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Discussion Starter #1
I did a quick search, but couldn't find the gear ratios on the Vulcan 900 Classic LT. Does anyone know what they are?

Thanks
 

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I did a quick search, but couldn't find the gear ratios on the Vulcan 900 Classic LT. Does anyone know what they are?

Thanks
Specs from Kawasaki Service manual

Gear ratios:
1st ~ 2.786 (39/14)
2nd ~ 1.889 (34/18)
3rd ~ 1.360 (34/25)
4th ~ 1.107 (31/28)
5th ~ 0.963 (26/27)

Hope this helps.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Specs from Kawasaki Service manual

Gear ratios:
1st ~ 2.786 (39/14)
2nd ~ 1.889 (34/18)
3rd ~ 1.360 (34/25)
4th ~ 1.107 (31/28)
5th ~ 0.963 (26/27)

Hope this helps.
Thanks for the info, but now I'm REALLY confused. You see, I did some research on the Harley Sportster 883 cc which is really close in engine size to the Vulcan 900 although the Sportster is about 100 pounds lighter.

Anyway, what I found for the 883 Sportster is that the gear ratios are as follows:

1st = 10.78
2nd = 7.70
3rd = 5.73
4th = 4.75
5th = 4.07

When I searched for the gear ratios of the bigger, heavier Harleys, the gear ratios were slightly different, but not greatly so. So this really leaves me confused. I'm sure that the gear ratios on the Vulcan 900 couldn't be all THAT different. Based on what I've read, I would expect the 900 to have a first gear ratio of about 11.40 and a fifth gear ratio of about 4.60 or somewhere in that ballpark. Can anyone explain this confusing situation?

Thanks.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
But, all those ratios come after the primary reduction ratio of 2.184/1
Hmmm, so if I multiplied all the numbers that Bosco provided by 2.184 that would give me a first gear ratio of 6.08 and a fifth gear ratio of 2.10 which would be closer to what the Harley numbers are, but still not close enough to be a direct comparison, IMO. Something is still missing but I'm not sure what.

Thanks for the info.
 

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If ya want to know what the 900 is like find one and hop on it and try it out. That is the only way to tell if ya like a bike or not. a 883 sportsturd (no offense intended, just don't like the sporties) sits differently than the 900 Classic LT that you mentioned in the title of the post.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
If ya want to know what the 900 is like find one and hop on it and try it out. That is the only way to tell if ya like a bike or not. a 883 sportsturd (no offense intended, just don't like the sporties) sits differently than the 900 Classic LT that you mentioned in the title of the post.
There's no question that the 900 Classic LT sits differently from a 883 Sportster, but relatively small differences in gear ratios can make a noticeable difference in acceleration as well as rpms turned while cruising at highway speed. That's why I was wanting to know the gear ratios of the 900 Classic LT.
 

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There's no question that the 900 Classic LT sits differently from a 883 Sportster, but relatively small differences in gear ratios can make a noticeable difference in acceleration as well as rpms turned while cruising at highway speed. That's why I was wanting to know the gear ratios of the 900 Classic LT.
This might be more useful: http://www.gearingcommander.com if you haven't seen it before. I'm not going to do all of the work for you but here is a quick peek:
883 @ 70mph: 3750 rpm
1200 @ 70mph: 3250 rpm
900 @ 70mph: 4100 rpm (stock)
900 @ 70mph: 3900 rpm (with 200 rear tire or 34 tooth front pulley)
 

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Discussion Starter #9 (Edited)
This might be more useful: http://www.gearingcommander.com if you haven't seen it before. I'm not going to do all of the work for you but here is a quick peek:
883 @ 70mph: 3750 rpm
1200 @ 70mph: 3250 rpm
900 @ 70mph: 4100 rpm (stock)
900 @ 70mph: 3900 rpm (with 200 rear tire or 34 tooth front pulley)

Graybush,

Yes, that's VERY helpful. Thanks.

I know that the gearing on the 1200 Sportster is about 15.6% higher than on the 883 Sportster and this correlates very closely with the RPM's you've listed above.

From this, I can determine that the 900 Classic LT is about 9.3% LOWER than the 883 Sportster. This means that the 900 Classic LT(stock) would have approximately the following gear ratios:

1st = 11.78
2nd = 8.42
3rd = 6.26
4th = 5.19
5th = 4.45

These numbers may not be exact, but I'm sure they are pretty close.

Thanks again for the info.
 

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Another thing to keep in mind, the speedometer error on the bikes. Most Harleys are fairly close to accurate. My 900 Vulcan was 10% fast. That meant I had to be going 77 by the speedometer to be really going 70mph. When I put the 34 tooth front pulley on it helped correct the speedometer by 6%, leaving it still 4% fast. That left it having to show about 73mph to be going 70. It is a common problem with Jap motorcycles. Even my goldwing is 8% fast.
 

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I am trying to decide if the rear pulley is worth the money, and time to install. I am figuring that by adding the rear pulley modification, (I already have the front one) I am only reducing RPM's by a total of 500? Is this correct, and if so, I find it a little hard to see how that will be that noticeable.

Perhaps what I am looking for is more power? If so, would pipes and an intake do that? (I already installed a power commander).

I guess my main concern is, if I spend all this time and money on upgrades, am I going to be happy or should I just buy a bigger bike?
 

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If you are indeed reducing the RPM by 500 at cruising speed, it will definitely be noticeable. My 900 does ~4000-4100 rpm at 70 mph, which is just beginning to get uncomfortable in the vibration department. ~3500, by contrast, is 60 mph and is perfectly smooth. You'd be basically bumping that smoothness up another 10 mph, at the expense of some acceleration and perhaps increase your MPG at the same time.
 
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