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Discussion Starter #1
So I went for my 3rd ride yesterday to get familiar with my bike and as luck would have it, at each light or stop sign, I was at the front. Feeling the pressure of needing to get moving with traffic behind me, I stalled out at just about every stop. I know I need practice but I don't have any abandoned roads or parking lots near my home to practice without needing to worry about others so my only option is to make a fool of myself out in the real world. Not very confidence inspiring
 

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Don't worry about being embarrassed. I would be a little concerned about safety though. I think I would try to find a rural area an hour or more away and practice away from heavy traffic. Or possibly a closed shopping center with a large parking lot? I know you say there's nothing near your house but hopefully if you drive a ways you can find something. Good luck and keep practicing.
 

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I agree with the practice. Pick a place you don't want to ride to again. Then drive there and practice. That way if you embarrass yourself while you're getting better, you wont have to go back there again when you get better.
 

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Start and stop on your street. As for the stalling...whatever. The people who saw you stall aren't going to be in your life again, don't worry about them. When you are starting, don't worry about the people behind you. They can wait. Take your time, be technical and critical while starting right. Before you know it, you won't stall anymore.

Or...you can be like the guy I ride with... His road name is Stall. Can you guess why? They call me U-Turn. Can you guess why? Embrace it.
 

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Been there.

Master that friction zone!

Ride safe!
Been there, too. +1 on mastering the friction zone (we're talking about the clutch in case you have not heard the phrase before). Don't be afraid to give it a little gas (not too much, though) until you find your comfort zone. Engage the clutch slowly. Even with a lot of throttle, if you engage the the clutch slowly, you will start off smoothly. Of course, too much gas and engaging too fast: hold on!

If you haven't already, you should take the MSF Basic Rider course as soon as you can.
 

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Been there, too. +1 on mastering the friction zone (we're talking about the clutch in case you have not heard the phrase before). Don't be afraid to give it a little gas (not too much, though) until you find your comfort zone. Engage the clutch slowly. Even with a lot of throttle, if you engage the the clutch slowly, you will start off smoothly. Of course, too much gas and engaging too fast: hold on!

If you haven't already, you should take the MSF Basic Rider course as soon as you can.
+1 on the MSF course. My dad is an old school biker and told me I was wasting my time taking that class and generally made fun of me for wanting to learn about how not to die on a bike. In the end it was $50 and a weekend of my time. I felt it was a great investment that was not only fun, but a I learned a lot. I am actually planning on taking an advanced rider course here soon to see what else I can learn about these two wheeled beasts.
 

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two times I dumped my bike from a stop, both happened when I was planning to turn left from a stop and had my wheel turned and when I let out the clutch down we went, I forgot to put it in 1st gear when I stopped and the bike stalled when I let out the clutch and down she went. happened twice like that, and learned that the bike will go down when the wheel is not completely straight
 

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two times I dumped my bike from a stop, both happened when I was planning to turn left from a stop and had my wheel turned and when I let out the clutch down we went, I forgot to put it in 1st gear when I stopped and the bike stalled when I let out the clutch and down she went. happened twice like that, and learned that the bike will go down when the wheel is not completely straight
I am having a hard time picturing how you drop the bike on take off, due to the wheel being turned?

Only time I know the wheel being turned creating a hazardous situation is coming to a stop, wheel turned and grabbing too much front brake. Never do this! Always come to a stop with wheel straight and at the very end of the stop never be on the front brake, rear brake only!
 

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If you're expecting the bike to maneuver one way (turning and accelerating) but it does something completely different (turning and lugging) it's completely understandable for this to happen.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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+1 on the MSF course. My dad is an old school biker and told me I was wasting my time taking that class and generally made fun of me for wanting to learn about how not to die on a bike. In the end it was $50 and a weekend of my time. I felt it was a great investment that was not only fun, but a I learned a lot. I am actually planning on taking an advanced rider course here soon to see what else I can learn about these two wheeled beasts.
Yup Yup! Say it with me folks, MSF Course, MSF Course, MSF Course. LOL, but seriously...

I know of many people (myself included) that took the course later in life, after having years of riding experience. Every one of them (myself included) have walked away from the course learning something beneficial. The beginner has the most to gain, but it really is good for all riders to have gone through the course.
 

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If you're expecting the bike to maneuver one way (turning and accelerating) but it does something completely different (turning and lugging) it's completely understandable for this to happen.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Yeah could have swore I updated that post to reflect the scenario better. I am thinking when the bike stalled on take off in the turn he grabbed the front brake. Do that and it will go down every time. Another thing they teach in the MSF course diligently. Always straighten the wheel before grabbing front brake. It really does become instinct after a time. I dropped my tourer one time exactly like that coming to a stop (with the wife on I might add) wheel turned too much and grabbed too much front brake. That was all I needed to learn never do that again. I will use both brakes slowing down but at the end of the stop I am on the rear brake only.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Thanks for all the suggestions. I passed the MSF course 3 weeks ago, got my bike a week later bringing her home on a 73 mile trip with 0 road experience (fun ride at least), and only got to "ride" 2 other times after that. We had a heat wave here so I wasn't mentally prepared to ride in that so unfortunately, as much knowledge as I got from the MSF course, I still have not been able to learn my bike compared to the Suzuki 125s we learned on. Its been a bit frustrating but I'll figure it out somehow. I feel like I would gain much more confidence riding with someone while I iron out all my mistakes
 
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