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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I'm going to skip the intro to what my thinking was behind this modification, if your interested, follow the link below:

New Stock Intake Modification
http://www.vulcanforums.com/forums/showthread.php?t=4088&highlight=new+stock+intake

This is another useful link about an alternative modification:
Air Intake
http://www.vulcanforums.com/forums/showthread.php?t=3353&highlight=new+stock+intake

The filter element is a K&N E-9156, it cost about $50.

I am looking at some options on how to simplify this so more people may be able to do this modification. This modification requires tools that not everyone will have available.

Since I hate writing, I am going to pass over on some of the details that should be available in your Kawasaki shop manual. If there's something your not sure about, you can always ask more questions.

Specialty Tools that will be needed: Die grinder or rotozip with 1/4" collets, small circular cutting blade with 1/4" shaft, deburring tool with 1/4" shaft, drill press prefferably but minimum 3/8 chuck hand drill, 1-1/2" and 2" holesaw, transfer punches, center punch, center drill, countersink.


1) Remove your air filter cover, filter element and intake housing.
Note: There are 2 hoses, the idle adustment and temperature sensor plug that must be disconnected to remove housing.







2) Your going to use the old filter element frame. Cut off the top screw tab and the old filter element using die grinder or rotozip with cut-off blade.

 

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Discussion Starter #2
Part 2

2a) Cleanup the edges and make sure that the shoulder is flat, there will be an aluminum plate that must sit flat on these edges and be sealed.

3) In order to make a template you need to disassemble cleanup the surfaces on the intake box so you have a flat surface.
a) Remove the temperature sensor and rubber intake.



b) Remove throttle body rubber intake.



c) Cut off filter element threaded nut stub on back. Note: There is a larger round head on back of square metal threaded part, don't try to drive out front, cut back plastic cap off and drive nut out the back side.



d) Cut off temperature element threaded mounting stub on front.

 

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Discussion Starter #3
Part 3

4) Cut off the rubber intake (the one that seals to throttle body) to almost flush with the outside lip. You need to have a new blade in your utility knife when you do this. I found that placing a doll rod in a vise worked well for this step.




5) Taper the inside of the rubber intake at a 30-45 deg angle. This is very difficult to cut, again very sharp utility knife is essential. I'd consider using gloves here, at least on the hand that's holding the rubber, one slip could cost you a trip for stitches. This is one of those things that is a preference to do because it helps transition the air flow with less turbulence. I don't think it will mean much in performance if you want to skip this step. If you look at post Part 2, #3d you can get a closer picture after being re-installed.
You'll also notice that I didn't actually follow the same order of steps as shown in this thread, I was hesitant on cutting off anything on my intake box until I new it would work.



6) The next part is to make a template. You are trying get a tight fit in the filter element frame that you modified in part 1, #2. I made a paper cutout first because it was easier to trace, than I transfered this to cardboard for durability.



a) I am only showing these templates in the next picture to show an alternative backing plate for the new K&N filter. The drawn circle is the OD of the new filter element. The paper cut out was my original idea of using the stock intake box and having the air intake under the idle screw facing the front of bike. Note: The placement of intake was not my idea, it came form another "Air Intake" thread by Jace Bror, and look at Baitis post and he shows a picture. He also added a slotted extension of the circle on the front cover. I'm not trying to sell one idea or another, it just gives people different options. The only thing I'll say is that the reason I ended up enclosing the whole area (cardboard piece shown) and blocking off the back was a little straighter air flow coming in from the front of cover and possibly lower temperature air because your not right by the cylinder. You decide what options are best for you.



