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BOTM Winner, October 2015
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In another part of the forum some guy said i seriously de-valued my used stock pipes cutting out two baffle plates in the last foot of the system. I dont really care about that. Any other disadvantage? It's just two little plates in each factory pipe.



It sounds a bit better than the nearly silent "pfff pfff pfff" of the factory exhaust.

The other photos are at http://www.vulcanforums.com/forums/showthread.php?t=111241
 

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In another part of the forum some guy said i seriously de-valued my used stock pipes cutting out two baffle plates in the last foot of the system. I dont really care about that. Any other disadvantage? It's just two little plates in each factory pipe.



It sounds a bit better than the nearly silent "pfff pfff pfff" of the factory exhaust.

The other photos are at http://www.vulcanforums.com/forums/showthread.php?t=111241
I did the same on my Classic and I was very happy with the sound until the first time the bike was fully warmed up and I let off on the throttle. It resulted in a high pitched whistle/flutter every time I let off on the throttle abruptly. The only way I was able to fix this was by jamming perforated 1.375" diameter "crumb cups" (for use in sink drains) into the position formerly occupied by the first of two baffle plates in each muffler.

It also resulted in much more noticeable decel popping until I found the proper setting on my Bully/EJK to compensate. A Green/Blue (fourth setting) of .5 or 1 is required rather than the recommended setting of 6 in order to add enough fuel just off idle to stop the popping.

You don't want to know what a single replacement muffler costs from Kawasaki, and used 1700 Classic Mufflers in good/unmodified condition are rare as hen's teeth and commanding high prices. I wasted a lot of money on a used set that another forum member claimed were "undamaged". So, yes, you did seriously devalue the price of your stock mufflers by modifying them, but only if you ever thought of selling them. In good/unmodified condition you could easily get between $300 and $450 dollars for the pair.

So, if I had known about this in advance I would never have done this mod, or perhaps, I would have stopped after just removing the first baffle plate in each muffler. I did make several forum requests in advance to find out about potential draw-backs and no-one mentioned the potential for whistling. It was only after I had modified my pipes that one other 1700 owner admitted that whistling occurred on his bike too :(
 

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BOTM Winner, October 2015
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Discussion Starter #3
I did the same on my Classic and I was very happy with the sound until the first time the bike was fully warmed up and I let off on the throttle. It resulted in a high pitched whistle/flutter every time I let off on the throttle abruptly. So, if I had known about this in advance I would never have done this mod, or perhaps....:(
Crap.

I cannot undo what I've done. Before I got started I read all re-read info about this mod here and elsewhere. No bad news anywhere. I sure hope I don't find myself shoving sink parts up my pipes.

Thanks for the info.

:mad:


-Cheech
 

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Crap.

I cannot undo what I've done. Before I got started I read all re-read info about this mod here and elsewhere. No bad news anywhere. I sure hope I don't find myself shoving sink parts up my pipes.

Thanks for the info.

:mad:


-Cheech
Cheech,

Hopefully you won't get the chirping...like the 1700 Classics, it is a rare occurance. But with my sort of luck, those rare/bad things seem more common in my life :(

Case in point: I was one of the few who had the misfortune of owning a 2004 Roadstar 1700 that had a wicked KNOCK like a Cummins Deisel AND Sticky Valves.
 

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I did it to my Voyager and have not had one problem. Noise output increased a very tiny amount and I'm guessing the bike is breathing a bit easier.
 

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BOTM Winner, October 2015
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Discussion Starter #7
..Noise output increased a very tiny amount and I'm guessing the bike is breathing a bit easier.
Great news. thanks flatop and wbilotta. It's been colder than a a bucket of penguin poop here and I have not done much more than run it out on the nearby road for a few mins.

Sound output changed but not by much.
 

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I left the black tips and black end plates that are rivot on, but used a hole saw to go through 4 baffle walls (2 in each muffler). Sound improved but still quite not what I was after. So took off mufflers and drilled apart cats, gutted them, used air line to blow left over metal and extension magnet to clean rest of cut up cat out of muffler. Liked sound even better, though upon inspection of how the head pipe is, I did not like how the design of it was. So restrictive in the design.

