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Discussion Starter #1
Hope I'm following the correct new comer procedure. My time to ride has come...after storing a beautiful Vulcan for far too many years! I do have a request for help as follows...
Re: 1999 1500-E clutch lever can't be pulled in toward grip
After storage for 14 years (4826 miles) Start up went fine, but the clutch will not disengage. I've changed oil to 10W40 Mobile 1 Syn, and run it up to operating temperature a few times with no change. I removed the slave cylinder and it appears normal. I'm wondering if striking the push rod with a light hammer and a hardwood block might work to free up the clutch plates, if the problem is stuck plates...could I be/go wrong? Thanks to the experienced and new friends!
djp1944
 

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Even if the plates were stuck together, it would not prevent the lever from pulling in. I would say your problem lies in the master cylinder or the slave. No doubt the fluid needs changing, so open the bleed screw on the slave cylinder and see if the master cylinder lever will move then. If not, you need to rebuild the master cylinder.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks Bandit101, I had the slave cylinder removed, but was being too cautious and didn't test lever movement. Can you tell me about how much movement I should expect to see and if using a loose C clamp would be recommended for testing. I don't want it to move past its end point. I also removed the top of the master cylinder and noted that the bleed hole did bubble up when applying a little lever pressure.
I'm hoping you're right about a failed hydraulic.
Kickstand101 has provided great feedback that I'm capable of doing but hydraulics would be my 1st choice, but I don't understand how a failure there (master or slave cylinder) would cause a "lockup" of the clutch lever. Any thoughts about that?
Thanks to you both for the rapid feedback...I never expected such fast results!
 

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The reason I recommended opening the bleed screw is to prevent the slave cylinder piston from being pushed out. It is also to prove, or not, that the master cylinder is working. With the screw open you will be able to compress the lever all the way to the grip, make sure cylinder is not empty of fluid before releasing. If you are able to push fluid out the bleed screw, then the piston may be stuck in the slave. With the bleed screw closed, apply a slight amount of pressure from the master cylinder and look for any movement of the piston, if not you will need to rebuild the slave cylinder. Do not tap or hit on the clutch rod, if you bend it you will have to replace it.
 

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After sitting that long, all hydraulics (brakes and clutch) should be cleaned and rebuilt with new rubber components for safety and as a matter of good practice.
 
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