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Discussion Starter #1
Hi. I am not new to riding. I have been riding sense a kid on dirt bikes and then onto street bikes and last year sold my 1 seater due to some things needed to get paid. Decided to buy another bike this spring and my wife showed some interest. So I got a cruiser. Question is, how to take a newbie passenger and make this work with a newbie two upper? Any advice will be awesome. Should I worry about this at all? Like I said, I have never ridden anyone on a bike before. Should slow me down. lol
 

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Starts and stops are different. Let your wife know that she isn't to "help" steer. Take it easy until you both get used to it & just ride......
 

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Give her the same safety brief I give my wife and kids:

"When I lean, lean with me. Don't move around when we're stopped. If you fall off, wait on the side of the road and I'll get you on the way back."

Seriously, though. I've only rode 2 up a few times, but like GimpyLeg said, starts and stops are different. Just take things slow until you get used to it and you should be good.
 

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When my wife first started riding with me, I told her that once her feet were on the pegs, they need to stay there until we're in a parking spot and I'm turning the bike off.

Lean with the bike and look over my inside shoulder when leaning or turning. If I'm turning left her head should be either directly behind mine or looking over my left shoulder. That keeps the weight of the bike moving toward your turn. If she leans way to the outside or shifts her weight to the outside you could miss your turn... or worse.

My wife likes a sissy bar or luggage case behind her. She is much more comfortable if something is pushing back into her... and I'm not horking around with her on the back. She just likes being able to feel that there's something behind her to help hold her on the bike.

Tell her she can move around quite a bit while you're going faster than 30 mph. She can readjust seating position much easier (for you) while moving. Below 30 mph, she should try to be as still as possible on the back seat.

Once you get into the groove of things, that 30 mph rule can be dropped down to about 5-10 mph. My wife is a master at this now. Once we're rolling I've seen her taking pictures, pointing out the sights, watching traffic, warning me of impending dangers (like a bouncing ball coming down a driveway with a kid chasing it :eek:), taking a drink, offering me one, etc.

Most of all, keep the rides short in the beginning. You can always go for 5 separate 10 mile rides and then call it quits, but if she's done after 30 miles and you're 25 miles from home... well, that last leg of the ride won't be too much fun for you. ;)


Good luck!

Bo
 

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If you're counter-steering, as opposed to leaning your body to make the bike turn, then there isn't much need to have your passenger look over your shoulder or lean with the bike (the effect of counter steering will counteract the shifting weight of the passenger). I encourage everyone to understand and practice counter-steering (you're doing it anyway, but knowing that your doing it and knowing how it works gives you tremendous control over your bike.)

Just let them no not to shift their weight much, and avoid sliding around or shifting in their seat. Also, make sure there are verbal cues before mounting/dismounting. If you're stopped and leaning slightly to the left and she decides to go ahead and hop off (shifting all her weight on the left peg to dismount) then your bike has a good chance of going down! Whenever we stop, I always say "go ahead" and she hops off, then I get off. Same with getting on, she'll ask me if I'm ready before she hops on.

It's not so bad, you'll get used to it pretty quick. Just make sure you are comfortable on your bike before you take a passenger, as it will change the dynamics of things.
 

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If you're counter-steering...
And that's it right there.

But even if you are counter-steering, if your passenger freaks out and leans away from the lean of the bike it will have a tendency to straighten back up.

I had a buddy who passed an exit on the freeway because his passenger leaned away from the off ramp. He obviously wasn't counter-steering, but even if he was it would still be easier with an agreeable passenger. :D

Bo
 

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1. BRAKING DISTANCE! Your bike will react completely differently coming to a stop. That's the number one difference in my experience.
2. When stopped, my wife had a tendency to "wobble" around, adjusting things etc....that's a no-no.
3. I was completely surprised that the bike doesn't seem to be adversely affected as far as accerleration.goes....vtwins seem to handle the extra weight effortlessly.
I can't stress the difference in braking enough though....when u ride solo for a long time you tend to get adjusted to how long it takes to come to a stop....then, all of a sudden it takes twice as long...lol This is my main piece of advice.
Regards, SH.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Thanks everyone. I am going to have my wife read this thread. You know how it goes, If I say it she will not like it much. But, if she reads other folks input, most likely, she will listen more better and see the seriousness in it all. Thanks again. I am sure we will do fine and take it slow. Ride safe everyone.
 

