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Discussion Starter #1
From parking lots to neighborhoods to city streets, I've probably logged about an hour and a half on a few different motorcycles. (the most prominent being the 91 ninja 500 I learned on.)

And yet, all of my turns tighter than a gentle curve in the road result in a shaky 10 mph manuever trying to find a balance between holding the bike up and turning tight enough.

How do I make turning more comfortable, and how can I just get used to it? Is this going to be like most things where I just have to do it enough?
 

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BOTM Winner, December 2016
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Yep...practice !!!

Check the vid I just posted in "Funny Videos"...
 

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Go to a clover leaf during a really slow traffic time, maybe 7-8am on Sunday morn. Go around it a few times, that should help with the right turns
 

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wocka, wocka, wocka
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From parking lots to neighborhoods to city streets, I've probably logged about an hour and a half on a few different motorcycles. (the most prominent being the 91 ninja 500 I learned on.)

And yet, all of my turns tighter than a gentle curve in the road result in a shaky 10 mph manuever trying to find a balance between holding the bike up and turning tight enough.

How do I make turning more comfortable, and how can I just get used to it? Is this going to be like most things where I just have to do it enough?
furryous,, yor trying to ride yor bike instead of learning to Fly yor ride..
Numero Uno: Get your head up and and your Eyes out in front looking deep into the corner, NOT down at where you presently are and what is eminently in front of you..
Dos: You Fly with your Brain as your Eyes take in what is coming and your Body will automatically execute what it needs to do to take you there..
Tres: Quit trying to ride your bike 10ft at a time, you should be Flying it anywhere from a 100ft to 100yards out in front of you ALL the time..
Four: Relax! it will come very natural..
Cinco: TRUST yourself and Trust your bike.. it will do exactly what you want it to do.
Last: Have Fun and Enjoy it.. once you let go of yor Fear and Trust youself, you will be hooked for life. nothing is as therapeutic as long ride on a bike... thru the tite twisty benders! poncho
 

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Fury

If you haven't done so already, you might want to consider taking an MSF class. During the 2 day course you will get some excellent training on how to make turns, stops, swerves, etc. the skills they teach are great and might one day save your life.

Ride safe
 

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Fury

If you haven't done so already, you might want to consider taking an MSF class. During the 2 day course you will get some excellent training on how to make turns, stops, swerves, etc. the skills they teach are great and might one day save your life.

Ride safe
Heed Logan's advice, Fury. Best investment there is in building your confidence.
 

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BOTM Winner, June 2015
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furryous,, yor trying to ride yor bike instead of learning to Fly yor ride..
Numero Uno: Get your head up and and your Eyes out in front looking deep into the corner, NOT down at where you presently are and what is eminently in front of you..
Dos: You Fly with your Brain as your Eyes take in what is coming and your Body will automatically execute what it needs to do to take you there..
Tres: Quit trying to ride your bike 10ft at a time, you should be Flying it anywhere from a 100ft to 100yards out in front of you ALL the time..
Four: Relax! it will come very natural..
Cinco: TRUST yourself and Trust your bike.. it will do exactly what you want it to do.
Last: Have Fun and Enjoy it.. once you let go of yor Fear and Trust youself, you will be hooked for life. nothing is as therapeutic as long ride on a bike... thru the tite twisty benders! poncho
+1 on "Numero Uno". I was always taught to look ahead, about 100 ft or so, more if possible, in turns. Slow, fast, doesn't matter. It's pretty amazing how the bike does and goes where it needs to when you master this simple technique. In slower turns, if you feel like you're leaning a little too much and afeared you'll tip over, a little blip of the throttle will bring it back up more vertical, provided you aren't laying on the ground at that point.
 

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+1 on the MSF course as soon as possible.

"I've probably logged about an hour and a half on a few different motorcycles." 1 1/2 hours is not much time in the saddle especially if it has been broken up over multiple sessions and on different bikes. That's not even one good practice session. But if you are doing it wrong, you can quickly develop bad habits (like looking at the road instead of looking thru the turns) that will be hard to break.

I read a study once that concluded that you need to ride a minimum 10 hours a month just to maintain a comfortable skill level. Less than that and you spend the first few hours back on the bike getting comfortable again. So, yeah, it is one of those things that will take some time.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I'm taking an MSF course as soon as possible, but unfortunately, the way budgeting works out for that, I won't have the money until... Next spring? I have college and stuff to pay for. But you all brought up very helpful and useful points that I'll try to implement and work on going forward.
Thank you all!
 

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wocka, wocka, wocka
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yeah, this is your Dad talkin to you

I'm taking an MSF course as soon as possible, but unfortunately, the way budgeting works out for that, I won't have the money until... Next spring? I have college and stuff to pay for. But you all brought up very helpful and useful points that I'll try to implement and work on going forward.
Thank you all!
furry, how much is the class?.. if at all possible, is ther someone you know, fambly, that can loan you that fee? its not about you. its about everyone else who cares and is somehow needing you to stick around for a while, a long while.. if you was in my hood, I'd hook you up.. don't put this off. yor life is on the line here.
I took a basic and advance course a dozen or more so years ago.. I will say that I learned more in 3 hours of classroom time than I had learned in over 30yrs of hard riding maybe to the toon of half mil miles..
Yeah, its that much diff!.. I have ridden with 100x more confidence since, skill sets and zero accidents.. cant quite say that for b4 the class... get yer butt down there pronto and get er dun! ponchout
 

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I am still fairly a new rider (2 years?). I remember on my MSF course, one of the things that the instructors kept kelly out was "Head and eyes up". He kept saying as well "you bike hasn't change colors, stop looking down at it" lol...

