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Discussion Starter #1
Just noticed that the right turn signal on my 2012 Classic LT flashes about twice as fast as the left turn signal. Checked to see that all the bulbs were working when I got home - they are. Is this a feature or a bug (and if it's a "feature" - why?) ?
 

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Switch the bulbs, does the flashing switch also ? If so, match the specs on the bulb that flashes correctly. If both bulbs have identical specs then you probably have something in the wiring causing a different current flow (a bad joint, connector).
 

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^ what they said

switch the fronts, if same result, switch the rears, if same result it's wiring/a short

if the fast flash changes when you switch the bulb side buy a new bulb :)
 

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The quick flashing blinkers on the 900 are a recurring issue.

Most of the time it's a poor contact from bulb to socket and the fix is to clean the inside of the socket and the bulb then put a VERY thin layer of di-electric grease on the socket.

But quick flashing is a 'feature'. If a bulb is about to go out it will blink fast to indicate a problem.

Scott
 

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The quick flashing blinkers on the 900 are a recurring issue.

Most of the time it's a poor contact from bulb to socket and the fix is to clean the inside of the socket and the bulb then put a VERY thin layer of di-electric grease on the socket.

But quick flashing is a 'feature'. If a bulb is about to go out it will blink fast to indicate a problem.

Scott
Scott I've wondered, is it the Turn Signal Control relay on a Kawa that implements this "feature" ? I know on a Harley the ECU actually monitors the current on the signal lines and if it doesn't meet pre-programmed criteria it implements the faster flashing. But I've never read anything that explained what actually happens in the Nomad manual.
 

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I've always understood that the flasher requires a certain amount of 'load' to flash correctly. If that load is altered (such as resistance from a dirty socket or a bad bulb), then the flasher won't work as designed. Kinda like, if you're in 5th gear and have the throttle perfectly in the middle the bike is gonna go 'x' speed. But if you start going up or downhill as resistance changes; but you don't adjust the throttle, the speed will change.

Also; bulbs can go bad but still work. Are the runnings lights working? It may blink, but what about just the running light? It's also possible for bulbs to still be working but have something internally wrong to upset that load. I'd clean and grease the sockets, and if that doesn't work, just replace the bulb. ($2 at the hardware store!)
 

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I've always understood that the flasher requires a certain amount of 'load' to flash correctly. If that load is altered (such as resistance from a dirty socket or a bad bulb), then the flasher won't work as designed. <. . . . . . .>
That may in fact be all that's happening, I know it was as you say with my older cars, the flasher itself just reacted to line current on it's own. However some of the newer ECM (PCMs etc) actually implement varied flash sequences based on line current read.

From what I've read in my Kawa manual, it appears to be the Turn Signal Control relay only involved. Either circuit implementation or as Romans said just reacting on it's own to ohms law basics.
 

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That may in fact be all that's happening, I know it was as you say with my older cars, the flasher itself just reacted to line current on it's own. However some of the newer ECM (PCMs etc) actually implement varied flash sequences based on line current read.

From what I've read in my Kawa manual, it appears to be the Turn Signal Control relay only involved. Either circuit implementation or as Romans said just reacting on it's own to ohms law basics.
As far as I know, from seeing the wiring in the service manual and such; hitting the switch applies current to the flasher (a basic 'universal' flasher type unit) which then applies current to the turn signal. The ECU or any other digital component is absent from that circuit. It's pretty basic as I understand it and a reason the flasher needs to be replaced when LED's are installed.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Many thanks for the responses.

First I went out and just turned on the ignition w/o starting the bike - problem was the same - right turn signal doing a "fast flash". Removed the front right bulb, then the front left bulb - both appeared to be fine. Switched them so that the former right bulb was now on the left side etc. And the problem was fixed - no fast flash on either side. Guessing it was a contact issue (from the answers you guys gave).

Thank you again... probably ought to road test it, eh? Good reason to go get some wind therapy. ;):D
 

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As far as I know, from seeing the wiring in the service manual and such; hitting the switch applies current to the flasher (a basic 'universal' flasher type unit) which then applies current to the turn signal. The ECU or any other digital component is absent from that circuit. It's pretty basic as I understand it and a reason the flasher needs to be replaced when LED's are installed.
I looked at my Nomad wiring diagrams and I agree, on the Kawa that seems to be the case. I also dug out my old dusty Harley manual that I haven't seen in awhile. The flash sequence on the Harley does the exact same thing, in other words the flasher itself is reacting to the current difference. The ECU only monitors the line for sending err codes (if one was to read them on a diagnostic test).

Many thanks for the responses. < . . . . > Switched them so that the former right bulb was now on the left side etc. And the problem was fixed - no fast flash on either side. Guessing it was a contact issue . . . . . .
Glad you got it fixed, probably corrosion on the contacts. Wouldn't hurt to spray a little electric cleaner lube in there (or wipe some dielectric) to prevent future issues.
 
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