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Hi Everyone,

Its getting close for me to put my baby away for the winter :(

I've read a lot of info on what to do to winterize the bike.

Just would like to hear what some other people do (and no smart a$$ comments from you lucky people in warm places who don't have too :D )

Thanks
N
 

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WINTERIZE!!!! I just checked the average weather in Oshkosh. You can make it at least until Halloween. Sorry, does this constitue a smart ass comment? :D

Seriously...
Add fuel stabilizer and top off your tank with fuel.

Some people also recommend fogging the carburetor like you would on a boat. This is done by removing the airbox cover, starting the engine and spraying the fogging agent into the carb intakes until she chokes off.

Attach a Battery Tender so she will crank when you want her to.

Kiss her goodnight and cover with something to keep the dust off.

Dream of warm days and long rides all winter.
 

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Block it up so you don't get flats on the tires. You might clean and wax it good too, leave gooey traps around it so the mice don't climb up and nest in it (heard of that more than once)

I'm sorry, my version of winterizing is just adding the Chaps to the engine guards, raising the window and adding the control unit for the electric gloves. I'm down in KC though, an average winter is between 20-40 with occasional colder bursts.
 

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Hi Everyone,

Its getting close for me to put my baby away for the winter :(

I've read a lot of info on what to do to winterize the bike.

Just would like to hear what some other people do (and no smart a$$ comments from you lucky people in warm places who don't have too :D )

Thanks
N
Fellow cheesehead: Best "winterizing tip" I know is to move south where you can ride all year :D
 

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Hi N,

I hear you loud an clear. I figure maybe three more weeks here on the East Cost of Canada (Nova Scotia) and that will be it. I usually end the season after the first week in November.

Anyway, I normally top up the bike with gas. I also start adding fuel stabilizer this time of the year with every fill up. That way gas, with stabilizer well mix in, is in the fuel injectors an will hopefully prevent them from gumming up. If you wait until your last tank, the gas in the injectors will have no or very little fuel stabilizer in them. I normally also pump a few more pounds of air into the tires to keep them from flat footing and rotate them a few times during the winter for the same reason. I charge the battery once during the winter and once before putting it away if I didn't have a chance to ride for a longer trip just before putting the bike away. I leave the battery in the cold, since this is how they least discharge. Of course the battery has to be charge well and be good otherwise.

I also use Rust Check oil or WD40 around the frame where the welds and hard to clean places are to prevent rust from starting, since I don't have a heated garage and the temperature change from above freezing to below almost daily around here. This causes lots of condensation on the metal of the bike :mad:.

Now here is where I post my question to you all. The owners manual for the Vulcan actually calls for the fuel to be drained and the bike be run until all fuel is gone out of the injectors i.e. the bike stalls. I have never done this before, because I keep the fuel in the tank to prevent it from rusting. My Kawasaki Versys manual said the opposite too. What are your thoughts on this? :confused:

I also believe I read in the manual to "lower" the air pressure, which seems even more bizarre since this would surely lead to flat footed tires. :eek:

Hope this helps

Cheers

Chris
 

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Am very surprised no one mentioned seafoam yet.
I personally don't do anything to mine. It seems like every time I add unessesary stuff to my vehicles it backfires on me. I don't use the battery tender but maybe once a month and maybe once a month I turn it on for about 10 minutes or so. I usually park my bike in late december till late february.
 

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Had to do it....Just put the liner in the jacket and throw on the chaps, got to get a set of chaps for the new engine guard (maybe that will be my Christmas present to the bike)! :)
 

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What about those heated jackets and gloves? Once in a while taking it out in the extreme can do more for the bike than all the procedures. No?
 

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Personally, as I make my living in a hockey rink, I am better acclimated to cold than many. So, I don't actually "winterize" the bike. Weather usually blesses us with a good day every few weeks, so I do ride occassionaly all winter.

I do start using Stabil about mid-November, as the E-10 crap is only stable for about three weeks.

But, I do have winterize my water toys, and have learned a great deal from the JetSki, and outboard motor sites.

As that info relates to bikes, I would pass on the following information. The E-10 gas, and the water it attracts does have a bad effect on the metal tanks. (it's worse on white/clear plastic, and destroys fibreglass tanks). Hence, the manual suggestion to drain the tanks. Seafoam is a fine fuel treatment while engine is use, not as great a stabilizer, based on reports from metal tank people.

That said, I don't drain, as I use the bike. But, running it for a couple of hours, every couple of weeks, doesn't use all the fuel, or change the fact it's also sitting for a few weeks. So, a fll tank and in "Stabil I trust" is all I got.

BTW, wd40 does not leave any protection behind. It eliminates water, yes. But, if you want a protective film, it doesn't do it. CRC makes some anti-corrosion products. But, some leave a yellowish film, that stinks as it partially cooks off. The yellow doesn't all go away. So, be careful and get the numbered one, not the highest rated one.

Gotta go to work, try and add more later.
 

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What about those heated jackets and gloves? Once in a while taking it out in the extreme can do more for the bike than all the procedures. No?
I wouldn't do that if you can't at least ride for a good stretch. For one, if you only run the engine for a few minutes then all you do is put condensation in the engine and exhaust system. The motor won't warm up enough to burn off any water vapor. Second, you are also not charging your battery enough that way. When idling in the cold the current drawn from it (lights) is more then what the alternator is charging back.

Chris
 

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BTW, wd40 does not leave any protection behind. It eliminates water, yes. But, if you want a protective film, it doesn't do it. CRC makes some anti-corrosion products. But, some leave a yellowish film, that stinks as it partially cooks off. The yellow doesn't all go away. So, be careful and get the numbered one, not the highest rated one.

