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Discussion Starter #1
First, dayum can a tire go quickly. My rear tire was showing some wear at my last close inspection 535 miles ago when I cleaned & lubed the chain. It was clearly not looking like a factory fresh tire but it had tread and looked plenty healthy. But that is most decidedly not the case now. I sat down to clean & lube the chain today and discovered that I have exposed steel belt along the entire length of the center of the tire and another strip exposed an inch or so to the left of that. The right side isn't as bad but the tread is all but gone and I'd imagine I'm not far from exposing some belt there as well. Wow did that sneak up on me.

So, clearly the tire needs to be replaced before I ride again and that leads to my question. I've read several of the threads that discuss tire options and I think I'll go with a Pirelli Angel as the replacement. Question is whether I need to replace the front tire as well even though it has PLENTY of tread and shows little wear or if it's ok to leave the original Dunlop on the front.

And just so you know I do enjoy riding somewhat aggressively...I'm not one to scrape pegs but I do enjoy pushing it through the twisties from time to time.

As this is my first bike so I have no personal experience to rely on here I'm hoping the experienced riders in the community can offer their thoughts and experience on the topic. Seems to me that I should be able to keep the front tire but perhaps there are forces at work I've not considered.

Thanks
 

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I'd replace the front too with an Angel GT. They grip the road as well as ride and handle so much better than the stock Dunlops especially in the twisties. I'm currently on my second set of Angel GT's headed for a third soon I like them so much. Down side is they only last around 4,000 miles if you're often aggressive on them (as I am), if not could probably get another 1 -2K out of them.
 

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The subject of motorcycle tires is an interesting one as there are more things to think about compared to a car tire. Motorcycle tires are softer than car tires, for instances.

Age is a definite factor, too. What I urge you to do is get online and start researching about how tire age affects a motorcycle tire. You can also find online how to decipher the codes that are on the side of every tire manufactured (car or bike) so you can determine how old your tires are. Its possible to get a brand new motorcycle with tires already a few years old. Its also possible that you can buy new tires but the ones you get may be a couple of years old before they roll one inch in distance.

Once armed with this new information you can make your own determination as to how long to keep your tires, based purely upon age. Tread wear is only a part of the story as age can do a tire in as quickly as running over a brick.

Some people will keep tires 10 years whereas other people swap them out after 5 years, regardless of tread wear. You can decide on your own, for yourself which viewpoint you wish to follow.

For me, (once I discovered that this subject even existed) I tend to lean towards the lower end of the age scale. That was one factor in determining that I wanted my new tires to be Shinko TourMaster 230's. They provide excellent road handling abilities (for my sedate, cruiser type of riding), are inexpensive, but tend to have shorter total mileage life expectancies. This works out for me as I didn't see a reason to buy tires expected to go forever since I don't get in 5K or more miles per year but always do quite a bit less. I'd run out of my personal allowed time limit before I reach a mileage limit. Why change a tire out for age when there is tons of good tread left? So the Shinko's made sense for me.

You said you ride aggressively. I'd think the Shinko's aren't really for you then. The people over in the Kawasaki World forum (almost all sportsbike people) don't like the Shinko's because that group of people are more prone to being aggressive riders and they say the Shinko's don't hold up well for that brand of riding. I'll have to take them at their word for that evaluation.

To answer your question about the front tire: Yes, I would change the front, too. If nothing else this keeps both of them on the same swap-out schedule and is easier to keep track of in your mind as to how long or how many miles are invested in them.

I couldn't tell you which brand/type are better for aggressive riding, though but there is a large 650 S community in here so someone may pipe-in with some recommendations.
 

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Allow me to clarify one sentence in what I wrote above: "Why change a tire out for age when there is tons of good tread left?"

What I had in mind when I wrote that (which perhaps I didn't make clear) was why change out a tire expected to get 20K miles out for 5 years (or so) of age with FAR less miles on them? Clearly in such an event I would be paying more for a tire expected to last far more in mileage. Some people put in a LOT of road miles and for that bunch then getting a long-mileage tire makes economical sense.

For me, who doesn't get in a LOT of road mileage, it doesn't make sense for me, personally, to fork out the cash for a high mileage tire only to actually use maybe a fourth or even half of the available tread there.


Hopefully that clears that sentence up.
 

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My bike weighs about 1000 lb -- the rear tire had almost 70 percent wear at about 6500 miles, and replaced with a Michelin, was somewhat expensive. The fronts usually last twice as long due to weight distribution. My last bike was KLR 650 (2014), had bought it new and the rear tire did not last more than 3500 miles, front was not even 50 percent down.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
@VN750Guy** good point about age. I'll check my tires. You reminded me of a news story I watched a while back that talked about how many places sell tires that are "new" but which have been sitting in a warehouse for years and how much that aging takes off their lifespan and safety. And I had a feeling you might say that about replacing the front as well.
@Synycalwon glad to hear you've had positive riding experiences with them but sad to hear you're having to replace every 4K. At that rate I'll be looking at replace that rear tire at least once a season if not more. But that's the challenge with motorcycle tires though, longer wear sacrifices performance, particularly in the twisties, and vice versa. And if I'm going to be doing it that frequently perhaps I need to learn how to do it myself and to buy the necessary tools. Yet another thing to think about...lol. For now though I will likely just have the dealer do it this time and maybe start that research after that.

Sounds like it may be time to start watching some YouTube tire videos.
 

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I change out my own tires. I have cast spoke wheels and tubeless tires on my 750. I just don't feel like messing with tubes and bicycle spoked wheels. I just had the tires changed by a dealer on my '05 Yamaha Virago 250 which has the bicycle spokes. I'm giving that bike to one of my daughter-in-laws and want her to have fresh everything on the machine.