7) The next step is to cut out the back that will be placed in the original filter frame. I used 1/8" aluminum (10" x 10") because I have it available, I did consider using ABS plasic instead. Using the ABS you could solvent glue the panel to the frame. Just another option. I would mask off the new panel with masking tape on the side that you will mount the new filter at minimum, but I did both sides to keep from scratching sealing surface. Trace your template and cut out the new panel on a jig saw or you could use a saber saw. Cut the outline towards the outside of line. The easiest way to quickly contour the curves is with a bench top belt sander. I actually didn't have this available so I filed it down to its final shape. You'll see a picture after next step.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Part 4

8) The next step your going to place the new panel in the frame, and place this on the intake housing. Again ignore the fact that some of the pictures are in different order than what I'm writing here. I've had time to think about what steps to do when. The next picture shows me marking the cardboard, but you are going to trace the intake holes on the back of the new aluminum (or plastic) plate. What you will do after you remove the plate is measure the marked diameter north and south and mark the middle. Than from the east (or west side depending which hole your doing) outer circle measure to the center whatever 1/2 of the diameter measured, this is your center point. do this for other circle. Center punch the marked centers on both circles. Center points should be about 1-27/32".



9) You are going to cut these wholes out with a 2" holesaw. If you don't have a holesaw you could cut these out with a sabre saw, but this is much cleaner and simpler.



10) You'll have to finish these holes by grinding with a die grinder or file. You will have the air intake with the modified rubber installed (as per Part 2, #3d). With the new panel in frame place it over the intake. These holes should fit nice and snug around the outside lip of the rubber intake. You will see pictures in later part.

11) Once your done with wholes you will than put the panel and frame back onto air intake and mark the bolt holes. Note: The metal spacers where removed and will be replaced with longer ones. It is important to get perfect alignment of the holes. You will be replacing the hex socket head bolts with hex flat head bolts. This needs to be done because the new filter element will be sitting right over the 2 top bolts when this is all done. If the holes are off, the flat heads won't sit squarely in countersunk holes and will interfere with the filter seal. The preffered and most accurate way to mark this is with a transfer punch. If your not aware of what this is, it's a special machinist punch that's about the size of the hole (comes in 1/16" sizes) your trying to locate with a center point built into the center. Since this may not be a common tool, you will probably have to eyeball it and use a common center punch.



12) Now you'll remove the panel and drill the holes. I Center drilled the holes first, drill bits tend to drift, although this may not be available. It is prefferable to set this up in a drill press but it can be done by hand. One the holes are drilled you will have to turn the plate over and counter sink the holes for the flat head screws.

 

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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
Part 5

13) Now there should be 5 holes that are countersunk for flathead bolts. The next thing you need to drill is the hole for the new bolt that will hold your new filter on this new plate. This hole will line up on center with the top hole and down about 1-7/8" center to center. The hole will be drilled 17/64". You'll notice from the back view that the holes in the aluminum are smaller than the holes in the plastic, that is what the new bushings will butt up against when the are installed. They all line up nicely with plastice holes. You will also notice that the screw head is very close to the shoulder, your hole shouldn't protrude into this shoulder. I actually had to grind the head a little to fit nicely.



a) This picture shows the plate installed with the new center stud which is a 1/4-20 x 3". This almost completes the filter frame/panel. There are just a few things left to finish up that will come in a later part.



14) Next you'll need to finish modifying the intake assembly. In Part 2 we remove the stub that held the temperature element in position. We have to relocate this because it would interfere with the sealing surface for the new filter. The new screw mounting hole for the temperature sensor is the square hole where the orginal filter element mounting hole was. You'll use a 10-32 flat head screw the will fit in the hole nicely. Than you need to measure the temperature probe center from the mounting hole center. You will have to drill a new hole for this. The body of the temerature probe sits between the original boss that this prob was mounted on and the boss of the top center mounting hole. The flash made it kind of blury, but you'll notice there has to be a washer placed under the temp probe mounting hole to bring it flush with the 2 raised bosses that the body sits on.



a) This picture is also a little blury but I used flat ended grinding stone in my rotozip to grind a circular area for the oring on the temp probe to sit flat and make a seal. This is one step I didn't think about enough before I did it. The surface came out alright but it's very hard to get a nice flat parallel surface by hand. I should of done this in a drill press and used an end mill. This plastic gets gummy fast from heat. If you keep a little water on it to keep it cool it cuts much nicer.



