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Thanks, that makes sense. As I write this our first winter storm started, a ton of wind-driven snow is covering the ground and the temperature dropped 20 degrees. All of a sudden repairing the bike doesn't seem as urgent, I may wait till spring :)
 

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Just kicking in my .02c.
45,000 miles and the 900 needed the stator. It all started with a sudden dead battery. So I got a new Battery.
It showed 12v with the bike shut off, 12v running at idle, and still 12v at a higher RPM.

Thanks to the forums, knew exactly what that meant. New stator & regulator from Ricks.
(the stator gasket is back-ordered til November)

The shop found the gasket on Ebay, and about 2 hours labor...

pocket is now missing $525 for all 4 parts, battery, stator, voltage regulator and some labor
 

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Hey folks,
Just tested my stator (3 white wires and meter at AV) and got below:

Idle 20-25 V all combinations
Around 3-4000 rpm 45-50 all combinations

I have a tacho/voltmeter installed and it shows ~14V or above at idle but fluctuates around 13.5V at cruising speed according to my el cheapo gauge .
The machine is a 2007 Classic with 35000 kms and in pristine overall condition!
I have a GPS tracker that will drain the battery if bike not used for a week especially when it is cold and the alarm is armed but nothing else power taxing on it.
 

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Sounds like your stator and charging system are in good working order. Those voltages are normal. Voltage drops at higher RPM because the fuel injection and ignition systems draw more power. So are you actually describing a battery dying problem?
 

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Sounds like your stator and charging system are in good working order. Those voltages are normal. Voltage drops at higher RPM because the fuel injection and ignition systems draw more power. So are you actually describing a battery dying problem?
Thanks for your reply, I just wanted to verify my impression that the charging system works as it should.
I have replaced the battery with a YTX14BS to support the alarm.
 

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Hey folks,
Just tested my stator (3 white wires and meter at AV) and got below:

Idle 20-25 V all combinations
Around 3-4000 rpm 45-50 all combinations

I have a tacho/voltmeter installed and it shows ~14V or above at idle but fluctuates around 13.5V at cruising speed according to my el cheapo gauge .
The machine is a 2007 Classic with 35000 kms and in pristine overall condition!
I have a GPS tracker that will drain the battery if bike not used for a week especially when it is cold and the alarm is armed but nothing else power taxing on it.
Maybe rewire the GPS so it's only on when the bike is running and not on all the time. Or install simply time that allows it to stay connected for a short period after the bike is switched off.
 

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Well it is a GPS tracker-alarm not a GPS system so if I leave it on its own small battery it will lose its usefulness. The internal battery lasts only about four hours.
 

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Hi all

Long time but inactive member.

I had to replace the stator on my old '09 and a month later wrote the bike off (hit something on road that broke my engine case)

Bought a 08 LT and rode all last year care free. Couple challenges starting bike in fall and put it away in storage with batter tender. Winter takes a long time to bugger off up here so just got my bike last weekend. Fired up good and took it for a ride. 20 mins later stopped for gas and bike wouldn't restart. (Grrrrr)

I am not very mechanical (but super good-looking) and put a multimeter on it. Here's the results:

At rest 13.1
After starting - 12.84
Few mins later -12.47
maybe 10 mins later - 12.26

So I feel like the battery is good and these results point to a bad stator again.

Thoughts from smarter people?

Thanks,
 

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Hi all

Long time but inactive member.

I had to replace the stator on my old '09 and a month later wrote the bike off (hit something on road that broke my engine case)

Bought a 08 LT and rode all last year care free. Couple challenges starting bike in fall and put it away in storage with batter tender. Winter takes a long time to bugger off up here so just got my bike last weekend. Fired up good and took it for a ride. 20 mins later stopped for gas and bike wouldn't restart. (Grrrrr)

I am not very mechanical (but super good-looking) and put a multimeter on it. Here's the results:

At rest 13.1
After starting - 12.84
Few mins later -12.47
maybe 10 mins later - 12.26

So I feel like the battery is good and these results point to a bad stator again.

Thoughts from smarter people?

Thanks,
I assume your voltage readings were taken at the battery terminals. That would be the right way to check the overall charging system. And were those progressively lower voltages while your bike was running? If so that would indicate something in the charging system is not performing properly. The lower voltages while it was running is because the fuel injection system as well as the ignition system use power while it's running. And the progressively lower voltages would make sense because the longer your bike runs the more it drains the battery if the charging system is not functioning properly.

The next simplest thing for you to do in order to pinpoint where the problem is would be to disconnect the regulator/rectifier plug. With that disconnected you can use your multimeter to test leg 1 2 and 3 of your stator in the plug itself.
 

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I'm sorry the quality of that screenshot from a pdf is terrible. I'll try to get a better pic to post the manual instructions for testing the stator output voltages at the connector. Otherwise I'll just explain it myself.
 

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Charging System
• To check the alternator output voltage, do the following procedures.
○Remove the regulator/rectifier shield and disconnect the connector.
○Set your multimeter to 250 V AC and attach the test leads into the connector as follows:
Tester (+) to One of the 3 white leads
Tester (–) to Another white lead
○Start the engine (it is perfectly safe to do so with the connector unplugged. Just do not allow the test leads to cross or ground against the bike frame) @3 000 rpm you should see 54 V AC or more.
○Repeat the test for the other white leads, for a total of 3 combinations of connections to the white leads (ie: 1-2, 2-3, 1-3).