So after a few months, sound improved some, became more deeper and started sounded like a V-Twin engine. But no matter how much I modded the mufflers, I could never achieve that real V-Twin sound @ idle..just wasn't there. So this winter went all in on brand new full exhaust with nice flowing headers and no restriction in the pipe. Bought a auto tuner with the exhaust and my VN1700 sounds so great now even at idle.

With stock mufflers modded, where as tearing out first baffle and breaking off rivots on tips, it sounds like garbage. The mufflers are so big that the sound just gives off this weird higher pitch sound that just does not sound like a tradional V-Twin engine. Plus yes, it does ruin the pipe cosmetically with having those huge open ends and being able to see in them and seeing it was modded, with broke off welds still on the inside.
 

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BOTM Winner, October 2015
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Discussion Starter #9
I did it to my Voyager and have not had one problem. Noise output increased a very tiny amount and I'm guessing the bike is breathing a bit easier.
For what it's worth I have now put about 4,500 miles on since modding in March. I like the slightly increased sound. It's not loud, I can still talk with my passenger just fine.

I'd love a big three overhaul but my ex-wife seems to get all my money. So for now this will do. I really really like this bike.
 

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some guy said i seriously de-valued my used stock pipes cutting out two baffle plates in the last foot of the system.
Just wondering why anyone would care what you do with your stuff. I have given away dozens of expensive exhaust systems I did not like after I got them. I guess it's all about the money for some people when it comes to taking things off your scoot. To me... if you take anything stock off, or something you added and took off, then it is worthless to you so you might as well just give it away.....
 

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I did a partial debaffle and I think it sounds great, even at idle. Even my Hardley buddies say it sounds good.
 

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BOTM Winner, October 2015
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Discussion Starter #13
Tools were just my cordless drill, a 1 1/4" (29mm) hole saw on a 12" extension and a flashlight.






These are the two small pieces out of one of the pipes.

 

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I did the exact same thing that Chicago_Cheech did but my drill was yellow ;)
I was wondering if any one has gone in for the third set.
I understand the right side is easy peasy, but it just seems ill advised to do one side without the other.... balance?
 

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I did the exact same thing that Chicago_Cheech did but my drill was yellow ;)
I was wondering if any one has gone in for the third set.
I understand the right side is easy peasy, but it just seems ill advised to do one side without the other.... balance?
I dont think it would be an issue since both cylinders are tied to the same pipes, except for the classics that have dedicated pipe for each cylinder. Some have done all baffles on the right but only 2 on the left with no problems.
 

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There is one significant advantage to going this route as opposed to buying new slip ons, which I think a lot of people are overlooking, for here in the UK at least.

The original pipes comes with the legal markings on them to show that they are road legal. In Europe this is an 'e' mark. Although not required for the yearly road worthy inspection, they are required to comply with the laws involved with using a vehicle on a road, and if stopped and checked by the police, then you can be fined or even have your bike impounded in the extreme cases if it doesn't have the marks and is really loud.

Although it is also an offence to alter any exhaust system to be more noisy than standard, you could, if done carefully and neatly, end up with a nice throaty exhaust, that isn't offencesive noise wise, with a legal stamp on it, that 99% of people wouldn't know had been modified from standard, thus avoiding too much attention from the boys in blue, or black, or whatever they wear these days.
 

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BOTM Winner, October 2015
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Discussion Starter #18 (Edited)
..The original pipes comes with the legal markings on them to show that they are road legal. In Europe this is an 'e' mark. .

Good point. Whether you agree with it or not, many US states and communities have something along the lines of EPA stamp enforcement. Anti-tampering looks like it is included on most of the noise-level statutes for motorcycles. I made my small mod b/c I had no money for pipes. I like it and put about 6,000 miles on it since doing it in March. Bike is still pretty quiet.
 
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