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I changed out my exhaust and air intake on my 900 around mid-October. I also added the Fi 2000 Powr Pro tuner. I changed the exhaust first and did the air intake and fuel injection tuner a week later.

After I did the air intake and fuel tuner mods, I noticed traces of water on the garage floor from my exhaust when I start the bike. I didn’t notice water coming from the exhaust the previous week when I’d only changed out the exhaust and I never noticed water coming from the stock exhaust when I started the bike.

I’ve only had the bike since late April when the weather was warm and I wonder if it’s a coincidence that I’m now seeing water due to condensation from the temperature changes starting in mid-October, or if it's a more serious issue. I’d appreciate any input that you guys and gals can provide. Thanks.
 

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That is normal. It is just condensation coming from the exhaust system as it warms up. Watch a few cars at the station next time your there and you will see this on almost all the cars. The cold pipes pick up and condense water as they get hot.
 

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The cold pipes pick up and condense water as they get hot.
How do they "pick up" water? From where? And, I thought that condensation was a function of cooling, not heating . . . would you mind breaking this down for us?
 

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When your bike is in a cold environment the metal parts are very cold and will pick up moisture from the air in and around these parts then when you are heating up the parts while it is running the moisture is condensed into water. Basic science class stuff. I can go out to my garage right now and see water droplets all over the engine and metal parts on my bike just from it being very cold then the air temp rises on a warm day and that is where this water comes from condensation. It happens inside the bike and outside it also. I have an aluminum framed window in my bathroom and when someone takes a shower on a 20 degree day the cold aluminum collects the moisture then you see water dripping inside off the aluminum frame therefore condensation.

From your local Mr. Wizard 101 class for today!!!:D:D:D
 

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When your bike is in a cold environment the metal parts are very cold and will pick up moisture from the air in and around these parts then when you are heating up the parts while it is running the moisture is condensed into water. Basic science class stuff. I can go out to my garage right now and see water droplets all over the engine and metal parts on my bike just from it being very cold then the air temp rises on a warm day and that is where this water comes from condensation. It happens inside the bike and outside it also. I have an aluminum framed window in my bathroom and when someone takes a shower on a 20 degree day the cold aluminum collects the moisture then you see water dripping inside off the aluminum frame therefore condensation.

From your local Mr. Wizard 101 class for today!!!:D:D:D
Believe me, I understand the "basic science stuff", but I'm asking where the pipes "pick up this moisture" (assuming that the OP means that water is leaking from the exhaust, and not from condensation on the OUTSIDE of the exhaust, which would render your science lesson terribly incorrect). LOL - that just didn't make any sense to me. I agree that it's moisture from the exhaust - probably from the combustion process and the bike's fuel/air mixture after start-up.

I've noticed it a lot on my 900, but never on any of the other bike's that I've had.
 

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Water vapor is a by-product of the combustion process. Some of it will collect and drip out the end of the tail pipe. If it smells like anti freeze, THEN you have a problem.
 

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Water vapor is a by-product of the combustion process. Some of it will collect and drip out the end of the tail pipe. If it smells like anti freeze, THEN you have a problem.
Now, That is completely accurate, and much better!
 

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You must be somewhat brain dead if you think I am wrong. Water vapor can come from inside the exhaust as on the outside too. I am done in this thread as it is like trying to explain something to my 8 year old grandson. Combustion is not the only place the vapor comes from it is mostly from the moisture that comes from the metal getting warm and causing evaporation then steam as it gets hotter. Frustrating when you have to try and explain everything about the small stuff. Just ride the damn thing and enjoy it till it blows up then.
 