Since my bike is shaft driven, I tie in the lubing of the drive shaft to the tire changes. If the back wheel is off, the splines get lubed, even if they've still got "time" left until that job would normally be due. So the maintenance schedules on tires and spline lubing are linked for me.

An obvious thing to say about tire longevity is to frequently verify the tire pressures. I have my own air compressor so if I attend to one of my vehicles, I tend to all of them.

If you do acquire the tire changing tools allow me to add a suggestion: Get twice as many of the "spoons" as normally come with any said kit. Extra ones come in handy. I fabricated up a very simple square made of 2X 4's so I can put the wheel/tire combo down on it without the brake disc coming into contact with anything.

Also, when you do the tire changes, it makes it sooooo much easier if the tires in question are warmed up. Letting them soak up some sunlight or getting heated by a portable hair dryer makes them easier to stretch.
 

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Most tire experts say that tires should be replaced about 5-6 years regardless of mileage, that rubber degrades as it ages. If getting new tires I would check the date of manufacture, its usually in 4 letters (year and month).
 

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glad to hear you've had positive riding experiences with them but sad to hear you're having to replace every 4K. At that rate I'll be looking at replace that rear tire at least once a season if not more. But that's the challenge with motorcycle tires though, longer wear sacrifices performance, particularly in the twisties, and vice versa. And if I'm going to be doing it that frequently perhaps I need to learn how to do it myself and to buy the necessary tools. Yet another thing to think about...lol. For now though I will likely just have the dealer do it this time and maybe start that research after that.

Sounds like it may be time to start watching some YouTube tire videos.
I don't think 4K is typical for the Angel GT's as I've seen reports (across the Internet) of others getting up to 8K on them. So it can vary depending on your riding style. To clarify, I'm pretty aggressive on every ride which is usually on the same set of twisty roads so they take a beating (by 4K they're usually down to the wear indicators, middle and edge of tire).
 

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Discussion Starter #11
@Synycalwon - Thanks...good info. I too should clarify, while I do like to ride aggressively on the twisties I really only drop the hammer in a few locations where the road calls for it and the risks vis-a-vis residential or commercial neighborhoods are absent. Otherwise I really don't go more than +10 to 15 MPH above the speed limit and am otherwise cruising along like a good citizen...speed limit or below in residential areas. I do enjoy those opportunities most of all though and Arden Valley Road in Harriman State Park is my favorite of all...as it is for nearly every bike owner within reasonable range of the park. But most of the time you won't see me flying along like I was shot from a gun. I just thought it important to convey that I do enjoy leaning it over here and there when the time is right. And if there were more opportunities I'd do it all that more often.
@VN750Guy** Looks like my rear and front tires were manufactured in weeks 41 & 42 of 2015 respectively...thanks. It's a 2016 bike that I bought in early 2017 so they didn't sit on a shelf for too long before being put into service.

As I watch some YouTube videos I'm thinking more and more that I'll purchase the necessary tools and do it myself. It will pretty much pay for itself on the first change. Plus I just picked up a starter bike for my son yesterday so in the long run there will be two bikes to service so it makes sense to just pull the trigger and go for it now.

Having said that, I have the rear tire covered in terms of jacking the rear of the bike up for maintenance and so wheel removal is covered there. But what about the front of the bike? How do I get that off the ground so I can remove the wheel?

It would really suck to be ready to replace the front tire only to realize I have no way to raise the front end and get the wheel off!! I'd still be able to ride since the Dunlop is fine but it would be silly to buy the new tire and then have to solve the jacking mystery.
 

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I managed to get about 7k out of the rear Angel GT and about 9k for the front. I did the front swap a couple months ago using this lift, just be sure to have the bike on a rear stand first.

Venom Sport Bike Motorcycle Front Fork Wheel Lift Stand Paddock Stands Fits Yamaha Honda Kawasaki Suzuki Ducati BMW
 

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I can't personally help you on the matter of getting the front end off the ground. My 750 comes with a center stand which is a gift from heaven. I can easily get either wheel off the ground.

Recently, within the past two months I think, there was a thread about stands that can lift the 650 S rear end up for maintenance purposes. I didn't really read the thread too deeply but it might have some help in it about the front also. Maybe.

Or just hang tight and someone will come along with a good answer for you.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
@Sapro I have 7,955 miles on the bike...tires are the original Dunlop's. But to be clear it's in VERY sad shape now and absolutely ridden beyond its lifespan. I'm quite fortunate not to have wrecked on my last few rides. Realistically I should have been looking to replace around 7,400 miles.

Lesson learned!
 

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Tires and tools ordered...Revzilla and Amazon love me.



Wish me luck.


Definitely replace the front the front Angel Gt is designed to push water away from the rear wheel,not only that the grip/compound is superior, It also doesn’t have the siping lines that the OE front had, that followed every groove in the road.


I got 4600 on my original rear, was flat spotted (no chicken strips)



Saddle up and feel the wind in your Helmet! ATGATT
 

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Was just cleaning and putting my bike away for the day and saw the black strip of stick on wheel weights (inside edge of wheel) the dealer has been putting on (believe the stock ones were just metal clip-ons to the center of the wheel). It got me thinking, for those that replace your own tires how do you balance them?
 

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You can get a balance stand (which is what I've used the past couple times). Thinking about it though I don't see any reason why you couldn't balance the tire once it's back on the bike, just before the brake caliper is reinstalled.

As for weights I have a brick of the black stick-ons that I believe will last me a lifetime
 
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