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Discussion Starter #1
hey yall,
I asked about this months ago, nvr got enough feedback/detail to make a constructive decision or what i should i do or not.

the 900 manual says carry weight should be 398lbs for 2 riders , however, not sure if they know or count that i have a windshield, bags and backrest , prolly 75lbs total i figure.

well today i took out the ol' lady on the 900 for first time ( after some good tuneup work i ve put in on the bike for the few months). we total about 425lbs, give or take a few lbs. I wasn't reving the bike at all, in fact i was taking it eze, prolly2eze.

I also bumped psi to 35 rear /32 front, i felt that helped a bit.

Findings compared to just when i am riding:
very poor acceleration
fan came on a bit more
braking fine
shock dropped like 2 inches
handling stiff

i was trying to listen to the bike and here if it was struggling.
so my question is, would you take a one to hour ride with a stop or two in between, and risk hurting the bike or over heating in anyway with the extra weight? these are the times i wana join the darkside and get a used goldwing... lol.

I am concerned when they say 396lbs total , their including the accessories so that means i need a 100lb passenger.

what yall think???
thank you!
 

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2020 VN900D Classic LT
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I've got a VN900D (The Classic LT) with the factory windshield, saddle bags and backrest.

Looking at the Kawasaki specs.... The 900B's curb weight is 610 lbs. The extra accessories on the 900D increases the curb weight to 657 Lbs. (It's 47 Lbs heavier). Yet..Despite the extra weight, the 900 Classic LT owner's manual, also uses the same 397 Lb maximum loading figure.

If the recommended VN900 loading weight was a precise thing, they would have subtracted the extra 47 pounds from the LT's loading info giving 350 Lbs.. They didn't. So I wouldn't worry too much about it.

I find my 900 is a bit of a dog when it comes to acceleration.. (It only has 50 HP). I haven't carried a passenger yet, but I'd expect to see a big hit in acceleration if I did. I'm sure there are many here who have carried passengers and would be more qualified to answer this.
 

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397 lbs is the max rear tire tire load at 32 psi.
 

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2020 VN900D Classic LT
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In the 'Safe Riding' section of the manual it shows tire capacity.. The front is good for 397 Lbs @ 28 PSI. The rear is good for 215 Lbs at 28 PSI and from 215 to 397 Lbs @ 32 PSI..

But, elsewhere in the manual in the "Loading" section, it states that the 'Total Payload' of the bike must not exceed 397 Lbs.

In my post above, I was just pointing out that Kawasaki doesn't seem to care about the extra weight of a windshield, bags and a backrest when calculating the "Total Payload" of the VN900.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
thanks for reply, so far, i get form ya'll , 'must not' exceed, is prolly a serious thing.
Not sure if it would affect the power train/pulleys, rear axle with undue stress? just not sure about taking that 1 hour ride with over 400lbs on it?
 

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It will be fine, the suspension will ride ruff is about the biggest issue. Goldwings can exceed the tire weight rating with one rider and it is not an issue. The safety facture on the tire weight rating is at least 2X.
 

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I think you all should be careful about advising "it will be fine" or "I wouldn't worry too much about it" - regarding over-loading a motorcycle (or ANY vehicle, load rating or towing capacity).

Sure, the VN900 will be able to move with 1,000 lbs on the seat, but try to get insurance coverage when you crash, or one of the tires blows, or who knows what - and you have over-loaded the bike - and couldn't stop in time...or whatever.

Liondog, a "constructive decision" in this case has to do with your tolerance for risk...the manufacturer has advised you of the maximum load...if you choose to over-load the bike (or whatever vehicle), that's on you. Your risk, your life, your insurance, your cost. You get the idea.

No one in their right mind should be telling you, on a public chat board, that you should "go for it" and over-load the bike with 425 lbs (people) + 50 lbs (gear) = 475 lbs total. That is ~ 75 lbs over the recommended maximum.

