Kawasaki Vulcan Forum banner

1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
536 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I have done quite a few valve adjusts on various bikes. The bikes that had shims I was always able to read the size on the shims I had to replace. Some were "shim under bucket" style and some were like our 900's and against the tappet. I hear people saying they need a digital caliper to measure the existing shims in order to know the size they need to bring it back to spec. Does anybody have trouble reading the shim size when you remove it? I don't want to buy a digital caliper if I know the size of the shim and I know the shims don't wear....the valve train wears since it is softer than the shims. My bike has 13,000 miles on it and I plan on doing the valve adjust fairly soon so I need to know. I'd rather not get it apart and have to scramble around looking for a way to measure them. Your help would be appreciated on this.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,881 Posts
I believe they are the same shims as the 800. When I did mine, I couldnt see the size on the origanals. I simply held one up against a couple from the kit and tried the one that was closest, then checked the clearance. If too tight I went 2 sizes smaller, you can easily read the size on the new ones. If too loose, I take the cleance required and the clearance measured too figure what should work and check again. Kinda trial and error, but works. Bought this kit, if you plan to keep the bike for awhile, its well worth it.
http://www.powersportsuperstore.com/Hot-Cams-9-48mm-Complete-Valve-Shim-Kit-HCSHIM02-p/4114411.htm
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
536 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Thanks...yea I bought the same shim kit and will probably do the comparing shims if I can't read them. I'm hoping most are in spec but it sounds like there are people here who replace quite a few at the 15,000 mile mark. No telling but once they are adjusted I hope it stays for a while. Thanks for your help.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,881 Posts
I got lucky on mine, didnt do them till about 65k on mine. I found out how from this forum by the way. When I did, I only needed to change 3 shims on each head. Did them again at about 82k and noticed 1 cam lobe on each head was starting to show signs of wearr so replaced them at 86k. Each time though, only replaced 3 of 4 shims per head.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,311 Posts
I've seen digital calipers on sale at Harbor Freight for as little as $10, and they are quite good. I have one. But an inexpensive or moderately priced micrometer will be much more accurate in that application than the caliper. I use the caliper mostly for drill sizes, and then use a micrometer if it's really that important to have the right drill bit.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
536 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
I just dug through my tool boxes and found a very old dial indicator that will be just perfect for this. It was misplaced in our retirement move but I knew it was somewhere.
Works perfect and will do just fine on these shims....not that $10 was gonna break me but I really hate stopping in the middle of a bike project. Good to go now. Thanks guys.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,311 Posts
I just dug through my tool boxes and found a very old dial indicator that will be just perfect for this. It was misplaced in our retirement move but I knew it was somewhere.
Works perfect and will do just fine on these shims....not that $10 was gonna break me but I really hate stopping in the middle of a bike project. Good to go now. Thanks guys.
I'd kind of like to know how that will work....?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
47 Posts
I'd kind of like to know how that will work....?
I would guess that he's going to set the indicator up on some flat stock, and then slide the various shims underneath. As long as he has an indicator with enough travel, it can be a great and quick way the measure and compare.

Here's something a little more fancy, but you should get the idea...

 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,311 Posts
I would guess that he's going to set the indicator up on some flat stock, and then slide the various shims underneath. As long as he has an indicator with enough travel, it can be a great and quick way the measure and compare.

Here's something a little more fancy, but you should get the idea...

Well, you don't need much travel since the difference between shims is about .002"
I get the idea of such a setup, but think a micrometer would still be faster and more precise.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
536 Posts
Discussion Starter #10 (Edited)
stripperguy.... pretty much a direct hit but on a smaller scale. See below. This was a garage sale item that I bought and didn't really need it until now.

 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top