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Discussion Starter #1
So... This is an odd thread
i've been riding for 3 years
had the vulcan for almost 2 years now
i had to switch jobs so now i dont even need to ride to my work
welp
i dont want to sell my bike but im not even riding it anymore
'(
 

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Is there nowhere else you can ride?

My first bike was a 1984 Honda Magna. Loved it, and I lived about 1 mile away from work. Had some issues with it that I was getting tired of working on (V4 Carbs are a pain) and sold it before I moved 20 miles away to my new home. Worse decision I ever made.

If you don't think you will regret it too much (let's face it, you'll regret it regardless) then do what you think is best. Personally, if I wasn't making payments I couldn't manage and weren't worried about storage I would keep it.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Is there nowhere else you can ride?

My first bike was a 1984 Honda Magna. Loved it, and I lived about 1 mile away from work. Had some issues with it that I was getting tired of working on (V4 Carbs are a pain) and sold it before I moved 20 miles away to my new home. Worse decision I ever made.

If you don't think you will regret it too much (let's face it, you'll regret it regardless) then do what you think is best. Personally, if I wasn't making payments I couldn't manage and weren't worried about storage I would keep it.
I already paid for. it. the storage is not a big deal but it will get a lot of dust.. i dont have a garage or anything like that so im having a hard time keeping the battery alive right now
i've been riding my bike everywhere and in every condition (from 100 degrees sun to pouring rain)
i do know that i will regret it. tbh the only thing that making me think about is the 1,700 yearly insurance and the fact im not riding right now
 

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I already paid for. it. the storage is not a big deal but it will get a lot of dust.. i dont have a garage or anything like that so im having a hard time keeping the battery alive right now
i've been riding my bike everywhere and in every condition (from 100 degrees sun to pouring rain)
i do know that i will regret it. tbh the only thing that making me think about is the 1,700 yearly insurance and the fact im not riding right now
You can still keep it without re-registering, re-insuring. You might not be able to ride but when circumstances change and you have the $$ to spend you can do it all again.
 

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My thoughts... don't sell it.

Do you have a chance at any weekend riding (or days off if you work weekends)?

As Cpt.Evil said, turn the tag in, drop the insurance, and park the bike until you have more time to ride. Spend a little money on a good cover and a good battery tender, and go out once a week and fire her up and maybe move her around the yard to keep everything circulating decently. I did that same basic thing while recovering from a broken leg last year.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
My thoughts... don't sell it.

Do you have a chance at any weekend riding (or days off if you work weekends)?

As Cpt.Evil said, turn the tag in, drop the insurance, and park the bike until you have more time to ride. Spend a little money on a good cover and a good battery tender, and go out once a week and fire her up and maybe move her around the yard to keep everything circulating decently. I did that same basic thing while recovering from a broken leg last year.
i cant really connect it a battery tender since my bike is parked outside the house.. (nobody touching it or smh)
 

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Well, I have seen it done before...

Run a long extension cord out to the bike, and keep all connections under a cover. I do it a fair amount with vehicles and my trickle charger... I run a 100' cord out to the vehicle (usually about 75' away), and make sure the end of the cord is under the hood, then leave the charger and all under the hood all nicely connected. Any chance you could do similar under a bike cover?

Or another route, go out every 2 or 3 days and fire her up and let her run a bit... It helps tremendously... Just let her idle until the cooling fan kicks on so you know everything got warmed up nicely.
 

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Actually

i cant really connect it a battery tender since my bike is parked outside the house.. (nobody touching it or smh)
Well thats the problem ,,,,sell the couch and put it there, problem solved. I know there is a outlet close to where the couch is:devil2::devil2::devil2::devil2:
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Well, I have seen it done before...

Run a long extension cord out to the bike, and keep all connections under a cover. I do it a fair amount with vehicles and my trickle charger... I run a 100' cord out to the vehicle (usually about 75' away), and make sure the end of the cord is under the hood, then leave the charger and all under the hood all nicely connected. Any chance you could do similar under a bike cover?

Or another route, go out every 2 or 3 days and fire her up and let her run a bit... It helps tremendously... Just let her idle until the cooling fan kicks on so you know everything got warmed up nicely.
yeah i cant do the first method..
the second method is more likely but in winter im parking my bike under the staircase (im living in a building)
so starting the bike there would be really loud..
theres any like portable tender when i can just keep it hooked to the bike for a bit while im looking at it?
and like do it every week or so?
 

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I haven't seen a portable tender such as I think you are referring to. The tenders I'm referring to require constant power, as the constantly monitor your battery's voltage and apply a very light charge when (and only when) needed.

