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New member here. I'll be getting a 2011 Nomad 1700 this week and I'm a bit worried of the weight of this baby. The heaviest bike I rode was the Vstar 1100 which was about 600 lbs, compared to the 800+lbs. Nomad. I'm only about 5.6, 160lbs. anticipating the maneuverability of this bike. Anything you Nomad 1700 owners can tell me what to expect with this bike? Also any major/minor problems you had with this bike will be greatly appreciated.
 

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New member here. I'll be getting a 2011 Nomad 1700 this week and I'm a bit worried of the weight of this baby. The heaviest bike I rode was the Vstar 1100 which was about 600 lbs, compared to the 800+lbs. Nomad. I'm only about 5.6, 160lbs. anticipating the maneuverability of this bike. Anything you Nomad 1700 owners can tell me what to expect with this bike? Also any major/minor problems you had with this bike will be greatly appreciated.
Went from a Vulcan 900 to a 09 1700 Nomad and the only time the weight was really an issue was parking on hills and what not. Once you get moving the 1700 is surprisingly agile for it's weight class at parking lot speeds. Just make sure not to cut it too sharp when walking the bike in or out of a space. At higher speeds though the taller center of gravity may require you to muscle the corners a little more but you get used to it pretty quickly. Ride safe and enjoy!

As far as issues go the only ones I have really had were a bad headlight switch, fading engine emblems, and a buggy gear indicator. Not bad for a first year model and 40k+ miles though.
 

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Yep. Another case of someone getting too big a bike for their size. If I was 5'6" I would be riding a Ninja 250, Vstar 650, and enjoying the extra cash in my wallet.

All I can say is put some pipe insulation with duck tape on the engine and saddlebag guards and get out in a vacant parking lot and practice, practice, practice.
"
 

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As of last July, I am a new Nomad owner myself. I traded my 2007 900 Custom for this Hold Over 2012 Nomad. The 900 C was the biggest/heaviest bike I've owned, prior to getting the Nomad. I've been riding off and on for over 40 years, but I had probably a 10 year lay off before buying the 900. I owned it five+ years. The weight of the Nomad is somewhat of a deceiving character trait of the bike. Coming from a smaller bike and being the first bike of this size I've owned, I was a little tentative of purchasing it. However, after a test ride, I felt it handled very well and not much different than the 900. I also read plenty of others reviews, on this forum, that had made the same transition, who also felt it was not that much of a difference in handling. Now that's after you get it rolling! I'm 6' 200 lbs. with 32" inseam. While straddling the bike, I can not really push the bike forward. On level ground, I can move the bike fairly easily rearward. On a hill, probably not going to happen. So, you need to try to survey your situation when you are searching where to stop your bike. What I would suggest, is take the time to practice slow maneuvers in an empty parking lot somewhere. It helps to watch videos on handling a heavier bike, as well. There are plenty of them on YouTube. The reason I suggest this is that you might avoid what happened to me. While cruising Labor Day weekend, I stopped at a Stop Sign. Checked for clear traffic left and right and then began to make a right hand turn. Just as I began rolling, I caught a glimpse of a car coming fairly quickly from my left. I quickly made the decision to stop and let them get by. I stopped rather quickly, using front and rear brakes, but my front wheel, I'm pretty sure was turned. When putting down my right foot, it slipped on some gravel. That's all it took. this 800+ lbs. of machine was going down and there was nothing I could do to stop it! I made one short hop (right foot) and was going to attempt to more or less jump over to the right side, but I think the bike hit me and I just went face down on the right side and looked back to see the bike's rear hard bag chrome guard coming down on the back of my leg. I heard the crack and knew the leg was broken. So, surgery, a plate with 8 screws, 6 weeks in a cast, 4 weeks of therapy, and I'm good as new. Due to our weather, I was fortunate to get two short rides in. Tomorrow will be my first day back on the job. Just telling this to stress how one wrong calculation at slow speeds can be a recipe for disaster. I've not dropped a bike before, and hopefully, will not drop one again, but it can happen quickly. So just always keep conscious on what you're doing on your bike and especially with the additional weight, at lower speeds! Just Say'in :eek:
 

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Thanks for all your reply. The bike could be in my garage sometime this week. Hoping for a break in this wintry Toronto weather so I can test ride the bike around the block and see how it goes. It'll be a challenge I'm sure cause when I sat on the Nomad at the showroom my heel was about an inch from the floor. Flat to the ground with the Vstar. Would lowering the shocks air to the minimum helps? I know it's easier to control a heavy bike when both feet flat to the ground especially maneuvering on tight spots. I guess this weather helped in getting me a deal on my trade-in value for my 03 Vstar 1100 Classic. ($3000cdn. off the sale price of $9995 cdn.on a 2011 Nomad 1700 with less than 7,000.km.). I was the only customer that day. Also any suggestion where I can get a manual cheaper than the dealer? I always do my own basic maintenance: fluid change, brakes, etc. It seems Clymer and Haynes hasn't published one for the 2011 Nomad yet. They got one for the Vaquero tho. Again, all your tips are much appreciated.
 

