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Discussion Starter #1
Hello All:

I am soon a proud owner of a brand new 2019 Vulcan S Cafe (in lovely Orange).

I saw the various videos how to un-restrict them by removing the throttle limit stop and unplugging dummy plug.

My Question: Does somebody know if this is still the same procedure on the 2019 model ?

Some youtuber claims 2017 models and up can not be un-restricted anymore without reprogramming the ECU.

Thanks,

Hawat
 

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Do you live in the United States? If so Congratulations, none of the Vulcan S or other motorcycles for that matter regardless of model year have ever been restricted. So you can't De-strict them since they were never restricted :wink2: Now, if you live in one of those countries that restrict the motorcycle until you reach a certain experience level or reach another type of license then I can't help you. Follow your countries laws and have the bike de-restricted by the dealer when you reach your required experience level or license type.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
IndyTom,

hmmm .. thank you for your advice. No, I do not live in the United States but in Australia where they are restricted.

And thank you for the advise to reach a higher experience level. I am 50 years old, and have a motorcycle license since I am 18, an open license for about 28 years. I have owned many motorcycles in my life, currently a BMW R 1100 RT, a Harley Davidson Iron 883 and a Suzuki V-Strom 650; so I guess I could handle a unrestricted Parallel Twin 650 cc :) Dealers don't unrestrict them here for you as they are afraid of legal consequences. So all I really want to know is if the 2019 unrestriction method is still the same as for the earlier models, thank you ;-)
 

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Not sure why they would restrict a bike for an experienced rider with all the proper licenses. Doesn't make much sense. But to your question, yes, the 2017 is identical to the 2019. Except the pretty colors of course. So whatever procedure is out there for the 2017 model should work for the 2019 model as well.
 

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IndyTom,

hmmm .. thank you for your advice. No, I do not live in the United States but in Australia where they are restricted.

And thank you for the advise to reach a higher experience level. I am 50 years old, and have a motorcycle license since I am 18, an open license for about 28 years. I have owned many motorcycles in my life, currently a BMW R 1100 RT, a Harley Davidson Iron 883 and a Suzuki V-Strom 650; so I guess I could handle a unrestricted Parallel Twin 650 cc :) Dealers don't unrestrict them here for you as they are afraid of legal consequences. So all I really want to know is if the 2019 unrestriction method is still the same as for the earlier models, thank you ;-)
So if you walked into the Kawasaki dealership and bought a liter bike and showed your "open" license, there's no problem but you buy a restricted 650 and show your open license and they won't de-restrict it? What am I missing?
 

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Discussion Starter #6
IndyTom,

thank you for your answer. That was I was hoping for. Getting it in pretty Candy Steel Furnace Orange with Black Metallic Sparkle (lol - who comes up with these names ??).

The way how I understand it, with Kawasaki selling the bike LAMS approved (Australia's Learners license restricted to 150kw per 1000 kg) they open themselves to a market which otherwise they wouldn't have access to. However the Australian market is simply not large enough to justify selling the bike in two different versions (restricted and unrestricted), which would create more headache for keeping stock at dealers and central warehouse etc. As in every business one key to maximizing profit is keeping stock levels to a minimum. That's not a problem in the U.S. or Japan where they shift probably 100's of those each week, but in Australia the numbers are much much less.

Now, according to my dealer they wont unrestrict it when you buy it, even if you can show them you have a proper open license because they are afraid of legal backslash. They argue, that they have no control over who is actually riding the bike. If they sell me an unrestricted version and I re-sell this bike to a learners license holder (or let one ride it) he could buy a second hand unrestricted version without even knowing. If that guy goes and kills himself or others questions will be asked who modified the bike to be more powerful although it is widely advertised to be LAMS approved. That potentially could spell disaster for the dealership, so they simply wont do it.

On the other hand when I unrestrict the bike myself and I ride it, I don't do anything illegal, as my license does not limit me to anything. I just need to be careful to put the restriction back in place before I re-sell it.

Bit of an interesting situation here in that domain. But I do need to congratulate the Australian Government to put this restriction in place and wont let any 21 year old show-off with no experience whatsoever on a 200HP+ H2, R1 or Hayabusa :)
 

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IndyTom,

thank you for your answer. That was I was hoping for. Getting it in pretty Candy Steel Furnace Orange with Black Metallic Sparkle (lol - who comes up with these names ??).

The way how I understand it, with Kawasaki selling the bike LAMS approved (Australia's Learners license restricted to 150kw per 1000 kg) they open themselves to a market which otherwise they wouldn't have access to. However the Australian market is simply not large enough to justify selling the bike in two different versions (restricted and unrestricted), which would create more headache for keeping stock at dealers and central warehouse etc. As in every business one key to maximizing profit is keeping stock levels to a minimum. That's not a problem in the U.S. or Japan where they shift probably 100's of those each week, but in Australia the numbers are much much less.

