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Don't know where your at but down here winterizing your bike means riding in temps under 50 degrees. :]
 

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Upstate NY. I wish that's how it was here. Ridding in the winter here means ridding in 3ft of snow and below 20 lol. I was wondering if I just started it every 2 or 3 days and let it run for 10 or 15 minutes if that would be enough, but I saw a video that said don't keep it in your garage if it isn't heated. It isn't, so I was looking for the right way to winterize it and put it in my house. I have a split level ranch and my garage is attached. I can just roll it right in the door.
 

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There is a dedicated section on 'Storage' in my owner's manual. I imagine your manual does too. It's a good resource but some of the items are a little overkill or just personal preference, IMO.

Personally, I would:
change the crankcase oil
add fuel stabilizer and run for 5-10 min to run through fuel system
remove battery, store indoors and recharge once a month
fog down cylinders
overinflate tires to avoid flat spots
store indoors or under heavy cover
 

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Change the oil and oil filter, add stabilizer to full tank of fresh fuel, plug into a good quality battery maintainer (not a battery charger), clean it, put the cover on and leave it alone until the next riding season. Do not start it unless you can run it to full operating temp if you just start it every once in a while all that dose is cause condensation to develop in the crankcase and exhaust. I also put mine in a wheel chock or put blocks under the frame to hold it upright. After that thats when the hard part starts putting up with PMS (parked motorcycle syndrome) damn I hate winters in Iowa
 

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You're getting some good info. I'll break down the "why".

Fuel stabilizer (sta-bil, Seafoam) is essential when storing the bike for more than a couple of weeks as certain components in the fuel will evaporate leaving behind stale fuel that can clog up injectors and cause other issues. In addition to what's said above, TOP IT OFF. Store the tank completely full. This is to prevent corrosion inside the fuel tank. A good fuel stabilizer should also deal with moisture that builds up in the fuel.

Changing the oil before storage is helpful because engine oil that's been run will have combustion by-products that contribute to corrosion and internal wear.

Keeping the bike on a battery tender is also important. When a lead acid battery (and yes, this includes 'sealed' batteries, AGM batteries, "gel" batteries and all of the various other names; these are STILL lead acid batteries) drops below 12.4v (2.05~2.07v per cell) internal corrosion begins. This is just as true for "gel", sealed lead acid, AGM, flooded lead acid, and all of the various types of lead acid batteries. The only exception to this rule is certain, very expensive, lithium aftermarket batteries. Keeping the battery above 12.4v will prolong it's life. A good, automatic tender left on during winter storage will keep the battery going for years and years.

Tire inflation is important, as mentioned above, to prevent dry-rotting and flat spots. Personally, I run the sidewall max pressure during storage and check periodically.

Some people like covers but when storing inside, I don't. Covers are were rodents, insects, and other nastiness can find shelter. My bike is stored in the garage without a cover. Occasionally using a waterless wash or detailing spray to get rid of dust can be helpful.

WASH and WAX the bike before storage, and get it really clean. Getting rid of combustion by products, pollution, bug guts, etc., will protect the clearcoat. Bonus points for clay-barring or using a product such as Tar-X to get rid of brake dust and heavy metals that are practically invisible and don't come off with washing; but can eat at paint over time. This is the sort of maintenance that will prevent clearcoat failure down the road. Don't let anyone tell you that clearcoat replaces wax. Wax protects clearcoat just like it protected the old single stage paint. Getting it clean also means getting grease and grime out of every nook and cranny which can cause corrosion over time if neglected.

Like mentioned above, don't start it if you aren't going to ride it. Here in MO, we don't get the 3ft of snow. So I still ride in the winter, but it might be two or three or even four weeks in between 'rides' during cold snaps, or when there's a ton of salt and cinders on the road. (I ride a lot more in winters where we don't get any snow so there's never any salt on the road. I generally don't ride on salty roads; that's a recipe for corrosion). But when I ride in the winter, I always top off the tank before pulling into the garage and add fuel stabilizer.

If your storage is outdoors, or in an un-attached building where critters are present, stuff some rags in the exhaust pipes to prevent critters from building nests in your exhaust.

Like mentioned above, fogging oil in the cylinders can be helpful. Especially for longer term (3 months +) storage. That'll prevent corrosion in the cylinders. What can happen with frequently stored bikes is that condensation can form (ESPECIALLY bikes where a guy fires it up throughout the winter and lets it idle, inviting all sorts of moisture once it cools back down) and surface rust forms inside the cylinder; especially if the choice of engine oil doesn't have good clinging properties (conventional oil, diesel engine oil, etc.) and so it doesn't stick to the cylinder walls as long when cold. The effect is similar to disc brakes on a car after washing; the rapid rusting that occurs. Then in the spring, the bike is fired up and the rust is worn off, but not without first acting like sandpaper accelerating wear briefly. This is a cumulative effect that'll cause premature wear to components like cylinder walls and rings.