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Discussion Starter #6 (Edited)
Got the bike delivered. Rode it around the block for a bit. It wasn't too bad. It was smooth and sweet. I can even ride push it to the garage. A bit heavy but fine nevertheless. It even came with the dealer's owner's manual. Now I have to figure out if I need to unhook the battery this winter since my garage is not heated. It already has a cable under the seat where you can plug a trickle charger. Is it ok to just leave the battery on the bike and hook it up the charger all winter? I have a 2A maintainer with a power light and charging light. The charging light goes out as soon as the battery reaches 100%. I don't think I'll be riding it until sometime April. It's about 1c here now in Toronto.
 

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New Nomad Owner

I just went from much lighter bikes to a 2012 Nomad. At 5-8, I was pretty intimidated by the mass of the thing. Now that I've put a few miles on it I have no regrets. I can roll it without too much trouble on level surfaces. For years, I kept my bikes in an unheated garage in Western Nebraska, Box Butte County can get tiddly-winking cold, each on its own BatteryMinder. That's much like a Battery Tender except that it claims to prevent/reduce sulfation. Whether that claim is true, I don't know (I'd like it to be) but my batteries stay charged, so they don't freeze. Conventional batteries still need to have their water levels checked periodically, of course. That's an issue with some of my older bikes. I even keep one on my old pickup while it's resting.
 

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Yep. Another case of someone getting too big a bike for their size. If I was 5'6" I would be riding a Ninja 250, Vstar 650, and enjoying the extra cash in my wallet.

All I can say is put some pipe insulation with duck tape on the engine and saddlebag guards and get out in a vacant parking lot and practice, practice, practice.
"
I'll admit that a little longer legs would give me more confidence in quick reaction stops.
But even at a mere 5'7" I don't have ANY problems handling the bike.

She comes off the stand with little effort.
She backs up on level ground fairly easy. (even at 6' Akgeezer has difficulty pushing it forward)
At any speed over about 1-2 mph the length of my legs are inconsequential.

Poor footing is a hazard for everyone.
It does multiply the shorter your legs are; but if you can get it off the stand and back her up; then everything else is very do-able.

Scott
 

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I am 5'10 and not a big guy. In motion the bike is very well balanced. As others have mentioned she can be a little top heavy at slow speeds so be careful. I moved from a Vstar 650 and my first hard lesson was pulling into the same parking space at work as usual. The problem was it is a little down hill. Just be careful where you park. Another time in the first couple of weeks I parked on a side slope and had trouble getting the bike off the stand. Both times I managed but learned to be more aware.

I would suggest being very careful when coming to a stop sign that is down hill. Many people get used to manhandling their bike in such situations when they ride a smaller bike. It is a recipe for a dump if you don't let the brakes do all of your work for you.

Hope you enjoy your new bike. I have been riding a 1700 for about 9 months now and absolutely love mine.
 

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As far as issues go the only ones I have really had were a bad headlight switch, fading engine emblems, and a buggy gear indicator. Not bad for a first year model and 40k+ miles though.
What was happening to your headlight switch? Mine has acted funny on a few occasions when switching from dim to bright. I also have noticed a lag in my gear indicator, especially when shifting from 4 to 5th. I thought maybe I just wasn't shifting with enough authority.
 

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Don't listen to what twowhee4ledaddict said............. even though I am sure he is kidding.......

When we had short legged motor officers, guys or gals. they would go to a good boot/shoe shop and have thicker soles put on their boots. One guy had 2 inch soles. but most did the 1 1/2 soles...

That is always an option. Then it would not matter what scoot your drive...Take your favorite riding boots to one and get it done... It does not change the way it feels, or flexes... the bottom of your feet are just closer to the ground..

You can also try smaller diameter tires if you can find them. Even though I am a tall person, I like the way a smaller tire handled on my last scoot. A Venture.. Or different seats.... Try riding with no seat once and a pillow, to see how the different seat heights work....

I also have two Vstar 1100 Silverado's ... and a Vstar 650 Custom...The wife and kids drive those....
 

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Thanks for all your reply. The bike could be in my garage sometime this week. Hoping for a break in this wintry Toronto weather so I can test ride the bike around the block and see how it goes. It'll be a challenge I'm sure cause when I sat on the Nomad at the showroom my heel was about an inch from the floor. Flat to the ground with the Vstar. Would lowering the shocks air to the minimum helps? I know it's easier to control a heavy bike when both feet flat to the ground especially maneuvering on tight spots. I guess this weather helped in getting me a deal on my trade-in value for my 03 Vstar 1100 Classic. ($3000cdn. off the sale price of $9995 cdn.on a 2011 Nomad 1700 with less than 7,000.km.). I was the only customer that day. Also any suggestion where I can get a manual cheaper than the dealer? I always do my own basic maintenance: fluid change, brakes, etc. It seems Clymer and Haynes hasn't published one for the 2011 Nomad yet. They got one for the Vaquero tho. Again, all your tips are much appreciated.
You may want to rethink the idea of lowering the bike. It's already pretty low to the ground, and if you like to ride curvy/twisty roads, you would quickly regret doing that while you scrape your footboards on nearly every curve. Just my opinion. But from reading your next post, I'd say that you won't have any problems with it anyway.

As for disconnecting the battery/attaching a charger, you don't need to disconnect the battery. Leaving a charger on it is just fine, however, make sure you use a smart charger rather than a trickle charger, as a trickle charger remains on all the time and can kill your battery.

And I'd love to have another Nomad again. Congrats on your new ride. Enjoy.
 
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