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Just wondering if this is a sign I should be doing some particular maintenance.

I hadn't fired up the Vaquero 1700 since Friday because I just got the 1600 out of the shop, rode that around for a bit. This morning I decided to jump back on the Vaquero. It's parked in the garage, in first gear. Pull in the clutch, back it up...feels like I'm going up a bit of an incline. Odd. Clutch is all the way in.

Fire up the bike - lurches forward a bit. Hmm. Clutch is definitely all the way in.

Put the bike in neutral. Fire it up. Put it in first. Clutch is in. It's under power. Not much, mind you...I can resist it but it's definitely rolling forward under power a bit.

Play around with it a bit. Problem goes away. Ride it 15 miles to work without an issue.

Maybe it just missed me?
 

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WAG, air in the line? Just like brakes, after you pump it a few times, the air is pocketed and you now have a firm clutch. I haven't had the need yet to look for where to bleed air out of the system, so I can't help with specifics.
 

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I highly recommend flushing and bleeding ALL hydraulic systems at least once a year. Heat, age and humidity are the biggest factors in hydraulic fluid deterioration and due to the fluid in the clutch system getting hot far more than the fluid in the braking systems that clutch fluid will deteriorate quicker.

RACNRAY
 

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I have no experience with the 1700 specifically but have experienced this on a few other bikes I've owned. The clearance between the clutch plates and friction plates is very small even when the clutch is fully disengaged, usually only a few thousandth of an inch divided by all the gaps between every plate. As cold oil rests in these gaps it can provide traction from the friction plates to the drive plates to a greater degree than hot oil, (of which there is very little due to the centrifugal force when everything is spinning) this additional viscosity due to the colder oil could be the issue IF you know the hydraulic system is perfectly bleed. My own experience is usually that once the engine is started the clutch stops dragging, the only exception being with extreme cold or an oil with a viscosity much higher than is recommended. Hope this helps.
 

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Never happened on my Voyager, but has happened on my mean streak and some of my cable actuated clutch bikes. I try not to leave them in gear in my garage and don't have that happen when keep them in neutral.
 
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