Proper storage can significantly prolong the life of your motorcycle and prevent you from spending your spring waiting on an overloaded shop somewhere to figure out why it wouldn't start come April! My local dealer is always CRAMMED until about June, mostly with carbed bikes, that were just put away in the winter and mysteriously wouldn't start the next year. Everything from clogged carbs to things as serious as rusted and siezed engines.
 

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Sheeesh, thank goodness I live in FL. Winterizimg here means prepare for some serious riding. Its hot as hell here right now. Winter for us is 75 degrees and no rain. I cant wait till December.
 

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Sheeesh, thank goodness I live in FL. Winterizimg here means prepare for some serious riding. Its hot as hell here right now. Winter for us is 75 degrees and no rain. I cant wait till December.
Winterize in Georgia means waiting 3 days or less for snow and ice to clear or wait a couple of days for the temps to get back up above 10° F. That was with a Honda Sabre. With the Voyager, I may be able to handle single digit temps :smile2:
 

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Sorry snowdawgs but riding season starts about a month away for us southern riders. That is about the time y'all will be putting yours away for the winter. Romans5/8 has some good ways to put your bike to sleep in post #6
 

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All about the salt and cinders for me. I don't ride as much, but I'll go out during the warm part of the day with plenty of warm clothes just to scratch the itch. But if it snows or if the weatherman says it's gonna snow, then the road is covered in a corrosive mix of cinders and salt and I just don't want to subject my bike to that; it's not worth it. After a good rain (we ARE south enough to still have rain in the winter; it doesn't just snow), the roads are fine again. Some winters, like last winter, that rain didn't really come until Spring. A couple winters ago, it didn't snow once (not enough to accumulate anyway) and so the roads were always clear, and I rode most of the winter except for a couple of snaps where it plunged down to a high of 20 or lower.

Generally, 50F is my "comfortable" temp, or anything above (I've never ridden in "too hot" weather; as long as I've kept moving). 40F is my "I can ride all day as long as I wear the right clothes" temp and 30F or below is my "If I have a good reason, and it's not too far" temp. If I had heated gear, below 40F would be more doable, but I don't, and even with plenty of layers the cold creeps down.
 

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Chaps are good to for the cold, especially when worn with pants.....................man that was one cold ride.
 

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I wonder if it's possible for someone to mention winter without the warm climate folks coming out to sneer at the northern folks. Every stinking time! Ha!

Thankfully, our winters are short. 9 months of good riding is not bad, with plenty of riding mixed into the other three months. Though I am envious of an all-year-riding climate. Though perhaps not the brutal heat and humidity and bird-sized-bugs of places like southern Florida.
 

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Winterizing my bikes in the DC area. I have a garage so...

That means plugging in the battery tender.....that's about it.
I might put stabil it...if I remember.
Start the bikes once a month...if I remember.

Regardless of what I do, I have never had any issues with fuel, oil or anything else. My bikes start up every time. If the weather is tolerable, I will ride my bikes around my complex a few times during the winter.

If the weather is still decent (above 45) I will ride. I have heated gear if I need it.
 

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You aren't doing yourself any favors by starting it just to start it; best to leave it on the tender unless you're going to ride it.

Lots of people don't have problems without using fuel stabilizers, until they do. My local dealer has two huge signs to that effect right by the service department. The service manager once told me his most common complaint was "But I never use fuel stabilizer and I've been doing it that way for years!" Until it DOESN'T work and they have an expensive carb rebuild or a VERY expensive fuel injector / fuel pump repair (which generally just involves replacing those parts).

Fuel still varnishes in a fuel injected bike but the high-pressure nature of the fuel system means most of it just gets blown out when the bike is first started up (just like, much of the time, an aerosol can of carb cleaner will blow varnish out of a carb). Until the one time it DOESN'T and an injector or the fuel pump is ruined.

It's your bike, of course, but I would REALLY suggest you make sure to use Sta-Bil or seafoam during longer-term storage.
 

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I haven't had in issue in 15+ years not using stab-bil but also there have been many mild winters here where I rode the bike. Currently I try to ride regularly until Jan 2 and give up when heated gear doesn't help...LOL

I know just starting and letting run isn't great, especially with my HDs. I usually try to ride around my complex so I can shift gears and get a load on the system a bit.

Like you said it is my bike and I can do what I want. A gentle push from other always helps :)

The more I think about it, I may have put Sta-Bil in my bikes last Dec or Jan.
 

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Here in NE Nebraska I try to ride all winter long, but there have been times when (even though the highways are clear and the temps are tolerable) I can't get the bike from the house, across the snow-packed and/or icy streets to clear road. Usually the interval is less than a couple of weeks but last winter I had to go for 37 days before I could get the bike out and even that was tricky. I always use a battery minder/tender/maintainer and put Sta-bil in at the recommended storage concentration JUST IN CASE. So far, so good.
 
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