You can choose your own level of risk tolerance in this life...and you can live with the consequences...
 

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I 'm Lucky my gal tips the scales at 110, I can carry 15lbs of extra stuff after helmets and riding gear.:cool:
 

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Discussion Starter #9
thanks shadow1 and spencea, good points, i think I have to speak to someone who is in my situation or mechanical engineer

shadow1- how you know it can move with 1k lbs on the bike, where did you hear that?

Rider 50- thanks for bragging...hehehe

i did want to trade this in for a used goldwing for that very reason, i bet goldwing is prolly 500lbs rider capacity.


,
 

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"liondog" don't be surprised that most road bikes have a load limit around 400 lbs. I know that I was.

Don't know how long you hold your gears? But if you holdem a bit longer the bike has a lot of power, its just about a 1000 rpm higher than the other brand that's known by a (H)undred (D)ollars.
 

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thanks shadow1 and spencea, good points, i think I have to speak to someone who is in my situation or mechanical engineer

shadow1- how you know it can move with 1k lbs on the bike, where did you hear that?

Rider 50- thanks for bragging...hehehe

i did want to trade this in for a used goldwing for that very reason, i bet goldwing is prolly 500lbs rider capacity.


,
Get a Kawasaki Concours... carries 500 lbs and WAY more fun than a gold wing... and much more affordable
 

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(edited) Liondog, come on dude. shadow 1 was being facetious about the 1000 lbs, I'm sure. Probably what he meant was people overload their bikes, sometimes excessively, all the time and get away with it, but the more you exceed the specified limits, the more risk you are taking.

As far as speaking "to someone who is in my situation or mechanical engineer", if another person is overloading their bike and have had no problems what can you conclude from that? People wear their tires down to the belts all the time and most don't seem to have catastrophic blowouts, and are proud of it, but those that have will tell you they will never let their tires wear that far again. A mechanical eng. who does not work for Kawasaki will tell you that the load limits are calculated with a safety factor built in, but loading or beyond the actual calculated limit increases your risk. They won't be able to tell you how big the safety factor is, but they may give an "educated" guess, but that's all it is...a guess and they won't be able to give you a concrete answer as to how much of a risk overloading is. Even a properly loaded bike can fail due to load. The load limit is determined as a load at which the risk is minimal and acceptable.

Bottom line, if you want to load your bike with more than Kawasaki advises, you are taking a risk. If you have an accident, you may have insurance issues, even if the accident isn't your fault. You have a higher chance of damaging the bike if you hit a pothole that would not have damaged the bike at the recommended load limit. You have a higher risk of blowing a bead off a rim or other stress related tire failures. You have to decide if the risk is worth it.
 

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You called out the wrong dude...
Ooops! Sorry! I will edit that post. Saw your quote of Liondog's post and had a brain fart.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
thanks guys, thanks sabre..........so what I got from that a risk that is understandable and well pointed out.
and I will take that into account. No talk on engine stress.

but I am getting the impression that the power train will not be affected on the 900, I was also worried about the engineer and belt strain on moving 50 to 75lbs more than recommended, should I be concerned?

thanks!
 

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thanks guys, thanks sabre..........so what I got from that a risk that is understandable and well pointed out.
and I will take that into account. No talk on engine stress.

but I am getting the impression that the power train will not be affected on the 900, I was also worried about the engineer and belt strain on moving 50 to 75lbs more than recommended, should I be concerned?

thanks!
Mainly, you would be stressing the suspension and other load bearing points by overloading the bike. I would worry more about that and how the bike handles with the excess weight than I would about the engine and drive train. You will have a longer braking distance. It will handle differently in turns. If you hit a hard bump, you are more likely to damage the suspension. You said the shock dropped 2" with the excess weight. Did you adjust the shocks to account for the extra weight? Riding 1 up vs. 2 up requires some adjustment to the rear shocks. If you are still getting an excessive drop, think what that means if you hit a pothole or something.
 
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