Gotta go to work, try and add more later.
I know WD40 isn't the best product, that's why I use the red "Rust Check" oil. It is used to undercoat cars. Has very good properties for sticking to metal. They usually sell tow different types of this rust treatment stuff. The more liquid one (red can for Rust Check) and the sticky gooey on you described (green can for Rust Check), which is yellow and a lot thicker when it comes out. That stuff does tend to leave a almost grease like residue.

Chris
 

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1. Put Stabil in the tank.
2. Change oil and filter.
3. Fill the tank max-ful at the station 1 mile away.
4. Ride it home to get Stabil-ed gas into everything and "rinse" the engine innards with clean oil.
5. Park and cover in unheated shed.
6. Start and run it for about five minutes once a month.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
WINTERIZE!!!! I just checked the average weather in Oshkosh. You can make it at least until Halloween. Sorry, does this constitue a smart ass comment? :D

.
Ha i am hoping to get to Halloween atleast. We have been lucky and got a string of real warm weather lately, went out today in just long sleeves.

Thanks everyone for the comments and tips, much appreciated!
 

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WINTERIZE!!!! I just checked the average weather in Oshkosh. You can make it at least until Halloween. Sorry, does this constitue a smart ass comment? :D

Seriously...
Add fuel stabilizer and top off your tank with fuel.

Some people also recommend fogging the carburetor like you would on a boat. This is done by removing the airbox cover, starting the engine and spraying the fogging agent into the carb intakes until she chokes off.

Attach a Battery Tender so she will crank when you want her to.

Kiss her goodnight and cover with something to keep the dust off.

Dream of warm days and long rides all winter.
Exactly what i'm gonna do! If you have a gas station that sell gas with no ethanol that what I'll fill up with. Just a little more insurance.
 

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I have had good success with the following for several items I had or still own. A 1975 boat with a inboard 4 cylinder chevy motor that I sold last year, 3 watercrafts and lawnmower. Should work for a motorcycle. Run Seafoam in gas tank, and fill it up full. Change oil and filter so it sits with fresh oil over the winter. I have always heard the acids and by products from used oil is not good to leave in there. Fog the carburator with foggin oil. Pull the spark plugs and spray fogging oil in the cylinders and crank for a few seconds to coat everything. Reinstall plugs, battery I charged for a little while once a month. I guess the 34 year old boat tells you something must have worked. Good luck with what ever you decide.
 

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Winterizing my bike

Last year was my first one owning a bike ever.
Looked at all the tips for putting it up for the winter and ultimately here's what I wound up doing.
1. Filling up the gas tank and adding stabil to it as the weather got into the 40's.
2. Riding around on it to get the stabil into the lines and everywhere gas goes.
3. Cleaning it up, waxing it and shining up the shiny parts
4. Jacked it up so both wheels were off the ground.
5. Let some of the air out of the tires.
6. hooking up the battery tender - I use an optimate 3+
7. covered the muffler openings with plastic bags (cold bike of course)
8. hung a some moth balls in old pantyhose from the highway bar, passenger footpegs and threw a couple into the saddlebags too. (supposedly keeps critters and bugs away - seems to work pretty good) and once step 9 is done -everything underneath the cover will reek of them in short order)
9. pulled the cover over the whole shebang.
10. said a few words to comfort her (and me too!).
11. eyeballed the battery tender every couple wks.

In the spring - take the cover off, and take off the mothballs and let it air out. (don't forget the ones in the saddlebags) - outside of the smell which goes away fairly quickly). pull the bags off the mufflers and put some air in the tires.
Gave her the safety checks, lit her up and I was pretty much on the road again...
 

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Finally put mine away for the season yesterday. Changed the oil, and I also finally figured out to use the actual oil drain plug on the bottom of the oil pan. I had been using the side plug that holds the filter screen all this time, but it sure is not as easily accessible as the drain plug. I got into that habit of using the side drain from my old 750. Live and learn.

But with the oil and filter changed out, it's back in the storage shed for at least four months now. Will still pull the battery and bring it inside to keep it from freezing hard, and keep the Battery Tender on it periodically. Last year I even removed the saddlebags to keep them from freezing and becoming brittle. Don't know if that actually did any good or not. We had good some freezing rain/ice overnight so it's nice to have the bike safely tucked away now and have room to actually put my car in the garage again for the rest of the winter.
 

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I can't understand why you think the bottom plug is easier then the side plug. Oh, I know there's a trick to getting the nut off the engine between the frame, but you don't have to do that to drain the oil, just to check the filter. To just drain the oil you only need to open it up a quarter inch or so and the design of the plug will let the oil drain out. As it's on the low side when on the kickstand it drains the oil completely without having to set the bike level.

Last year was a bad winter for me. I think it snowed Thanksgiving day and kept snowing until February 19th when I had Rotator cup surgery. So I barely could ride all winter and then I had a month and a half where I couldn't ride at all. That's when I hooked a battery tender to my battery but such a short time of sitting I didn't worry about getting it up off the wheels.

KC is normally not a bad place to be during the winter and we have many of them with little to no snow. It goes in cycles along with the solar cycle. It was snowy when I was in Salina at school in the early 80's. It started to snow again a couple years after I got out of school again in the early to mid 90's. It picked up again several years ago, when I bought my bike. We'll have years of little snow and warmer temps coming in the next couple years.

Little comfort to those of you north of me who get snow regardless.
 
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