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Just let them no not to shift their weight much, and avoid sliding around or shifting in their seat. Also, make sure there are verbal cues before mounting/dismounting. If you're stopped and leaning slightly to the left and she decides to go ahead and hop off (shifting all her weight on the left peg to dismount) then your bike has a good chance of going down! Whenever we stop, I always say "go ahead" and she hops off, then I get off. Same with getting on, she'll ask me if I'm ready before she hops on.

It's not so bad, you'll get used to it pretty quick. Just make sure you are comfortable on your bike before you take a passenger, as it will change the dynamics of things.
Yup. I agree in full, and that's pretty rare. :)

Bascially a repeat of the above.

Passenger rule book

Executive summary:

Don't help, just sit there and enjoy the ride.

Details:

1. Don't put your feet down until it's OK to get on/off the bike.

2. Don't try to help lean, just look in the direction we're turning.

3. Don't shift around without first telling me, especially when going slow and most importantly, when stopped.

4. Don't try to get on or off the bike without first telling me, and or me acknowledging it's OK to do so.


Of course, the size of your passenger makes a pretty big difference in how the bike feels. For me, personally, I think it's easier with a passenger if you stop a little more quickly and take off a little more quickly. It's the low speeds and starting/stopping where you really notice it the most so I try to get out of those zones as reasonably quickly as possible.
 

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try hitting your floor boards or pegs on a turn. the passengers just love it!!
+1! I get a thump on the helmet if preceeved it was intentional. It usually is... :devil:
 

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The first time I ever scraped boards was with a passenger (I try not to, I figure, if I turn and lean to the point that I'm ALMOST on the boards, then if I under-estimated the curve I still have room. When you're on the boards/pegs, that's it.) It was at real low speeds too, turning right up a hill from a stop (so I wasn't really leaned that far just the surface of the road was a steep grade so it was easy to hit).

She kept looking around to see what that weird noise was! LOL
 
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Also I was told during training that you should adjust your headlight, mirrors, tyre pressures and rear suspension (if possible) as well take into consideration more space for overtaking and braking and also making sure the passenger has correct clothing, a proper helmet, how to hold on and where to put their feet. Obviously thats theoretical. Who does all that in the real world!!
 

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Also I was told during training that you should adjust your headlight, mirrors, tyre pressures and rear suspension (if possible) as well take into consideration more space for overtaking and braking and also making sure the passenger has correct clothing, a proper helmet, how to hold on and where to put their feet. Obviously thats theoretical. Who does all that in the real world!!
My suspension is adjusted for the weight when we're two up. I don't bother with adjusting it back. It doesn't bother me, it's a little stiff, but not bad... but when she's on it if it's not stiffened up it tends to bottom out. Her seat is much smaller and thinner than mine, and if momma ain't happy, ain't no-one happy!
 

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Also I was told during training that you should adjust your headlight, mirrors, tyre pressures and rear suspension (if possible) as well take into consideration more space for overtaking and braking and also making sure the passenger has correct clothing, a proper helmet, how to hold on and where to put their feet. Obviously thats theoretical. Who does all that in the real world!!
I do most of it, except the headlight. Since I rarely drive at night it doesn't cause much problem.
 

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if momma ain't happy, ain't no-one happy!
You got that right. :cool:

OP, the most important out of any of these, in my opinion, is that your pillion has to trust you with their life. If she doesn't, she will freak out when you go hard into a hairpin and you will end up in the ditch. I ask every one of my passengers directly, "Do you trust me with your life?". If they hesitate, I tell them "another time".

All of the above advice is good. I found THIS shortly after I took my girlfriend on our first ride together, and wish I would have found it sooner. Good stuff in here.
 

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There is really nothing I can add that has not been said everyone here has gave good advise. I have rode two up on my vulcan 1500 more often then not. It is harder to ride when you have someone that has no experience on the back. Some of the time they through your balance off a little bit, but never have I come even close to losing control of the bike because of it. Braking distance is longer so leave extra room for sudden stops, and like everyone said tell her to lean with the bike. Have fun and be safe
 
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