14b) One thing that I just thought of that is worth mentioning from last part is if you thinking about pivoting the temperature probe the other way, away from the original boss, to eliminate the step of having to spot face the area for the oring, it will be difficult to remove the plug from the probe if not impossible. It is more crowded on the other side and the tab that you need to press to release the plug is facing down and would be difficult to release. The way it is located now it is easy to release the plug, I've had the assembly apart many times now.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Part 6

I've kind of lost interest in this. I guess not many other people are interested either. So I'm going to finish with a brief description of what's left, if you need more detail, you can always contact me. First I thought it would be good to have links to 2 other threads I mentioned that you may want to reference.

New Stock Intake Modification
http://www.vulcanforums.com/forums/showthread.php?t=4088

Air Intake
http://www.vulcanforums.com/forums/showthread.php?t=3353&highlight=air+intake

To finish off were I left off, you need to make a gasket to seal back of new plate.



I made new spacers that were 0.335" od x 0.251" id x 0.345 +- 0.005" (started with 3/8"od tubing).
I had reasons to do this, but don't want to take the time to explain.
I would consider the modification that is mentioned in "New Stock Intake Modification" thread, post #20 by thewazard. He made the 2 holes in the plate for the rubber gooseneck smaller. He cut the gooseneck flush or flat (didn't try to taper inlet like the one I have shown). The new plate uses the rubber as a gasket instead of my way of using a cork gasket. I believe he probably used stock spacers. The only thing I can't verify with this is the space between the existing intake flange and the new plate. If your spacers are to long the rubber intake won't totally tighten up when bolted together. If spacers are to short, you'll be pulling (bowing) in the back plate so it won't be flat.

I used six 6-32 x 1/4" flat heads to attached the completed back panel to the modified filter element frame, I also sealed the edges with blue permatex form a gasket. I used cork as an insulater on the back side that was facing old air intake. I also drilled a series of holes shown in picture in the upper right for the air hose that comes off of the top. I forgot about that hose until later, if I had thought about it earlier, I would of just cut the back panel around this area. If you block this hose as some people have, you don't have to worry about drilling these extra holes. Search for threads on "Marbling" if you don't know what I'm talking about.



Use a 1-1/2" holesaw to make opening in cover for intake rubber (2 holes). Just grind or file out the material left between the holes. I will be making a different intake modification this winter. I will add that when I complete it.



Because of the new bolt head that holds the filter on interfered with the intake assembly sitting flat, I had to grind some so the head wouldn't sit on throttle body mounting flange. Make sure you tqpe the throttle body opening when you do this so you don't get aluminum chips in there.

 

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Discussion Starter #7
Finished Product

At last I'm at the end, I will show you some completed pictures for reference and that's about it. The filter element is a K&N E-9156, it cost about $50. In the first picture you'll see some silver duct tape around Temp. probe. I filled in some of the old holes from the other side with the blue permatex form a gasket. I also taped over the flathead screw that was relocated for mounting the temp probe. Feel free to ask questions where I might not have been clear.







 

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If nother else, you have out thought the engineers at Kawa and K&N!!

Good work, get a patent and sell me a copy.
 

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rs900c

Hi there i have a question, the two hoses what are their purposes? i see that both recieve filtered air from the airbox. How accurate must the air sensor be placed?
I'm in the process of making an airbox from scratch to suit my tastes and just need to know what each component is for?
 

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I saw some of your photos were taken on the bed of a lathe mill combo, it sort of surprised me that you didn't just make a new airbox?
 

