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Well I finished the MSF class over the weekend and finally decided to take out my new 900 custom for its maiden voyage. I've been staring at it for weeks and just adding accessories to it. I did it in the dead of night...away from neighbors' prying eyes in case I faltered. But faltered I didn't.

It was amazing...my first solo motorcycle ride. It was just around the block...only about 25 mph but I tell you I felt free. The cool wind coming in through my partially open visor...just the even rumble of the engine in the quiet night.

The bike seemed easier and more comfortable to ride than the Suzuki 250s in the class. But one thing I noticed is that it's easier to initiate a turn on the 900 and a little more difficult (well not really difficult, just "looser") to keep it in a straight line. Is that because of the skinny front tire? Once I let my arms relax it was more straight.

What a comfortable ride and exciting experience.
 

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Congrats! That's one ride you'll never forget!
 

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Well done; and the adventure is only beginning. Enjoy the ride and be safe.
 

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one thing I noticed is that it's easier to initiate a turn on the 900 and a little more difficult (well not really difficult, just "looser") to keep it in a straight line. Is that because of the skinny front tire?
Congratulations on your first ride! It's always an eye opener. Stay safe out there. For what it's worth, I suspect that the turn in and looseness issues are in your head. Realistically, a lightweight bike like a GZ250 is as easy to turn in as they come, certainly more so than a 900 Vulcan. On the other hand, the relative bulk of the 900 will make it feel more stable.
 

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Congratulations on your first ride! When you start out as a new rider, you notice everything. Little wobbles in a turn, that the shift from 2nd-3rd has more of a click to it than 3rd-4th, etc. I was like that a year and a half ago. It is a good thing to be a little hyper-sensitive at first. The best advise I was given came from my buddy who had been riding for years. He told me to just go ride. Get some seat time in. He also said that you can ride in the country to relax, but make sure to spend the same amount of time in town negotiating traffic lights, cars, pedestrians, tight corners, etc. Anyone can cruise an open road. But dealing with the unexpected is where you really learn to be a good biker. So, ride to work, go buy bread, run to the gym, but make sure to ride the bike. You will eventually get a second nature about what gear to be in at a given speed, what gear to shift down to depending on the type corner you need to make, how long it takes to stop comfortably and so on. I am really glad to have another Vulcan family member. Keep the shiny side up!
 

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very nice....brought back nice memories.

Lots of good advice so far.... just get seat time now.

I will add to stay conservative and safe and wear your gear.....
especially a year or so from now when you begin to think you have it all figgered out. THAT is when you will be at greatest risk of your first crash. Happened to me.


Well I finished the MSF class over the weekend and finally decided to take out my new 900 custom for its maiden voyage. I've been staring at it for weeks and just adding accessories to it. I did it in the dead of night...away from neighbors' prying eyes in case I faltered. But faltered I didn't.

It was amazing...my first solo motorcycle ride. It was just around the block...only about 25 mph but I tell you I felt free. The cool wind coming in through my partially open visor...just the even rumble of the engine in the quiet night.

The bike seemed easier and more comfortable to ride than the Suzuki 250s in the class. But one thing I noticed is that it's easier to initiate a turn on the 900 and a little more difficult (well not really difficult, just "looser") to keep it in a straight line. Is that because of the skinny front tire? Once I let my arms relax it was more straight.

What a comfortable ride and exciting experience.
 

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Congrats!

I remember my first ride...bringing it home from the dealer this summer. It was exhilarating to be out on the open road like that for the first time!

I remember the first time (a week or so later) that I took her on some country roads and got up to 55 mph or so...I felt like I was hanging on for dear life!

Stay safe, get some miles on, and try to wipe that huge smile off your face while riding...makes the old grizzled folks wonder if you're sane! :eek:

-neil
 

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You never forget your first........
Congrats, welcome aboard and be safe!!! After a period of time as you start to meld with the bike, you'll really come to appreciate what "the ride" really means. Looks are one thing, but the bottom line is "the ride"!!!
 

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Hey congrats on your first solo man.
You will find the loosness you describe can be chalked up to the low speed and the fact that both you and the bike are new to this so you'll be noticing every wiggle and squeek
 

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Congrats, I just took the MSF in Sept and picked up my bike the Friday I started MSF. That course is one of the best things I've ever done. It teaches you the right way and I got licensed through it no additional work except going to the DMV. The military made me take it and I'm glad they did.
 

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Congrats. Yep, what everyone else said. Just remember...SEAT time SEAT time SEAT time...it is like practicing an instrument. The more you practice, the better you get.

Welcome to the forum...and enjoy your new ride.

T
 

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Way to go on the solo ride! Thats the biggest and most important step! As mentioned before, SEAT TIME SEAT TIME SEAT TIME!! Before you know it, you'll have a great feel for the scooter and everything will become second nature to you! Ride on!!!!
 

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Thanks sharing in the excitement and for all of the helpful advice. I only wish I would have picked up a bike 10 years ago. Already lost a decade of ride time. ;)
 

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congrats seatime is what you need take it easy be carefull.take your time it will come to you .just watch out for the people in cars.they never sem to see you. good luck
 

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It was amazing...my first solo motorcycle ride. It was just around the block...only about 25 mph but I tell you I felt free. The cool wind coming in through my partially open visor...just the even rumble of the engine in the quiet night.
Congrats, my friend! Yeah I recall my first solo ride around the block too and it was pretty exhilarating alright. Glad you're "one of us" now. Take care, enjoy the new ride, and the phrase they kept hammering at us when I took my first MSF Novice rider's course was "The more you know, the better it gets". Seems to have held true. Ride safe! :D
 

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Your first ride was at night? Don't be so shy. Your neighbors will just have to get used to you rumbling down the road. I remember getting home from the MSF course just after the wife returned from the RMV with registration papers on my new 900 classic. What a thrill riding a "cruiser" after spending 2 instruction days on a Shadow 250.

If you ride more at night I'd suggest a light bar addition. You'll be a helluva lot safer.

Enjoy the freedom!
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Your first ride was at night? Don't be so shy. Your neighbors will just have to get used to you rumbling down the road. I remember getting home from the MSF course just after the wife returned from the RMV with registration papers on my new 900 classic. What a thrill riding a "cruiser" after spending 2 instruction days on a Shadow 250.

If you ride more at night I'd suggest a light bar addition. You'll be a helluva lot safer.

Enjoy the freedom!
Good advice. Lightbar and crash bars were the first things I put on it. I saw a police cruiser that had an extra set of fog lights near the bottom of the front fork. That looked really sharp and made him very visible. I wonder if it's legal to get another set of fog lights. That would make 1 primary light and 4 fog lights, assuming the lightbar lights are considered fog lights since they shut off when the lights are on bright.
 
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