I found the idea of looking at with you want to go in turns helps. The moment you eyes avert downwards you will start to oversteer. It also sounds like you are trying to steer your turn and haven't gotten the hang of push steering yet on your turns. This was hard for me I recall but I just had to trust myself and do it and after 30 minutes it was second nature. I was amazed how after 1 hour of solid riding with the instructors giving us tips that I was pretty confident zooming around the course (well confident as in 30-40 kph lol).

Good luck.
 

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Ponchos story is not unique. I know so many riders who rode for YEARS and felt like the MSF course was the biggest improvement to their riding. Find a way to take the course; it is ESSENTIAL. And it may pay for itself with insurance discounts. Heed his advice on this one. Take the course.

You've gotten good advice to the thread.

Did I mention take the MSF course?

Also, you should really consider taking the MSF course.

Okay, being serious now... take the MSF course!

Low speed maneuvers are scary at first. Look where you go, and that's exactly where you'll go. And don't be afraid of your throttle. Sometimes creeping too slowly is what really ties up new riders. Speed makes a bike stable. Definitely not suggesting a 70mph U-Turn, but use your throttle and your clutch. Find a big open parking lot to practice everything you learned in the MSF course, and use that throttle and clutch to control the bike. Adding throttle to stabilize the bike when it feels shaky.

The best part of the MSF course, aside from just the fantastic wisdom imparted; is that you get to practice on someone elses bike. When my wife took the MSF course she dropped the little Buell they gave her so many times she finally broke it and they had to get her another one. No harm no foul! She got it done. And before the class was over she was doing peg-dragging figure 8's. Practice on THEIR stuff, not yours.

The biggest testament I have to the MSF really is my wife. I took it after I had been riding a bit. Though I actually read through the book and MSF manual before ever riding. (I also recommend reading "Proficient Motorcycling" by David Hough). My wife wanted her own so we signed her up for the MSF course and bought a bike. Coincidentally, the bike got here before a seat in the MSF course did. She tried her little Honda in a parking lot and was shaky and nervous, couldn't handle the turns, so we decided to wait until after the MSF course. One weekend at the MSF course and she hopped on that Honda, did some figure 8's and U-Turns in a parking lot to get her 'sea legs' and she hit the road. Like she had been riding her whole life. It's THAT GOOD of a course.

Lookup motorcycle organizations in your area, especially affiliated with groups like ABATE. Some offer discounted, or even free MSF courses. Not always, but it's worth looking into. But it'll be the best money you've spent. Also, don't be afraid to travel for the course to save a buck. My wife did it at the Harley dealer because it was close to her work and she could go after work and make it on time, and it was like $400. My course was only $250 done elsewhere; and it's the exact same course. The Harley-Davidson "riders edge" just adds a little bit of H-D propaganda (they toured the dealership and sat on some bikes, and learned some of H-D's history). I think you can get them to toss the course in if you buy a bike, I dunno. But otherwise, there's no advantage to the "Riders Edge" course over another MSF course elsewhere.
 

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I'll jump in on the "take the MSF" mantra, too.

After riding a lot as a teen/young adult (mostly off-road and local motocross), I didn't touch a bike again until four months ago...a span of over thirty years. Could I have jumped on the Vulcan I wound up buying and kept it upright? Absolutely. But Florida has this pesky little requirement for a motorcycle endorsement: you must go through the MSF. Since I didn't want to ride outlaw and the insurance company wouldn't cover the bike without the endorsement, I had to take it.

Best thing I ever did. Probably has saved my life twice already.

There isn't a time that I go out that something my instructor taught me doesn't pop through my mind. I'm fond of my own skin and would have been trying to ride safe without the MSF; now, I'm ATTGATT and thinking safety even more so.

Last month, I managed to dump the bike in a slow turn. Ran off the road and then fell over at about 10mph. I had a video camera on my helmet on that ride. When I went back and looked at the video, it was obvious that I had failed to look through the turn, got focused on the shoulder, and rode right over onto it. Exactly the opposite of what the MSF taught. Even though I got out of that with a bruised ego and a couple of scratches on the bike, I was able to learn and analyze because of the MSF.

So, do it. Crowdfund your tuition if you need to. It's that important.
 

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As Ponch says look where you are going, not where you are. Keep your eyes moving and ahead of you especially on curves and turns.
Others call it look where you want to go.
 

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Yeah, beg borrow or steal the funds to take the class. The way you learn this stuff the first time will stay with you for a long time. Best to do it right from the start.
 

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wocka, wocka, wocka
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Yeah, beg borrow or steal the funds to take the class. The way you learn this stuff the first time will stay with you for a long time. Best to do it right from the start.
yeah I hear its like golfing b4 and after lessons (not that I would kno) but if you golf w/o learning how, then you spend the rest of your life trying to un'learn all the bad habits you cemented..

head up and look where you want to go. is not just for motorcycling. they teach this in downhill skiing class. if you find yourself in the trees. don't look at the trees, look between them.
where you look is where you go. look at a tree and you will hit it for sure.
ps. stay the fk outa the trees!
 
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