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rs900c

Hi there i have a question, the two hoses what are their purposes? i see that both receive filtered air from the airbox. How accurate must the air sensor be placed?
I'm in the process of making an airbox from scratch to suit my tastes and just need to know what each component is for?
The bottom hose is the crank case vent. This hose needs to have filtered air! You don't want to introduce contaminants to the inner workings/oil of the crank case. The upper hose is for the fresh air injection system for the exhaust. It is strictly for emissions. Most end up plugging this hose, once they start adding performance parts to help with popping on deceleration. The temp sensor just needs to be in the air stream to function. The stock location seems to be the most practical, because of the wire length on the connector and ease of airbox removal. You can move it without a problem, but will probably need to lengthen the wire harness.

HTH
Max
 

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Discussion Starter #12 (Edited)
Slash,
As MLR1 said, the bottom hose is the crankcase ventilation hose and top hose is for the air injection to the exhaust. I recently plugged the upper hose to the reed valve that feeds the exhaust (search on marbling in forum). With the air intake facing out I was getting quite a bit of back firing and the exhaust has a much more hollow sound when the reed valve is open (I did a partial debaffle of my exhaust). This wasn't as noticable with the stock air intake. It sounds better now because most of the backfiring is gone, and the hollow sound is gone also.

I'm not sure that it is critical to filter the crankcase ventilation hose, the only reason this goes to the intake is also because of emissions. This hoses job is to keep the crankcase from building up pressure inside from piston blowby. The idea for placing it in the stock filter is is to suck any fugitive vapors back into the combustion chamber to burn, also to trap any oil mist that may carry over. These crankcase hoses on older bikes are just routed to the bottom of the bike and go to atmospere.

I had contemplated making a whole new air box, but I really liked how the stock air box hides the fuel injection system, so I decided to modify the stock intake.

I wouldn't move the temperature sensor to far that you'd have to lengthen the wires. I just moved it because it was right in the middle of the filter seal on the backplate, I only moved it less than 1/2" to clear filter.
 

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Thanks guys.
So here's the latest update on my airbox escapade, the airbox is done and is at the anodisers shop at the moment, it takes a standard weber carb air filter and the air flow sensor has been relocated to beneath the injector intakes.
I will be able to run it like it is but i do still have to complete the air intake duct which ultimately will be the focal point of the airbox.
Will keep you posted and post pics when all is complete
 

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I used a length of hose (forgot what diameter... I think it was transmission line) and looped it from the crankcase vent at the bottom of the stock air intake 'box' up and around the crap hiding under the fuel tank and down to the engine. This prevents oil from filling your airbox (some guys have ruined air filters with the stock setup)
 

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Discussion Starter #15
I modified my design to something similar to what the thewazard did and commented on in one the attached links at beginning of this thread. This design is a little simpler than my original design, only 2 countersunk holes, uses stock spacers and no cork gasket. For now I will just post the pictures, and maybe later add comments.





 

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Discussion Starter #17 (Edited)
These two pictures show how tight things are.

This pictures shows where I had to notch bottom seal of filter for temperature sensor to fit.



This photo shows the bottom seal of filter right up against the bottom right bolt.

 

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RS900C,

Very good job, I am surprised this thread didn't take off. Amazing work. I for one wouldn't attempt it without the use of your garage and tools. But I know fine work when I see it. Good thinking outside the box. How was the performance? Did you end up getting or needing a fuel Processor?
 

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Air intake mod.

At the present time I have Cobra 2-1 pipes and a power commander, with K&N filter. I removed the snorkel, if that is what it is, from the back of the stock air box for about a 7% air gain. If my math is close, and it usually isn't. I am still looking for an airbox I like. The S&S looks good to me. I prefer the round style. I will wait until the riding season is over to finish.....07 LT...
 

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I like what you've done here and am in the process or removing a rattley Kuryakyn intake back to a modified stock intake. My only concern is that I may want more airflow and am thinking about how to incorporate more openings than what's shown in this thread. Love the idea though. I suppose I could cut out a section of the aluminum plate below the K & N filter and still get airflow from the original intake port between the cylinders.
 
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