Now, according to my dealer they wont unrestrict it when you buy it, even if you can show them you have a proper open license because they are afraid of legal backslash. They argue, that they have no control over who is actually riding the bike. If they sell me an unrestricted version and I re-sell this bike to a learners license holder (or let one ride it) he could buy a second hand unrestricted version without even knowing. If that guy goes and kills himself or others questions will be asked who modified the bike to be more powerful although it is widely advertised to be LAMS approved. That potentially could spell disaster for the dealership, so they simply wont do it.

On the other hand when I unrestrict the bike myself and I ride it, I don't do anything illegal, as my license does not limit me to anything. I just need to be careful to put the restriction back in place before I re-sell it.

Bit of an interesting situation here in that domain. But I do need to congratulate the Australian Government to put this restriction in place and wont let any 21 year old show-off with no experience whatsoever on a 200HP+ H2, R1 or Hayabusa :)
I understand what you are saying but it's still not fair to someone like you with an open license who wants to enjoy the full potential of the bike. I don't know why they just can't have some legal paperwork for you to sign that goes to Kawasaki corporate and your local motor vehicle department where you take full responsibility for the now unrestricted bike. Once you find out if it actually needs an ECU reflash , if it were me, I would start contacting Kawasaki corporate and see what they can do for you.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Afterburner,

yes good advise. I don't understand it myself why this is the way it is. In some ways Australia customers is always being treated unfairly. Kawasaki doesn't offer the Ergo-Fit system here, either. Meaning: Yes you can still have a different handle bar and/or different seat but you actually have to pay for them ! Dealers (well, at least my local dealer) doesn't even keep them in stock until you order one. But I plan to squeeze my dealer to add a extended reach handlebar when it comes to final price negotiations :)

I will go back to my dealer on Monday. I will have a look at the bike to see if I can spot the throttle limiter bolt.
 

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I bought my Vulcan S as a demo model it had the plug and throttle stop already taken off ,
my dealers over here in UK would derestrict bike if it leaner legal and they passed there test ,some of the big engined Kawasaki bikes are
A 2 compliance, which means a learner can ride them,

Its a crazy idea because most of them will do 100mph
 

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The next level of absurdity in our country is the insurance factor.
Because local road authorities only permit the Vulcan S as a LAMS (learner) compliant bike with restrictions, most insurance companies null and void any claim if the bike has had it's power train (including electrics) modified all the way down to the exhaust. My insurer does allow an exhaust mod but not an ECU mod which makes complete sense because max power/torque is lost by doing so.
On the positive side it means that LAMS bike retain a very high resale value due to their high restrictions and availability.
I'm still not 100% sure I'm allow to modify the bike in any way even though I have an open licence.
I've been contemplating parting out with my beloved bike for something else but from a cost perspective I've just re insured and re-registered my commuter bike for half the price of say a 1300cc bike.
 

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A question for OP..

Here in NZ the Vulcan S is sold in two flavours, LAMS and full power. Is that not the case in Aus??
 

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Discussion Starter #12
No. In Australia its only sold as LAMS. Interesting that Kawasaki has a different strategy in NZ - you would think they treat both markets the same. It looks like in NZ they sell the Cafe version as un-restricted and the S and SE versions as LAMS / restricted versions. Although the text on their website actually refers to the Cafe version as 'LAMS approved', the specification lists it as 61 HP, while the S and SE are listed as 48 HP. So I guess the text is just a mistake by copy/pasting the same description.

I find it also interesting that they offer the Ergo Fit System in NZ, which they don't do here in Oz (for whatever reason), unless you pay for it. However, I squeezed my dealer to change the handlebar and foot pegs for free anyways.

I am happy to report that I took delivery of my 2019 Vulcan S Cafe (in lovely Orange) and the un-restrict procedure is exactly the same as in earlier models. Remove the plug to upgrade the engine from 48Hp to 61HP and remove the throttle restrictor. What a sweet bike :)
 

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Congrats on your bike :)

I recently bought a 2017 Vulcan S (not Cafe) new on sale, but they reged it as 2018.. and it was unrestricted. Well at least that's how they sold it. Certainly doesn't feel like a LAMS bike, and they had other LAMS ones there which they were selling for more $ - LAMS are easier to sell. It was previously a display model at some show and had a bunch of extras, so maybe they never restricted it. And you're right, the ergofit is offered here free of charge.

Enjoy your new bike, I'm finding I'm liking mine more and more :)
 
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