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Discussion Starter #1
Can I tow my Voyager with a receiver hitch with the rear wheel on ground? I wonder if the transmission would be lubricated?:)
 

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You can, buy why would you? I guess if you have a car tire on the rear you won't have to worry about creating a flat spot.

I am assuming you are talking about towing it further than down to the local mechanic.
 

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You can, buy why would you? I guess if you have a car tire on the rear you won't have to worry about creating a flat spot.

I am assuming you are talking about towing it further than down to the local mechanic.
cross country, why would it cause a flat spot on rear tire?:)
 

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Cant see the wear on the tire being any different than riding it. Would probably be less due to reduced weight and no braking or accelerating forces on the tire.
 

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I wouldn't do it for the simple reason of tire wear. There are thousands of threads on this forum and every other motorcycle forum about poor rear tire longevity. If I wear out a rear tire I want it to be with my butt in the saddle, not following me down the road hanging off the back of my car/truck. But, that's just me.
 

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Most trailer tires rot long before they show any treadwear.
 

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BOTM Winner, April 2013
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Most trailer tires rot long before they show any treadwear.
What does trailer tire wear have to do with the price of tea in China?

As far as a flat spot in the tire caused by towing, I believe towing across the country WILL cause a flat spot. It is much different than riding, because while being towed, the bike will never lean into corner. It will stay upright, putting all the wear in the center of the tread.
 

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Your picture shows a Harley Davidson being towed, which has a separate transmission from the crankcase with it's own lubrication oil. Distributed on the gears by an oil slinger.
The Kawasaki has an internal transmission combined with the crankcase, lubricated by the oil pump, which will not be turning when towing the bike. I would not recommend towing.
 

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If you go this route be aware of these issues....

If I was going to tow mine that far I think I'd invest in a cheap HF trailer and haul the bike on it.
I've done this. The HF trailer is serviceable but has its issues. First, it is only 8 feet long and rather high off the ground which makes loading the bike a bit difficult (very steep incline when you tilt the trailer) unless you have a loading ramp for on and off. Second, it is built in two pieces which means that if you hit a hard bump it can bend in the middle. Had that happen to me. Also, the stock 12 inch tires are only rated for 55 mph. I bought new 13 inch rims and tires, but that takes away from some of the savings from the cheap trailer.

Also, if you put eye-hooks on it to tie down the bike, buy the forged ones for marine use. They are a lot tougher. I had a standard eye-hook break on me when I hit that big bump I mentioned above.

If I do it again I will look for a used 10 foot trailer that is lower to the ground. Put new wood flooring on it, especially under the bike, and make sure the bearings and tires are serviceable.
 

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wocka, wocka, wocka
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1st thing you would want to do IF you trailer this way is take the Belt OFF the bike, secure it away from the rotating tire and pulley. It keeps your belt and pulley(s) and entire drive train and engine from rotation and wear lube or no lube.
Only the tire and rear wheel bearings are getting UNDULY excessive wear.
You have more weight on the rear than under normal riding condition regardless of what you think you have on the tongue. and you expose your bike to all kinds of nasty things that come off the back of your tow vehicle.

if your just trying to pull it for cheap bux, (not too smart as you have a lot of investment in that bike) ther are dozens of cheap trailers for the cost of 2 mc tires.

and I imagine backing up would be not kind to your bike steering head, etc..
 

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wocka, wocka, wocka
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I dont believe watt am seeing.. is that road king (850lb) being tethered by two straps affixed to the 1/2"dia hiway lite bar?? omg! I can just see this thing taking leave of the tow vehicle at speed down the interstate. Question is how long it remained upright.. and in its lane b4 drifting into oncoming traffic or going end over arse end in the ditch!?

just imagine your riding your bike down the hiway and you get passed by a rather fancy roadking w/o a rider aboard. after you shake it off that it isn't yor vision has gone bad or mebbe that nasty lunch you had is working its voodoo.. what could have become of its pilot? perhaps he fell asleep and off the bike? mebbe got raptured and this is his last gift to rest of us who dont ascribe to bailing out of airplanes.. do you go chase it and attempt to rescue it.. or just monitor it till it loses momentum and then bites the gravel?
 

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All I'm saying is that the pictures show it has been done & I assume with success.
As for myself, I wouldn't do it that way if I couldn't ride it to where ever.
If it couldn't be ridden then I'm sure I would rent a full trailer.
 

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Most trailer tires rot long before they show any treadwear.
If you never use them. Same is true for bikes, cars, bicycles, wheelbarrows, etc.

What does trailer tire wear have to do with the price of tea in China?

As far as a flat spot in the tire caused by towing, I believe towing across the country WILL cause a flat spot. It is much different than riding, because while being towed, the bike will never lean into corner. It will stay upright, putting all the wear in the center of the tread.
Ding, Ding, Ding! Give that man a kewpie doll! :D
 

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I dont believe watt am seeing.. is that road king (850lb) being tethered by two straps affixed to the 1/2"dia hiway lite bar??
Actually there are three straps. One is around the front wheel strapping it to the frame of the tow rig.

I know someone that used a very similar outfit. It ruined his fork seals on his trip towing it from central Nevada to Longview Texas. About 1,500 miles. It seemed the angle of the way the motorcycle sits, the rake angle due to it not actually sitting on the ground, and the angle produced into the forks during sharp 90 degree turns like driving through towns from the straps and position of the tow rig, produces a lot of lateral pressure on the fork tubes and both his shock seals were blown when he got to Texas. He rented a trailer on the return trip. It was on a Yamaha Venture. I now would not consider a set up like that. It is not like a trailer, it's towing plane it not flat. The motorcycle still wanted to lean in a turn putting pressure on everything.
 

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1st thing you would want to do IF you trailer this way is take the Belt OFF the bike, secure it away from the rotating tire and pulley. It keeps your belt and pulley(s) and entire drive train and engine from rotation and wear lube or no lube.
Now that's a very good idea if you're going to tow it that way.
But like you said, the backing up could be a nightmare.
 

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Why would you ever need to get in a situation that would need you to back up? But it should be doable just like a short trailer would be. Or just drop it and get re-arrange in the direction you need to go and put it back on.
 

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Roger that!
 

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Tow it?

I bought the Voyager to ride it. I think 1,500 miles would be great (if you had a few days). The wife wants to tow the bike to the west coast - I plan on picking her up at the airport.
 
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