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Well, bike was running great. 1. Stopped and fueled up.
2. Backfired when I hit the starter.
3. Missed real bad all the way home (50 miles). Thought I had some carbon on a plug due to the backfire.
4. Changed plugs. 5.
Still missing an popping an not revving up.
6. Checked my fuel and found mostly water in tank. I missed the symptom of bad fuel due to it backfired and missed instantly after the fuel up. My mind told me it wasn't the fuel because it happened so quick. Guess I am getting old! Any way, I am in the wind again. Should hit the BIG 5 0 (50,000 miles) by the 1st week of March. Maybe I will send a photo when she hits 50K.

Moral of the story "REMEMBER THE BASICS---spark, fuel, and air.
 

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Shortdog, are you saying that you paid some $15 for a tankfull of mostly water?? That sounds scary. Not because of the $15, but rather that one can get such garbage at a pump...
 

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Well, bike was running great. 1. Stopped and fueled up.
2. Backfired when I hit the starter.
3. Missed real bad all the way home (50 miles). Thought I had some carbon on a plug due to the backfire.
4. Changed plugs. 5.
Still missing an popping an not revving up.
6. Checked my fuel and found mostly water in tank. I missed the symptom of bad fuel due to it backfired and missed instantly after the fuel up. My mind told me it wasn't the fuel because it happened so quick. Guess I am getting old! Any way, I am in the wind again. Should hit the BIG 5 0 (50,000 miles) by the 1st week of March. Maybe I will send a photo when she hits 50K.

Moral of the story "REMEMBER THE BASICS---spark, fuel, and air.
Report the station to your state government consumer affairs and to the weights and measures agency. Most states will just file it but if there are other complaints they may look into it.
 

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I'm curious, how does one check their fuel to detect the presence of water?
My grandad used something called Kolor Kut to see if water was getting in the underground fuel tank at the farm. It is a paste you put on a stick and then submerge to the bottom of the tank. The paste changes color when it hits water. This was a bigger deal with an underground tank. On a bike you will need to let the bike sit still for a couple minutes until the water settles to the bottom. Then the bottom of the stick should change color if there is water. Another way is to drain the tank into a see through container. You can then see the water settle in the bottom. It will usually be orangish, but there will be a distinct line where the gas and water will separate.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I'm curious, how does one check their fuel to detect the presence of water?

Try this---Take a cup or so of fuel from a gas can---pour it in a clean oil drain pan---let it settle---and look at it close---then add a little water ---let it settle---look at it close---you will see the water floating around in the fuel.

Just like when you have oil on your hands and get them wet---all the little beads of water stand out.
 
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