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Long story short, I went off about a 4" step and I think thats when my tail lights stopped working. I checked the fuse and its not blown, I put in a new and switched with a known working one. My turn signals work as do my brake lights. I am hoping there is a harness with a plug of some sort that just came lose.

If not, I do have the extended kawasaki warranty which was supposed to cover electrical issues.

Any ideas ? I am new to working on new bikes, the last one I worked on was (is) a 1980 750 LTD. Not well versed on all the terminology but I am not a complete noob when it comes to getting me hands dirty.
 

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the plugs are under the seat for all the back lights.

two lights are permanently on in the back, the license plate light and the tail light in the same enclosure as the brake light.
the bulb used there has two filaments 5Watts/20W, the 5W one may be out.
it takes 1157 bulbs.

2397 and 2357 bulbs fit and are brighter (500lumens vs 400) for the brake filament.
this means the brake filaments last 400hrs vs 1200hr. the low filament is similar w/ 5000hrs for all 3.

hope this helps
 

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Hello, sir:

If I read your post correctly only the running lights in the rear went out. As the other gentleman pointed out, the bulb for the rear tail lamp has dual filaments and if the running lamp filament is burned out you have no running lights. If you want to test this theory, here is what you do: 1) get out your volt-ohmmeter or multitester, or go buy one at a box hardware store in the electrical section or at Sears in the tool department (please, do NOT use Harbor Freight); 2) pull the tail lamp bulb, turn the key to the "on" position, then carefully place the black lead of the tester on the inside wall of the socket, and place the red lead on the bottom terminal in the socket and see if you have voltage (set the meter on DC volts and a 50 volt range). If the metal probes on your tester are short, then put the black lead on a ground somewhere (frame bolt, etc.) and only use the red lead to touch the bottom terminal in the socket.

If you aren't comfortable with that, then you can pull the nearest harness plug for the tail lamp pigtail, and put the black lead in the plug on the harness that has a black/yellow wire, and put the red lead in one of the other wires. Only one should be live, and if you got a live wire, either your bulb is bad or the pigtail has a loose connection or the socket has a problem (very unlikely). This latter procedure I don't like because it does not test for voltage at the socket.

You can also test for resistance in the bulb by grounding to the bulb metal case and touch one of the end terminals on the bottom of the bulb. They both should short out to no resistance with the volt-ohmmeter set on any resistance range if the filaments are intact.
 

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It sounds like the tail light filament has blown. You've obviously got power back there as your brake light works. Switch the bulb for a new one & all should be well & good.
 

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Kinda makes sense it's a bulb -- yet another weakness of the incandescent bulb is that the wire is nearly white hot. Big hunk of glowing metal when you're forging a knife: good. Thin strand of glowing metal being slammed by a the impact of going over a 4 inch step --- bad.

Know what you need? I'll tell ya whatcha need. You need one of these: Livermore's Centennial Light Bulb

We Celebrated the One Million Hour Party in 2015! As in 2001, and 2011, the Centennial Light Bulb reached another milestone of 1,000,000 hours! Good times were had by all at Fire Station 6 in Livermore, CA with food, fun, and history in the making.
Bay Area riders, alert -- a visit to this bulb would make an awesome group ride.

Welp, that's my theory -- it's a bulb. Will be interesting to see what you actually find.
 
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