about exhaust wrapping and wrapped the pipes on that skoot. Made a HUGE difference and from that skoot forward I have been a believer and a user of exhaust wrapping..

ALL of my skoots that have recieved aftermarket exhausts have had those pipes wrapped. My Busa has had wrapped pipes since that first pipe was installed in 2000 at about 1500 mls, it now has 73,000 miles. One of the engines that was in that Busa made 197 H.P.!

The theory of improving exhaust scavenging by raising exhaust gas temp is partially tru, as we did a b4 and after dyno test on a ZX7, the wrapped pipes made 2 more H.P. with noticeably better throttle response. This was needed on this skoot to help overcome the owner's installation of "superbike" cams on his stock engine, cams that absolutley killed the power, so improving exhaust scavenging helped on this skoot.

Anyways...back to the question. I can understand the theory of what they believe may happen, but exhaust valves are made of some real tuff stuff and will no doubt withstand temperatures far above what they believe may happen. I have wrapped many exhaust systems since 1988 and have NEVER had any type of engine failure due to wrapped pipes. Another "old wives tail" is that wrapping will cause the pipes to rust sooner, and again from what I have seen that is just not true.

RACNRAY
 

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BOTM Winner, April 2013
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Discussion Starter #14
My first experience with wrapping pipes was waaaaay back in 1988. I built a big bore/stroker engine for a customer's CBR1000, raising displacement from1000cc to 1170cc. That skoot had a radiator sized for a stock engine, NOT for that build. To say it ran hot is an understatement!

We found out about exhaust wrapping and wrapped the pipes on that skoot. Made a HUGE difference and from that skoot forward I have been a believer and a user of exhaust wrapping..

ALL of my skoots that have recieved aftermarket exhausts have had those pipes wrapped. My Busa has had wrapped pipes since that first pipe was installed in 2000 at about 1500 mls, it now has 73,000 miles. One of the engines that was in that Busa made 197 H.P.!

The theory of improving exhaust scavenging by raising exhaust gas temp is partially tru, as we did a b4 and after dyno test on a ZX7, the wrapped pipes made 2 more H.P. with noticeably better throttle response. This was needed on this skoot to help overcome the owner's installation of "superbike" cams on his stock engine, cams that absolutley killed the power, so improving exhaust scavenging helped on this skoot.

Anyways...back to the question. I can understand the theory of what they believe may happen, but exhaust valves are made of some real tuff stuff and will no doubt withstand temperatures far above what they believe may happen. I have wrapped many exhaust systems since 1988 and have NEVER had any type of engine failure due to wrapped pipes. Another "old wives tail" is that wrapping will cause the pipes to rust sooner, and again from what I have seen that is just not true.

RACNRAY
Thanks for that "first-hand" real world knowledge, Ray. That's what I wanted to hear. I appreciate you sharing your knowledge and experience with this forum, as well as many other, I'm sure.
 

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My first experience with wrapping pipes was waaaaay back in 1988. I built a big bore/stroker engine for a customer's CBR1000, raising displacement from1000cc to 1170cc. That skoot had a radiator sized for a stock engine, NOT for that build. To say it ran hot is an understatement!

We found out about exhaust wrapping and wrapped the pipes on that skoot. Made a HUGE difference and from that skoot forward I have been a believer and a user of exhaust wrapping..

ALL of my skoots that have recieved aftermarket exhausts have had those pipes wrapped. My Busa has had wrapped pipes since that first pipe was installed in 2000 at about 1500 mls, it now has 73,000 miles. One of the engines that was in that Busa made 197 H.P.!

The theory of improving exhaust scavenging by raising exhaust gas temp is partially tru, as we did a b4 and after dyno test on a ZX7, the wrapped pipes made 2 more H.P. with noticeably better throttle response. This was needed on this skoot to help overcome the owner's installation of "superbike" cams on his stock engine, cams that absolutley killed the power, so improving exhaust scavenging helped on this skoot.

Anyways...back to the question. I can understand the theory of what they believe may happen, but exhaust valves are made of some real tuff stuff and will no doubt withstand temperatures far above what they believe may happen. I have wrapped many exhaust systems since 1988 and have NEVER had any type of engine failure due to wrapped pipes. Another "old wives tail" is that wrapping will cause the pipes to rust sooner, and again from what I have seen that is just not true.

RACNRAY
is there any kind of tutorial or how-to anywhere about wrapping the pipes on the voyager? Mine is a 2012 and have been waffling on wrapping for some time (even posted that I wasn't going to bother) but have now ordered the wrap. Problem is that I have zero experience doing this so want to learn before (rather than during). :)

Steve
 

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I'll see if I can find something.

This one looks good. :)

another one
And one more.:)
 

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Interesting... I noticed that in 2 of the videos they start the wrap from the top, and the guy in the second vid starts from the bottom. His explanation that it allows the air to flow over the folds makes sense to me. I guess if you wrap it tight enough it shouldn't matter, but I think from the bottom of the pipe forward is the way to go.
 

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Interesting... I noticed that in 2 of the videos they start the wrap from the top, and the guy in the second vid starts from the bottom. His explanation that it allows the air to flow over the folds makes sense to me. I guess if you wrap it tight enough it shouldn't matter, but I think from the bottom of the pipe forward is the way to go.
That might, and I mean just barely might, make a difference if you were not going to re-install the heat shields over the wrapping. The heat shields will pretty much eliminate air flow on the wrap.
 

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Ray and all.

Thanks for the info in this thread. I am a new owner of an 09 Nomad and am thinking of wrapping the pipes. This helped make my decision for me. I will be wrapping during the install of the factory heat shield.
 

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is there any kind of tutorial or how-to anywhere about wrapping the pipes on the voyager? Mine is a 2012 and have been waffling on wrapping for some time (even posted that I wasn't going to bother) but have now ordered the wrap. Problem is that I have zero experience doing this so want to learn before (rather than during). :)

Steve
Hi sgoyette,

I'm sure I broke a cardinal law or did something to make my bike blow up along the way, but I'll tell you about wrapping my 2012 Voyager.

I truly feel that the KAMS system does a great job with rider comfort; and wrapping the pipes isn't a necessary mod. But, I live in TX and we get some heat.:)

I used 15' of exhaust wrap from Pepboys. I picked up a pack of stainless steel ties there too, but I don't remember the brand or lenght.
http://www.pepboys.com/product/details/9961360/?quantity=1

I did not remove my header.
I soaked the exhaust wrap while I removed the heat shields and the hose clamps that hold them on.

Because I didn't know how much I could wrap with 15', I started at the top of the front header.
I made a complete wrap and put on a SS tie; it's very hard to cut off the excess bit of the ties.
Then I took the end of the wrap and made a couple of loops around the header and pulled the slack until the loops were near the beginning; I would pull them tight into position using no overlap. I think I used five of the SS ties.
I repeated this part down the front header and up the rear header.

Make a couple of loops the pull the slack out, tighten the loops in position.

With no overlap; I had to cut about a foot off the end.:)

You may need to look at the tabs on the heat shields to locate the hose clamps correctly. It can be a pain to get everything lined back up, just take your time.
I needed to replace two hose clamps because I damaged them trying to put them back on.

With the KAMS, my right leg would get warm, and even uncomfortable at stop lights.
Adding the wrap makes for VERY moderate warmth; even at a stop light in 100 degree heat.:)

Scott
 
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