Kawasaki Vulcan Forum banner

1 - 20 of 65 Posts
J

·
Guest
Joined
·
0 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Of our five bikes, it seems that my '06 Vulcan 2000 has the most inaccurate speedometer of the bunch. Out on I-90, which is a 75 mph interstate, I have to go 85 indicated to match most of the traffic. The county recently set up one of those trailer-mounted portable 'your speed', radar things by the side of a frontage road near our house. If I hold 60 indicated as I approach it, it will flash between 53 and 54 as I pass by.

Some is always to be expected with today's motorcycles, but that right there is a butt-load of speedo error. :mad:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
553 Posts
They make devices to fix this. I have had one on my bike for a couple of years now. Speedohealer is the one I think I got.
Or something like that.

Easy hook up and program 1 time and forget.

It was off 10%.

Now matches GPS just fine.

Stupid that they make these things so inaccurate.
 
J

·
Guest
Joined
·
0 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
I'll get around to installing a Speedohealer sooner or later, assuming I'll keep the bike at least another season.
 
J

·
Guest
Joined
·
0 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Stupid that they make these things so inaccurate.
Why on earth don't they settle for just a little inaccurate rather than nearly uselessly so. I've owned a lot of motorcycles, and I've never had a single one of them read slower than they were actually going.

The only motorcycle that I've had any first-hand experience with that read within one mph of it's actual speed was my wife's 2003 V-Rod.

Our Ford Fusion is nuts-on at all speeds too.

It's probably a good thing that aircraft don't use motorcycle instrumentation, there'd be a lot more smoky holes in pastures than there are now if they did.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,988 Posts
Subtracting 10% from the indicated speed is close enough for figuring on the fly. Assuming stock (non-Euro) gearing, pulleys, and rear tire size.
 
J

·
Guest
Joined
·
0 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
Subtracting 10% from the indicated speed is close enough for figuring on the fly. Assuming stock (non-Euro) gearing, pulleys, and rear tire size.
I do that all the time, and yes, it's easy to do, but I won't just shrug off the fact that I even need to do that much. I just want a speedometer that's accurate within a few percent at the least, on principal if nothing else. I can deal with the truth, give me the info, dammit!
 

·
Bike Of The Year Winner, 2012
Joined
·
4,906 Posts
I've always read it's universal to most bikes.

Do a google search. You will see it's not just the V2K, or Kawi.. it's most bikes.
 
J

·
Guest
Joined
·
0 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
I've always read it's universal to most bikes.

Do a google search. You will see it's not just the V2K, or Kawi.. it's most bikes.
I don't need to do a google search on this subject, unfortunately I'm an expert by experience on this stuff. I've owned fifty motorcycles, my wife an additional seventeen, out of those sixty-seven bikes, one has had an accurate speedometer, and none of them ever read on the slow side, all were as they say 'optimistic'.

I don't expect that anything will ever be done, I just like to whine about it every now and then.

:D
 
J

·
Guest
Joined
·
0 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
I am more worried about the mileage. Is that a 10% difference?
answer me that
No. The odometers are reasonably close, and I believe that they have a tighter allowable plus/minus error factor than speedometers are required to have.
 
J

·
Guest
Joined
·
0 Posts
Discussion Starter #15 (Edited)
It can only be that the manufacturers simply consider the riders of their motorcycles too immature to be 'trusted' with accurate mph numbers, and that by providing deliberately false speed readings, they feel that they are doing the responsible thing by creating the illusion of dangerously daredevil speeds, when the reality is....something less. No government entity requires that the manufacturers do this, it's entirely voluntary on their part.

I can live with it, but at it's core, it's actually quite insulting.

Lord only knows how many lives have been saved with this strategy.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,186 Posts
I have a GPS installed on my bars that I actually use as my speedo. The speedo is consistently 10 mph off when I ride. 95 on the speedo is only 85 in real life. I have checked by radar trailers on the side of the road at several speeds. In the end, the stock speedo is useless. I am having Euro gears installed while the bike is having some work done so I will report back with how they affect the speedo.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,186 Posts
It can only be that the manufacturers simply consider the riders of their motorcycles too immature to be 'trusted' with accurate mph numbers, and that by providing deliberately false speed readings, they feel that they are doing the responsible thing by creating the illusion of dangerously daredevil speeds, when the reality is....something less. No government entity requires that the manufacturers do this, it's entirely voluntary on their part.

I can live with it, but at it's core, it's actually quite insulting.

Lord only knows how many lives have been saved with this strategy.
I think it would be more along the lines that they are allowed to have a variance in accuracy (7% if memory serves) and instead of erring on the side of too fast, they err on the side of too slow...

Now break in periods? I think that's the exact reason. Especially on sport bikes. They don't want a guy leaving the dealer, cranking the throttle, pulling the front tire off the ground, and laying the damn thing down. I am under the school of thought that you should break the bike in the way you are going to ride it. Meaning, I don't have a break in period. I ride it like I stole it right off the showroom floor. The only exception to that being I try to change the cruising RPM by using 4th and 5th for awhile so you don't have it sitting in the same rev range for extended periods of time. Alas, this is a topic that doesn't matter in this forum anymore...
 
J

·
Guest
Joined
·
0 Posts
Discussion Starter #18
I think it would be more along the lines that they are allowed to have a variance in accuracy (7% if memory serves) and instead of erring on the side of too fast, they err on the side of too slow.
Whether they're 'allowed' to have a 7-10% of error in their speedometers or not is no excuse for always maximizing that error to the highest value allowable. In this day and age of precision manufacturing it's just as easy to make an accurate speedometer as it is a reasonably accurate odometer or any other instrument.

Of course, there will be some deviation from tire wear and a few other variable factors, but nothing like a consistent 10% to the high side.

It's inexcusable. An instrument that is deliberately designed to show false information is pointless.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,186 Posts
Whether they're 'allowed' to have a 7-10% of error in their speedometers or not is no excuse for always maximizing that error to the highest value allowable. In this day and age of precision manufacturing it's just as easy to make an accurate speedometer as it is a reasonably accurate odometer or any other instrument.

Of course, there will be some deviation from tire wear and a few other variable factors, but nothing like a consistent 10% to the high side.

It's inexcusable. An instrument that is deliberately designed to show false information is pointless.
I wasn't saying it was right, I'm just saying they're allowed... And I agree. I've never had a bike that was correct.
 
J

·
Guest
Joined
·
0 Posts
Discussion Starter #20 (Edited)
It's not a very big deal in practice, but it's kind of a big deal in principal.

To the manufacturers: Stop playing silly mind-games and just make your speedometers read close to the actual speed, willya? I know you can do it. If you made your engines with 7-10% slop in their manufacturing, they'd blow up before getting out of the driveway, or wouldn't run at all.
 
1 - 20 of 65 Posts
Top