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Discussion Starter #1
Hey all,

Have an 06' Vulcan Classic LT, all stock. It will sit for up to 5 days between rides. Do I need to hook up a trickle charger? Are they really necessary?

Thanks,

Wes
 

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If the battery is in good shape sitting five days should be fine.A battery maintainer is a good investment though.Hopefully the battery is not still the original,if so it could fail at any time.
 

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The Deltran "Battery Tender Plus" is a great one.If I remember correctly it comes with a ten year warranty.I have had mine (I have the "Plus "and the "Junior") about that long and it has always worked without fail.I see Walmart and the home Depot are both selling these units now.
 

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Just keep in mind that a 'trickle charger' is different than a 'battery tender' even though sometimes people use the terms interchangeable. You want a 'battery tender' which is automatic and shuts itself off.

The basic science is anything below 12.4v can begin a process of internal corrosion called sulfation. The goal for long battery life is to keep the voltage topped up at all times. 5 days shouldn't be a problem but batteries aren't very consistent or very good quality. The overwhelming majority of lead acid batteries are smelted, or produced using components from, countries where labor and manufacturing practices are loosely regulated. Fact is, lead acid batteries suck. But there's not much of a market for anything better. Most consumers seem to prefer replacing haphazardly made lead acid batteries as a disposable item than purchasing FAR more expensive batteries, which ARE on the market but are not popular (they will last longer and be far more consistent). The inconsistency is why I generally use a tender almost every day. It won't hurt anything (unless it pushes the battery beyond the outgassing voltage but they are designed not to); and it'll afford some insurance in case you have some sort of an unusual draw or just a less reliable battery. Though constant tender use does have the potential side affect of masking battery failures. i.e., a battery that won't hold a charge starting fine because it was on a tender, but being dead when you leave the restaurant and head back on the bike!

If you really want a reliable, long lasting battery; and don't mind forking out for it, check out these: http://shoraipower.com/products?action=vehicle&type=175&make=222974&model=223739&year=223739

Or other brands of LiFePO4 batteries. They still need to be on a tender during any long term storage (and ideally a lithium specific one, but a standard tender will work); but will last a long longer and more consistently. (i.e., take a batch of 10 lithium batteries and 10 SLA batteries, the 10 lithium will last much closer to the same amount of time, and the 10 SLA batteries will be all over the place, maybe one lasts 10 years and one failed after 9 months under the same conditions)
 

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The Deltran "Battery Tender Plus" is a great one.If I remember correctly it comes with a ten year warranty.I have had mine (I have the "Plus "and the "Junior") about that long and it has always worked without fail.I see Walmart and the home Depot are both selling these units now.
Yeah these are real good. If your battery is ok however it will sit for months without an issue although I've heard that they last longer if kept on a tender.
 

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Yeah these are real good. If your battery is ok however it will sit for months without an issue although I've heard that they last longer if kept on a tender.
Yep. Just because it starts after sitting doesn't indicate that the battery is healthy or was properly stored. The bike may still crank over just fine even after the battery has been allowed to dip well into the internal corrosion range (below 12.4v). That corrosion will continue to build until there is not enough capacity in the battery left to start the bike; or it could cause an internal short (when that happens, it's usually not a slow-crank, or a battery that needs boosting; but a totally dead battery, no lights, nothing; often when 200 miles from home!)
 

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I run mine on a tender ... 24 /7 ... 365 ... my 900 is a 08 .... 6 plus years, same battery which came with the bike with no issues .... the only time I do not use a tender is when I am on trips.
 

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If you buy one try to get one that is made to keep the AGM style batteries charged up as that type will also work on a lead acid type battery. If you buy a regular one for lead acid batteries it is not good to use that type on an AGM battery as it will ruin the battery and most like ruin the charger also.
 

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If you buy one try to get one that is made to keep the AGM style batteries charged up as that type will also work on a lead acid type battery. If you buy a regular one for lead acid batteries it is not good to use that type on an AGM battery as it will ruin the battery and most like ruin the charger also.
AGM batteries ARE lead acid batteries. The acid is just absorbed into fiberglas. Both have the exact same chemical makeup. There's no difference between the two when it comes to charging. The only difference between non-AGM and AGM batteries is that AGM batteries have fiberglas mats in them to prevent out-gassing and resist internal corrosion. Chargers/tenders that are labeled for AGM batteries are labeled as such just to play into owners confusion. What works for one will work for another. Your bike has an insanely crude, rudimentary charging system, and it works just fine!

Traditional lead acid:


AGM battery:


Not much difference except some fiberglas. And AGM batteries are generally sealed or have valves to prevent water loss (you also don't/can't refill them)

Still six 2-volt cells suspended in an acid solution with lead plates.
 

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Yeah well the AGM battery can be easily overcharged with a regular charger. A friend of mine ruined two perfectly good AGM batteries on his regular charger because the charger over charged them and cooked the hell out of them. Just let the guy get the correct charger or send him some of your cash to buy him a new battery after he cooks the new one with an old style charger. I seen it done two times so I know it happens. I don't care what your thoughts are or how much you post because an AGM battery is more sensitive to being ruined so they make a type of charger that will not over cook them. I can argue this all year long until my melanoma cancer kills me so go ahead make my day. I need something to burn off steam and it is always here on this site. There is a few here who just think they know it all so go "Get R Done" and we will see. You can contradict my posts all the time I do not give a damn! I will stick by what I know works and should be used.

Here is something you can all go read then you might be able to see where i am coming from. I don't just go around here tossing out things I am not sure of.

http://www.morganscloud.com/2010/09/04/agm-battery-chargers/
 

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Your friend probably wasn't using an automatic charger or tender. He was probably using a 'standard' charger which will cook ANY battery if left alone. They aren't meant to be left on. Automatic tenders and the like shut off when the battery is charged and simply can't cook them. AGM batteries don't vent so they are more susceptible to overheating; but any automatic tender will correct for that, regardless of what type of battery it is. There's nothing electrically different about the two. Both sulphate below 12.4v, both have 6 2 volt cells with lead plates.

They work exactly the same. They put out the same power. Automatic tenders work the same regardless of which battery you're using, just like your bikes electrical system can't "sense" what kind of battery you've got in it and is feeding juice the exact same way whether it's a lead acid, sealed lead acid (AGM), or LiFEPO4 battery. (Now the latter, LiFEPO4, should use a specific charger. But it can handle your bikes charging system).
 

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Well that's the same point I want to get across too. Get the right type of a charger for it so you don't burn it up. Easy Peasy!
 

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Well that's the same point I want to get across too. Get the right type of a charger for it so you don't burn it up. Easy Peasy!
The "right type" has NOTHING to do with whether it's an AGM lead acid battery or a standard lead acid battery (earlier you didn't even seem to understand both were lead acid). The chargers ARE the same, and you should be using an automatic charger on either type; ideally, a tender that won't heat it up (generally 1 amp). Regardless of battery type. After all, both are the same type of battery- lead acid. The only difference is the fiberglas in AGM batteries which helps them resist corrosion and outgassing.
 

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I'm out gassing right now over this deal! HAHA!

And waiting on the Easter Bunny after Church this Sunday!
 

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^^^^^^ hahahaah to funny
 

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Discussion Starter #20
This is one I had on my last bike.. thought I sold it with the bike but apparently not.... Think its a good one?

[ame]http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0066FZU12/ref=olp_product_details?ie=UTF8&me=[/ame]

Schumacher SP2 1 Amp Battery Charger/Maintainer
 
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