If the output voltages shows the value above, the stator operates properly and the regulator/rectifier is likely damaged. A much lower reading than the value above indicates that the stator is defective.
 

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Hi, thanks for the reply

Yes at battery terminals and while bike was running.

I will get someone smarter than me to help me with the rectifier test

Thanks again
 

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Hi, thanks for the reply

Yes at battery terminals and while bike was running.

I will get someone smarter than me to help me with the rectifier test

Thanks again
Don't play yourself down. I don't know about smarts but maybe confidence is your issue. It's really not complicated anymore than testing voltage at the battery. You just have to get on the floor and turn 2 bolts off. If you don't find someone I would gladly walk you through it in a call, just let me know.
 

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OK so couple things:

1) Ran bike more, tested battery again and results keep getting lower - final reading was 11 something

2) Finally got rectifier unplugged and think I figured out how to get some relevant findings:

First, I did several readings and each time i did sets, #'s got lower. If I mark the connections as

3 6
2 5
1 4

When I check with negative on 4, I get a reading of 11.4 on 1, 2 and 3

When I check with negative on 5, I get a reading of 11.1 on 1, 2 and 3

(Note that with each round of readings, the numbers dropped and the numbers above are my final #'s)

When I check with negative on 6, I do not get any readings

Thoughts?

Thanks in advance

Scott
 

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So okay first you should have tested the 3 stator coils by putting both your positive and negative tester leads to any two of the three connector pins coming from the stator, not neg to the other pins like you did.

There are three white wires coming into the back of that connector from the stator (corresponding to what you labeled as 1, 2, and 3 in your test description). So you have three possible combinations to attach your tester leads in order to test the stator coils. White 1 and white 2, white 1 and white 3, white 2 and white 3. Those other 3 pins (4, 5, and 6 in your test description) lead to the battery and ground via brown, red, and black wires coming into the back of the connector. And while I'm describing these wires coming into the back of that connector you'll probably have to clean them off to see their colors because they are likely greasy and dirty. Use electrical contact spray cleaner.

Your test however was not wasted time. Connecting your tester the way you did should never see any voltage at all. Your results tells me that you in fact have a short in your stator. The readings you got were the battery voltages with your neg test lead in pins 4 and 5 (battery pos). Your pos test lead in 1, 2, and 3 were connecting to ground (battery neg) through the defective stator coil wires. With time the insulation deteriorates allowing the coil wires to touch the bike frame (ground). The reason you got no reading when you moved the neg test lead to pin 6 is because that pin leads to ground. So essentially this is like touching the two test leads to the frame or the negative battery post. Not a complete circuit since you need the positive also. Just a side note, if you can recall, the voltage readings you got should have been -11.1 etc because you had your negative test lead getting positive power and vice versa. But this is not a problem since you still get the same voltage value just with a negative sign in front of it if you attach your test leads in reverse. Also the continuing drop in voltage as you did your tests were simply due to your battery getting drained while the engine was running.

To summarize you can go ahead and test the stator coils in the manner described above. However this would simply be academic since we already know your stator is bad.
 

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Thanks for your help with this!
 

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You're welcome. Please don't hesitate to ask anything more on this. I've been there and I know how disappointing a failed stator is. You are probably aware though that this is the weak link in Vulcans. Something to do with the way the factory stator was assembled leaves them not very durable. They should have a much longer lifespan if comparing to other bike brands.
 

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Hey again,

So I know how to do it, and to 100% verify it's my stator, I wanted to do 1 more test before ordering a Rick's stator. (and before I give my buddy his multimeter back)

I was looking at one of the tests mentioned at the start of this thread, and I have (one last!?) question:

Test 2 - Short to Ground

For this test, an analog meter is best. Set it to ohms,

Short to ground is the most common stator failure, and it's easy to test for.

First, disconnect the positive battery cable. (Important! You could damage your meter if you don't)

Second, locate the plug under the seat near the battery that contains four wires (black, brown, red and white). Unplug it. This will prevent a false reading.

Next, short out your meter (set to ohms, touch the leads together) and be sure that it reads ohms when shorted. Adjust if necessary. Then, attach a lead to the black (negative) battery cable, then touch a lead to each of the three white stator wires, record the readings.

If you are shorted to ground, you'll get a reading expressed in ohms. Any reading other than infinite is bad (refer to your meters owners manual to learn how infinite is expressed. On an analog meter, the needle will not move), and the stator should be inspected or replaced. The stator could still be good in this case (if the voltages are good) and you caught it early, but it is definitely shorted. Refer to the service manual for removing the stator, and check for worn insulation, rubbed wires, or another short condition.

In this example, when it mentions the 3 white stator wires, does it refer to the ones at the rectifier end? Or at the other end?
 

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I would assume it's describing the connector plug that attaches to the rectifier. If your question is asking about testing the prongs in the rectifier then no, not those. Just the prongs corresponding to each white wire in the plug. Once you verify 100% that the stator is bad (shorting to ground), which I can guarantee you will, you probably should test the rectifier also. Sometimes a bad stator ran too long will damage the rectifier. But worry about that later. For now get your stator sorted out.
 
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