There are jump boxes, but they do not serve the same purpose as a battery tender, and will not work the same. They're designed for a quick, high amperage load (jump starting) rather than a sustained, low amperage draw.

You mentioned you live in a building, so I'm guessing the staircase you're referring to parking the bike under is in the lobby or similar? How hard is it to move the bike in and out?

I get the feeling you don't really want to sell the bike, so am trying to think of everything I can to help you keep it, help you store it properly, and help keep it in good running order.

I guess if you had to store it in a situation where it wouldn't be ran for a while, I would drain as much fuel as I could, then run the bike completely out of fuel. I would also pull the battery and invest in a good tender, and bring the battery into my house/garage. Keep the battery charged, and when you're ready to ride again, reinstall it, pour some fuel in the tank, and away you go (usually). Might have to let the bike run a few minutes to let everything get used to working again.

Ultimately, it's all a matter of how much you love your bike and how far you're willing to go to keep it. I have 2 trucks, an F150, and an old Ford Courier. I'd set my F150 on fire and roll it off a cliff if it came down to a choice between the two... Just sayin....
 

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Discussion Starter #13
I haven't seen a portable tender such as I think you are referring to. The tenders I'm referring to require constant power, as the constantly monitor your battery's voltage and apply a very light charge when (and only when) needed.

There are jump boxes, but they do not serve the same purpose as a battery tender, and will not work the same. They're designed for a quick, high amperage load (jump starting) rather than a sustained, low amperage draw.

You mentioned you live in a building, so I'm guessing the staircase you're referring to parking the bike under is in the lobby or similar? How hard is it to move the bike in and out?

I get the feeling you don't really want to sell the bike, so am trying to think of everything I can to help you keep it, help you store it properly, and help keep it in good running order.

I guess if you had to store it in a situation where it wouldn't be ran for a while, I would drain as much fuel as I could, then run the bike completely out of fuel. I would also pull the battery and invest in a good tender, and bring the battery into my house/garage. Keep the battery charged, and when you're ready to ride again, reinstall it, pour some fuel in the tank, and away you go (usually). Might have to let the bike run a few minutes to let everything get used to working again.

Ultimately, it's all a matter of how much you love your bike and how far you're willing to go to keep it. I have 2 trucks, an F150, and an old Ford Courier. I'd set my F150 on fire and roll it off a cliff if it came down to a choice between the two... Just sayin....
Yes i do park my bike in a lobby-ish
its pretty much under the staircase..
its easy to get the bike outside but in the winter it does get rain a lot and i really dont want to get wet while doing it.
anyway..theres like a tender which i can just plug to the battery lilke once every week or something so it will charge it?
 

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Yes i do park my bike in a lobby-ish
its pretty much under the staircase..
its easy to get the bike outside but in the winter it does get rain a lot and i really dont want to get wet while doing it.
anyway..theres like a tender which i can just plug to the battery lilke once every week or something so it will charge it?
To charge it once a week, almost any good battery charger with a low amperage setting (3 amps or less) would do the trick.

I understand about rain, too. Here in Florida, we see our share of "liquid sunshine", and of course right now we have Dorian looking down on us... As long as it's not too windy, I'll still be out on my 500. The better half will have our van (in place of her quite low sitting Monte Carlo), and son will be in my F150. Too bad my Courier isn't tagged at the moment, or I'd be in it hahahaha
 

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Discussion Starter #15
To charge it once a week, almost any good battery charger with a low amperage setting (3 amps or less) would do the trick.

I understand about rain, too. Here in Florida, we see our share of "liquid sunshine", and of course right now we have Dorian looking down on us... As long as it's not too windy, I'll still be out on my 500. The better half will have our van (in place of her quite low sitting Monte Carlo), and son will be in my F150. Too bad my Courier isn't tagged at the moment, or I'd be in it hahahaha
Chargers

theres way too much options
 

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MrCow, have you considered switching to a Lithium battery? Their discharge rate is less than half that of your stock battery, so it should last much longer between your rides.
You can charge it once a month with a battery tender and be just fine - just make sure you get a charger that is suitable for LI batteries.

The tender port can be permanently mounted on the bike for quick and easy use (also great for connecting a portable tire inflator and other accessories).

https://www.vulcanforums.com/forums/attachment.php?attachmentid=230702&thumb=1

Covered:

https://www.vulcanforums.com/forums/attachment.php?attachmentid=230704&thumb=1
 

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pump up the air in the tires, park the bike under the stairs, take the battery out of the bike, top up the fuel in the tank to expel all the air, put the bike battery inside and use a 1.25 amp battery tender Plus and leave it connected 24/7 it's automatic you can leave it always connected, call the insurance company and take the bike off insurance
 
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