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You must be somewhat brain dead if you think I am wrong. Water vapor can come from inside the exhaust as on the outside too. I am done in this thread as it is like trying to explain something to my 8 year old grandson. Combustion is not the only place the vapor comes from it is mostly from the moisture that comes from the metal getting warm and causing evaporation then steam as it gets hotter. Frustrating when you have to try and explain everything about the small stuff. Just ride the damn thing and enjoy it till it blows up then.
Guess I am not the only one on here she irritates.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Thanks all, I suspected it wasn't anything too serious and probably condensation or a combustion byproduct. It's interesting because I didn't notice it until after I replaced the air intake and added a fuel tuner. I've seen water dripping from the exhaust on a few cars in the past, but I never seen it on my vehicles or the bike until recently. Thanks again.
 

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You must be somewhat brain dead if you think I am wrong. Water vapor can come from inside the exhaust as on the outside too. I am done in this thread as it is like trying to explain something to my 8 year old grandson. Combustion is not the only place the vapor comes from it is mostly from the moisture that comes from the metal getting warm and causing evaporation then steam as it gets hotter. Frustrating when you have to try and explain everything about the small stuff. Just ride the damn thing and enjoy it till it blows up then.
I understand the urge to throw out insults when you're having trouble explaining incoherent posts, but that was rather rude, wasn't it?

Now, you're saying that the pipes are getting hot enough to evaporate water, but still cool enough to cause this water to condense? Please, explain how this is possible.
 

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Water from the pipes .... damn, I'm seeing steam from the ears ... LOL :D:D
 

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How do they "pick up" water? From where? And, I thought that condensation was a function of cooling, not heating . . . would you mind breaking this down for us?

Yes, and no. try walking into a warm house with glasses on after being outside in the cold. As cold air meets warm air, it excites the water molecules in the air. wherever it meets a cold surface, it deposits its moisture. It's the same reason the mirrors in your bathroom fog up. :D So the air has to be heated first, release the moisture and have a cooler surface to collect on.
 

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Check your coolant level periodically. If you're using coolant then it's bound to go down, right?

But, as I can't fathom any way in which you could leak un-evaporated coolant from the exhaust (it would either have to leak into the combustion chamber or leak through some funky crack right to the exhaust port; in both situations there's a LOT of heat, even when the engine is 'cold' ), I'm having to go with the condensation theory on this one.
 

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far from it shep !
When a guy says "You must be brain dead..." if you question him seems a bit rude to me as well regardless if she irritates you or not. You might think about what it is that irritates you so much about her posts and if you can't get over it, just don't read them! When I see like remarks from others pulling our chain I don't see you folks coming unglued over them... Take a deep breath and relax.

WEG
 

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Yes, and no. try walking into a warm house with glasses on after being outside in the cold. As cold air meets warm air, it excites the water molecules in the air. wherever it meets a cold surface, it deposits its moisture. It's the same reason the mirrors in your bathroom fog up. :D So the air has to be heated first, release the moisture and have a cooler surface to collect on.
Well, I understand the evaporation and condensation completely. LOL. Oh, Nevermind. Yes, OP. Your bike is evaporating and then condensing the water. That's the answer! You should put a marble in in, and use a resistor!

Much easier. LMAO!

FYI, go and put a put on the stove. Heat it until it's about 180-100 degrees. Heck heat it until it's 300 degrees. Now, take it off the stove and walk outside with it. Regardless of how cold it is outside, I don't think you're gonna get condensation.
 

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Well, I understand the evaporation and condensation completely. LOL. Oh, Nevermind. Yes, OP. Your bike is evaporating and then condensing the water. That's the answer! You should put a marble in in, and use a resistor!

Much easier. LMAO!

FYI, go and put a put on the stove. Heat it until it's about 180-100 degrees. Heck heat it until it's 300 degrees. Now, take it off the stove and walk outside with it. Regardless of how cold it is outside, I don't think you're gonna get condensation.
Well, here's a site that makes good sense, and basically tells us we're all wrong! LOL Basically, it's a byproduct of combustion.

http://physics.stackexchange.com/questions/99113/why-is-there-water-coming-out-of-a-car-s-tail-pipe

I actually don't mind being wrong. I learn something, and whenever I admit being wrong it makes my wife happy!
 
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