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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hello,

I have an 05 800 Classic that I've owned since 2012 and it had around 600 miles when I got it. All the maintainance since has bee done by myself or a local mechanic. I am now at 11,700 miles and decided to do my own valves. The front cylinder went well but the back is where I'm have a problem. I got the cover off thanks to all I've learned here. The intake side went just fine but the exhaust side is not sliding to allow the shims to be exposed. I pushed and tapped with a hammer and screwdriver, 3/8 extensions to give me more length. All this has done is move the top part enough to expose half of the shim.

What I think may have happened is the spring that applies resistance to the section above the shim some how became stuck between the shaft and the part that slides creating a wedge. I'm trying to dig it out with different shaped picks but I'm not able to get it free. Does anyone have an idea how to free the spring or mechanism without a top engine tear down? Thanks for you help.

The parts I am talking about are 92144A and 12016A
http://www.cheapcycleparts.com/oemparts/a/kaw/500b2825f8700223e4792d81/valve-s
Ron
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks 98, I used the TR mark on the bottom. Yup! Feeling dumb but glad for your assist.

Ron
 

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I have a '05 800 and plan on doing a valve shim maintenance, so was doing a search of former posts involving valve shims,
so I am just learning the proper terms and procedures before I start it on my bike,
just wondering what the TR mark on the bottom means and refers to?
and what tools are needed for this job?, I might have to make a list of needed tools for the valve shim maintenace job and go shopping
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Btom,

You can see on you tube how to do shims in this video.
It's important to place a rag inside the open valve to avoid dropping a shim down inside it.
There is a line on top of the cam that show you where top dead center is and I began using the right side for both valves. Big mistake each side has it's own line. That's what TR implied. It's not a hard job just a little labor intensive the first time around. Give yourself an afternoon of uninterrupted time.

If you need shims and a digital caliper PM me I no longer need mine and will ship both for $65 in the US.

Ron
 

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looking at the video it shows tools needed for the job and shows LANG feeler gauge on the list, but it's a gauge set measure in inches,
did you use a inches feeler gauge set or a metric gauge set
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Metric gauge is what I used. Do you have a manual? You'll need it for the spec adjustments.
 

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There is a line on top of the cam that show you where top dead center is and I began using the right side for both valves. Big mistake each side has it's own line. That's what TR implied
I see where the front cylinder has the cam wheel on the left side with line on the wheel (left side when sitting on seat), and the rear cylinder has cam wheel on the right hand side, but unsure of where you said, "began using the right side for both valves. Big mistake each side has it's own line".

I assume you set the line horizontal on the left side cam wheel on the front cylinder doing front valves and you set the line horizontal on the rear cylinder cam wheel on the right side doing rear valves? I am still confused what TR means
 

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ya have a manual with specs
 

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Discussion Starter #10
TR is a bone headed mistake on my part. Don't let it throw you.
Yes there is a line on both cams, one for each valve.
 

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oh wait, TR means that you used the right side rear cylinder cam wheel marking to do the front cylinder valves?
 

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ok I watched his Youtube video on that link for valve clearance procedure and have a question.
On his video he uses 4 feeler gauge sizes, two sizes for the Intake valves 0.10mm and 0.15mm and these correspond to the valve clearance standard in the service manual for the Intake
BUT, his Exhaust feeler clearances of 0.25 mm and 0.30 mm do not match my service manual, the service manual says standard clearance is between 0.20 and 0.25 mm for Exhaust valves.
So should the Exhaust be between 0.25 & 0.30 mm -or- like the manual says between 0.20 & 0.25 mm
 

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Make sure your service manual matches EXACTLY to the year and model of your bike.
Kawasaki changed the specifications at one point....I do not remember when.
 

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Don't have a 800, I would use the specs in the service manual, if the correct year/model
Just my .02
 

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found an older post on exhaust valve clearance specs,
March 2014
here's the link
http://www.vulcanforums.com/forums/56-vulcan-800/110265-valve-adjustments.html

in post #3 griffjo says:

rick - FYI: OLDER service manuals specify exhaust spec. as 0.25mm to 0.30mm
Newer service manuals (through '04 models) have changed - now state 0.20mm to 0.25mm
(Why the change? Who knows?)
Intake still the same at 0.10m to 0.15mm


my service manual is not dated but says exhaust clearance should be 0.20 to 0.25 mm
I found older reference material to exhaust clearance to say 0.25 to 0.30 mm
maybe the correct clearance for exhaust is 0.20 to 0.25 if I go by my service manual on hand that the previous owner gave me with the bike, with no date on it other than a penciled written 95-04
 

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maybe an exhaust valve opening sooner is better than later, so wouldn't a exhaust valve spec of 0.20-0.25 be better than a 0.25-0.30 ?
 

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maybe an exhaust valve opening sooner is better than later, so wouldn't a exhaust valve spec of 0.20-0.25 be better than a 0.25-0.30 ?
I was searching on this for a while. And I found out that only the earlier year service manuals (found on the internet) recommend clearance of 0.20-0.25 mm. So, I pretend to think that going for 0.25-0.30 mm gap is done by Kawasaki for some technical reason. Actually, my opinion is that it is better to go for a bigger gap, than a smaller. If the valve can not be fully closed, it will "burn down" sooner.
 

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I love a good mystery, so went searching deep inside the internet for an answer to the question, which to me was = should the correct VN800 Exhaust valve clearance spec be .20-.25mm -or- .25-.30mm

I was searching on this for a while. And I found out that only the earlier year service manuals (found on the internet) recommend clearance of 0.20-0.25 mm. So, I pretend to think that going for 0.25-0.30 mm gap is done by Kawasaki for some technical reason.
Sorry but that is incorrect, Kawasaki is not to blame.

I think in my research I have found the problem which was causing the confusion.
The following resources for VN800 EXhaust valve clearance specs are in error.

Which makes CruserDayz Youtube video Oct. 2014 of EX 0.25-0.30mm in error
Which makes Mike's .PDF file created June 2011 of EX .25-.30mm in error
Which also makes the write up this forum's sticky on clearance for EX 0.25-0.30mm in error

The problem begin in the years prior to the VN800 2000 or 2001 model years.
The Kawasaki Service Manual specs for EX prior to those model years stated EX spec should be 0.25 - 0.30mm
At that time those specs found there way into the Clymer Manual and was printed EX 0.25-0.30 mm and remains that way

But, in 2001 Kawasaki engineers changed the specs on EX and began printing in their Service Manuals EX valve clearance values of 0.20mm - 0.25 mm
But that change by Kawasaki and so printed in later Kawasaki Service Manuals DID NOT find there way thereafter into the printed Clymer's Manual
Result = The confusion on EX specs has been from Clymers continually misprinting outdated specs that date back to 2001

Solution = Do not trust your VN800 Clymer Manual, it cannot be trusted for any accuracy on VN800 specs, and refer to the Kawasaki Service Manual printed after 2001
 

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So, does it mean that every second Kawasaki VN800A, VN800 Classic, ... (same engine model)... owner has done it totally wrong for long time?
Well... M'kay... If nobody has killed his engine yet, then the difference should not be so vital? Or what?
 

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correct, nobody has killed his engine doing the EX .25-.30 mm because the Exhaust valves are not the ones that can ruin the heads, it's the Intake valves that need to be exact, (as far as I know anyways)
 
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