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There's some poor advice in here from riders who don't appear to have 1700's...

Many years and a lot of miles on various tires trying a variety of pressures on my Voyager, has led me towards a sweet spot of rear 40, front 38, which I closely monitor with a Steelmate TPMS.

The front can handle less pressure without much of an issue. The rear can't. It gets too hot, which sends the pressure up high enough to trigger the alert I've set in the TPMS. Especially two-up with luggage, which is most of the time we ride.

It's even more of an issue at the moment, because the only replacement ME888 tire I could find when I picked up a serious nail out the back of nowhere on a trip around the South Island 6 months ago was a 180/60 made for a Goldwing. Apart from letting the bike scrape so much easier, the temperature will skyrocket if it doesn't have enough air in it. 40 minimum for this tire. I'll put up with the scraping for as long as I can, but already I know it'll be an early replacement.
 

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There's some poor advice in here from riders who don't appear to have 1700's...

Many years and a lot of miles on various tires trying a variety of pressures on my Voyager, has led me towards a sweet spot of rear 40, front 38, which I closely monitor with a Steelmate TPMS.

The front can handle less pressure without much of an issue. The rear can't. It gets too hot, which sends the pressure up high enough to trigger the alert I've set in the TPMS. Especially two-up with luggage, which is most of the time we ride.

It's even more of an issue at the moment, because the only replacement ME888 tire I could find when I picked up a serious nail out the back of nowhere on a trip around the South Island 6 months ago was a 180/60 made for a Goldwing. Apart from letting the bike scrape so much easier, the temperature will skyrocket if it doesn't have enough air in it. 40 minimum for this tire. I'll put up with the scraping for as long as I can, but already I know it'll be an early replacement.
If you are riding 2 up with luggage, then you probably do need a little bit higher pressure than someone, like me, that only rides solo. It's all about the total load on the tires. Just curious; what are your TPMS trigger pressures?
 

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FWIW, I did a lot of experimenting last summer with my tire pressures, and I have a temp gun. I was measuring warm but not hot temps for both the center tread and sidewall of each tire, with a maximum pressure change of 4 or 5 psi, which as I understand it, is not bad - meaning I have plenty of air in the tire to prevent a low pressure issue, at least for one-up riding. I forget what the actual temps were, but a far more knowledgeable rider than myself said I was in the right temp range.

-John
 

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... Just curious; what are your TPMS trigger pressures?
The Steelmate unit had default threshold set at 36PSI, with alerts triggered 30% (11PSI) either side of that (so high pressure alarm at 47PSI, low pressure alarm at 25PSI). High temp alarm 176°F

That was OK with the 180/65 tire, but the 180/60 kept triggering the high pressure alarm. I've bumped the threshold up to 40PSI, so the alert won't trigger until over 51. Loaded up on a trip, on a warm day, it usually hovers at around 50.

It's a nice, and cheap, TPMS I found on AliExpress. I owe it a lot for letting me know about the nail we picked up down south.
 

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The Voyager owners manual has the front tire pressure at 28 pounds, that sounds a little low to me although i ran the factory Bridgestone at that spec and i now have a new front tire on and i am thinking of ignoring factory spec but was curious at what most other guys with a Voyager run the front tire at.
Kawasaki spends millions of dollars on design and engineering. After all listen to the manufacture of the bike. Don't you think they know more than you. If Kawasaki says 28 PSI on the front tire then it's 28 PSI, unless you know more than there design engineers and research and development team. Stay with 28 PSI
 

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Kawasaki spends millions of dollars on design and engineering. After all listen to the manufacture of the bike. Don't you think they know more than you. If Kawasaki says 28 PSI on the front tire then it's 28 PSI, unless you know more than there design engineers and research and development team. Stay with 28 PSI
You'll be very much in the minority around here with that recommendation.
 

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Kawasaki spends millions of dollars on design and engineering. After all listen to the manufacture of the bike. Don't you think they know more than you. If Kawasaki says 28 PSI on the front tire then it's 28 PSI, unless you know more than there design engineers and research and development team. Stay with 28 PSI
At 28 psi cold with a new fairly tire (the recommended Bridgestone, too) my front tire reached over 150°F (I have a TPMS which shows the tire temp as well as pressure) while cruising at about 70 mph on the highway on a mild spring day with temps in the mid 70s. I pulled off, let it cool, inflated to 32 psi. The rest of the ride, it never got over about 80°F and it never got more than about 110°F even when the temps were above 100°F after that.

Unfortunately, I had already put about 1000 miles on the tires on surface streets by then. By 5000 miles, the tire was very worn in a pattern that indicated that they were run too long at too low pressure, that is, the center still had plenty of tread, but the tread to the outside was completely worn down.

Plenty of other Kawasaki owners have had similar issues with running 28 psi.

People trusted Ford's tire pressure recommendations in the Ford/Firestone tire disaster and too many paid for it with their lives. Too many times, marketing, sales, and legal departments override engineering specs. I worked in R&D in a large corporation and have seen this first hand. Putting absolute trust in published vehicle design and engineering specs in the face of significant evidence that something is wrong, is foolish.
 
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At 28 psi cold with a new fairly tire (the recommended Bridgestone, too) my front tire reached over 150°F (I have a TPMS which shows the tire temp as well as pressure) while cruising at about 70 mph on the highway on a mild spring day with temps in the mid 70s. I pulled off, let it cool, inflated to 32 psi. The rest of the ride, it never got over about 80°F and it never got more than about 110°F even when the temps were above 100°F after that.

Unfortunately, I had already put about 1000 miles on the tires on surface streets by then. By 5000 miles, the tire was very worn in a pattern that indicated that they were run too long at too low pressure, that is, the center still had plenty of tread, but the tread to the outside was completely worn down.

Plenty of other Kawasaki owners have had similar issues with running 28 psi.

People trusted Ford's tire pressure recommendations in the Ford/Firestone tire disaster and too many paid for it with their lives. Too many times, marketing, sales, and legal departments override engineering specs. I worked in R&D in a large corporation and have seen this first hand. Putting absolute trust in published vehicle design and engineering specs in the face of significant evidence that something is wrong, is foolish.
The Voyager has been around a long time. The data should be spot on. However I respect your opinion. I'm not all knowing.
You'll be very much in the minority around here with that recommendation.
That's ok, kawasaki recommends that you check pressure frequently, and check when the bike has been sitting for awhile. Temperature and weather plays into there data recommendations. We all don't think alike or always agree, and that's ok 👌
 
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