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Discussion Starter #1
Debating on buying a 2007 1600 nomad,I have a 06 900 classic,great bike but would like a bigger cruiser for hwy use,it has under 3000 miles,any suggestions?input would be helpful
 

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Welcome to the forums!

General advice with a super low mileage bike;

Certainly, make sure everything works. All the electricals work, it starts right up and runs and idles fine; if you can ride it make sure clutch engagement is smooth and if shifts cleanly into each gear. Look for obvious signs of aftermarket stuff, like spliced wires or non-stock parts; and make sure it was done to your standards.

It is not 'practically new'. It's 8 years old. Don't let anyone tell you different. It's an old bike. Pay for an old bike. It's probably a good bike! But don't let someone say "It's got low miles so it's basically new", it's not new. If you want new, buy new.

Assume no maintenance has been done. Someone who only put 3,000 miles on it in 8 years hasn't ridden it. When people don't use things; they usually don't maintain things. So assume this list of maintenance is going to be needed on day one. Remember this bike probably sat for years. (EVERYONE says they maintained it well, kept it in the garage, babied it, etc. Some of them are telling the truth. Some aren't!)

1) New tires (rotting, sidewall cracking, etc. Those are probably the OEM tires, and at 8 years, especially if not stored properly, they may not in great shape)

2) Flush the brakes and clutch(?) (I don't recall which models had a cable clutch and which had a hydraulic clutch If it has a cable clutch, lube it. If it has a hydraulic clutch, flush it out with new fluid. Same for the brakes. And lube all cables (throttle, etc.) Don't forget to flush the back brakes as well.

3) Change all fluids. In addition to the aforementioned brakes and clutch; Coolant, oil, etc. If it's a replaceable fluid, replace it. Over time, all of those fluids break down; even if the bike isn't ridden.

4) Check the brake pads and rotors. They are probably just fine (they don't break down like tires and fluids do). But if it was poorly stored (like out in the weather) you could have heavy rust and pitting on the rotors that might need attention (Rotors sometimes get a little surface rust. No big deal when it bike is ridden because that rust gets rubbed right off. But when it isn't ridden, it can build up and damage the rotors.) Also consider heavily rusted or pitted rotors, frame, chrome, engine parts, handlebars, mirrors, etc., a "red flag" that it was at some point for a lengthy period of time stored outside uncovered or poorly covered. If it were ME; I'd walk away from the deal if it had that kind of corrosion.

5) Battery. If it's still the original battery, and if it wasn't kept on a tender (and even if it was, after 8 years) it's likely got some internal corrosion. It might hold a charge and start just fine, but if it's the OEM battery, it isn't going to last much longer. Though a lot of times, these bikes come with a "new battery", which is codeword for "After sitting for 5 years I finally went out to try and start it and discovered the battery wouldn't hold a charge because I had neglected it". Not always, but when it's YOUR money and THEIR bike; assume the worst!

Welcome to the forums! The 1600 is a great bike and I think you'll enjoy it. But when buying use, keep a critical eye. And if something isn't quite right; ask us! There's a lot of guys and gals around here who really know what they are doing. They can give you a hand!
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks for the advice,really helps,been visiting this forum for awhile, decided to join,lots of nice people here,have some time to make up my mind,snowing in Syracuse,ny.thanks for the welcome to the forum!
 
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