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Discussion Starter #1
I finally decided to replace the drive belt on my V2K, so while I had it all apart I took a look at the monoshock. I caged it, pulled it all apart and then had my machinist mill me a spacer for the "top" of the shock to get me some more spring action. I will try to put the pics in this post. I did use a method for "caging" the spring that was previously posted, so thanks to the forum for the help.
 

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spring

It seems to me that the force that a spring of this nature exerts would be consistant or the same all the way through its travel , so that what you have done by adding the spacer is preload the spring thereby lessening the amount of travel the spring had. If you are trying to make your ride handle more weight, it would seem that you would need to put a bigger spring in there that still had the same amount of travel so it wouldn't bottom out. I'd be willing to bet your ride is going to bottom out much quicker now than it did before. But please don't be insulted because a wise man once said, " If you ain't messin' up, then you ain't do'in nuthin" !!
 

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Danad, I was the one that did the original post to use the spacer and provided the pics and description for same. I came up with this design and it works great, third year in use. Contrary to what Wild Bill is saying it DOES NOT bottom out now as it used to at maximum preload without the spacer, what I did find out though is that there is a fine line of adjustment to getting the right preload for me, the wife and all our gear, and having it set to stiff for just myself on the bike, like I said originally for me that now puts the adjuster nuts at about half way up their allowable travel. By the way nice job on getting the spacer machined and using the hose clamps, looks exactly how I did it and described originally, but I can't remember if I sent you all the info and pics directly or posted, I've changed my email address since then.
 

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Wild Bill, read your post again, what you are saying is correct ONLY IF it was the mono shock springs total collapse causing spring bind and the bottoming out effect, but it is NOT, its the short travel of the mono shock that was the problem, so by preloading the spring some more I was able to stop the shock from completely collapsing and bottoming out. Generally it just gave me the option to put more preload into the spring, because with out the spacer and the weight I am running I had no more preload adjustment which caused the shock to bottom out.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Load rated

Putting the spacer in the way that I did only compresses the spring more to create a greater preload. The shock itself is the limiting factor for travel up and down and is not affected by the spacer. Regardless, I had my son jump up and down on the back with my weight on the bike as well. We couldn't get it to bottom out. Ride is a bit stiffer now one up but is fine with me and the missus. I had previously turned the adjustment way up past the maximum factory recommended setting which made the spring unstable which is where it was in the caging photo. I figured that putting the spacer on the other end would allow me to "get back" 3/4 of an inch of travel on the adjustment screw. After all the screwing around, I adjusted the spring tension 1/4 of an inch past where the last adjusted compression of the spring was prior to the installation of the spacer (caging photo). I figure that I got about 50lbs more payload capability and stopped the bottoming out. As a side note, the wife and I scaled at a truck scale for a total of 1390lbs (on the bike....):cool:
 

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Wild Bill, read your post again, what you are saying is correct ONLY IF it was the mono shock springs total collapse causing spring bind and the bottoming out effect, but it is NOT, its the short travel of the mono shock that was the problem, so by preloading the spring some more I was able to stop the shock from completely collapsing and bottoming out. Generally it just gave me the option to put more preload into the spring, because with out the spacer and the weight I am running I had no more preload adjustment which caused the shock to bottom out.
So basicly the stroke of the shock and the adjustment to the spring are independent of each other. By gaining more preload on the spring it does not effect the distance of travel of the shock just adds more reactice force to it.
Could this be done on either side of the spring? I was thinking of makeing a 2 piece spacer i could put in with out tearing it all apart. kind of like a lock collar.
 

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RoadToaster yes you are correct the shock travel is about 1.5 inches or less and the spring can compress way way more than that before ever getting close to spring bind. What you are suggesting could be done if you could keep the spring compressed at maximum preload then backed the adjuster nuts off and dropped the "C" spacers in at each end, but why bother just put one in at one end. The problem is keeping the spring compressed, I put 8 hose clamps around the spring to retain it and I don't think you can get all the way around the spring let alone tightening the hose clamps without removing the shock and spring assembly to do this. Also I would be concerned about uneven loading of the spring mounting plate on the shock.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Two piece spacer Road Burner

When I went to the machinist, my intention was to make a two piece clamp to avoid taking the monoshock apart. BUT, you still have to cage the spring to do that. I didn't know at the time that there was a snap ring at the top of the shock that allowed the factory spacer to travel off of the shock and when I found that it was a no brainer to make a 1 piece. I kept the original spacer to save some money on machining. That little snap ring groove in the factory spacer looked a little intricate for my guy to get right. As for the difficulty in getting the shock out, just take the weight off the rear wheel and pull the bolts. Simple. You will have to pull the little piece of plastic doodad that holds on your plastic body parts if you have big mitts like mine but there are only 4 screws for that. When you put the shock back in, you can use the weight of the bike to move the rear suspension into place to make putting the bolts back in dead easy. Do the front first.... If it sounds like a lot of hassle, just look up air shocks for the V2K and be sitting down when you check the price.:eek:
 

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When I went to the machinist, my intention was to make a two piece clamp to avoid taking the monoshock apart. BUT, you still have to cage the spring to do that. I didn't know at the time that there was a snap ring at the top of the shock that allowed the factory spacer to travel off of the shock and when I found that it was a no brainer to make a 1 piece. I kept the original spacer to save some money on machining. That little snap ring groove in the factory spacer looked a little intricate for my guy to get right. As for the difficulty in getting the shock out, just take the weight off the rear wheel and pull the bolts. Simple. You will have to pull the little piece of plastic doodad that holds on your plastic body parts if you have big mitts like mine but there are only 4 screws for that. When you put the shock back in, you can use the weight of the bike to move the rear suspension into place to make putting the bolts back in dead easy. Do the front first.... If it sounds like a lot of hassle, just look up air shocks for the V2K and be sitting down when you check the price.:eek:
Ya i looked all ready thats why when i saw this post i was extremely interested. I am about 225 and my wife is 200ish, then trunk and saddle bags, and i wanted to get a camper tailer thing, some point and time. so was trying to figure out what i need for suspension.
Did not realize the shock and spring asm. came out so easy, that should not be an issue. I just had not looked into it really.
 

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I would send my shock to Race Tech and have them rebuild it with the weight requirements for me and the wife and luggage, with a correct spring for that weight, and revalve it.
 

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I just installed the Ohlins aftermarket shock-pricey but it works great!! I can adjust it on the fly while riding, when I'm riding solo the ride is very similar to stock. When riding with my better half and loaded down with luggage, with my stock shock it sagged, headlight faced the sky, and we regularly bottomed out. Now the bike rides level when 2-up, the ride is smoother, no more bottoming outgrew glad I made the change


Sent from Motorcycle.com Free App
 

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On Amazon you can get a progressive suspension stock height shock for $370.27 right now. Other thread suggest this is a worth while upgrade for a heavily loaded bike.
 
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