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Discussion Starter #1
Ok, so I've heard that a wet clutch that isn't used often will get sticky. This 09 had 4k on it when I bought it maybe five/six weeks ago and it wanted to lunge off the line no matter how much I played the clutch and throttle. I've since put 750 miles on her and a miraculous transformation suddenly took place over the last two rides. I put on about a 100 miles each time.

That said, it's been two rides since the upgrade to a 17T drive sprocket, where I noticed a slight easing on the clutch, but this ride today, she was totally different. I don't think it was entirely the sprocket, so I'm wondering if I hit some threshold on clutch usage and she finally broke back in.

Would this explain the difference? She went from real torquey to smooth as butter on clutch play in a matter of two rides. Does a sticky clutch under these conditions finally do this?
 

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Discussion Starter #2
Took it for another run today, not quite a hundred miles. Runs like a different, better bike. Especially since the Ozarks are hilly, almost all the stops are at inclines. When the clutch was sticky, it was hell most of the time making a smooth takeoff. Now, I don't worry about it at all, braking/playing the clutch from an incline. Like butter.
 

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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
No idea, except for a car clutch.

You prompted me to do a search. Watched a castrol vid on how a clutch works. Interesting. I didn't know about the multiple clutch plates, and that also how friction additives cause the clutch to slip and viscosity causes the plates to stick. Cool.

I would have to say like you said that maybe some of the plates were sticking together so when I let off the clutch, they had the tendency to pre-advance power, hence sudden takeoffs. At least in my mind I have some options to consider.

The PO said he had the 4k oil change, maybe it was sticky already from very infrequent riding and just warmup idling/no real clutch engagement.

Thanks for the response and prompt.
 

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I had problem with clutch recently. Bike was kinda jumpy, like there is almost no friction zone, it was pain in the a*s to turn on intersection, bike just jumps from stop. After readjusting clutch lever (adding more freeplay) and shifting aggressively down the road, everything came back to normal. Guess the clutch plates got sticky or something. I don't ride very much (1 time weekly)
 

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Discussion Starter #7
That would explain some things. Guess if I let her sit any time and take her out, after a warm-up, I might be a bit hard on the clutch to get/keep her in shape, otherwise ride her normal.
 

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It's not high on the list of causes, but play close attention to the oil and it's level. The vacuum petcock shutoff on these bikes is notoriously lousy and if the float needles don't seat perfectly, gas will drain into the engine. Prolonged exposure to gassy engine oil can swell the friction plates.

After much fiddling, cleaning and replacing the petcock on mine, I added an inline fuel shut-off. I don't use it at a lunch stop, for example, but after a day's riding, I shut it off.

Smell the oil. It'll always smell gassy to a degree, but it shouldn't be overpowering. Remember, these are wet clutches and the engine oil can impact operation. If you ever notice the oil level *rising*, you have gas leak-down issues.



I'm sure you already know, but NEVER use regular car oil in a wet clutch bike - the friction modifiers screw up the clutch. But that'll cause slipping. There are auto store oils like Shell Rotella T4 (dinosaur oil) and T6 (synthetic oil) that are safe - no friction modifiers.
 

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Not an oil thread!

I'm sure you already know, but NEVER use regular car oil in a wet clutch bike - the friction modifiers screw up the clutch. But that'll cause slipping. There are auto store oils like Shell Rotella T4 (dinosaur oil) and T6 (synthetic oil) that are safe - no friction modifiers.
Let's not start an oil thread please.

I am going to have to disagree with you Phreon regarding engine oil choice. An automotive engine oil can be used if that oil is chosen carefully. I have used Pennzoil 10W40 in both my bikes for many years with no apparent ill effects.

Make sure that the oil you choose does NOT say "Energy Conserving" anywhere on the package! Rotella, most diesel oils, do not have these words on them.

These have been my experiences. YMMV
 

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Let's not start an oil thread please.

I am going to have to disagree with you Phreon regarding engine oil choice. An automotive engine oil can be used if that oil is chosen carefully. I have used Pennzoil 10W40 in both my bikes for many years with no apparent ill effects.

Make sure that the oil you choose does NOT say "Energy Conserving" anywhere on the package! Rotella, most diesel oils, do not have these words on them.

These have been my experiences. YMMV
That's why I said, "never use regular car oil" and specifically mentioned friction modifiers as well as as example oils that are fine. I exclusively use Rotella in my motorcycles. Perhaps I should have clarified that I meant, "these days, most regular car oils contain friction modifiers that will screw up the clutch". Rotella T6 isn't exactly a regular car oil. Which is why I mentioned it.

I'm in no way stating you have to use wallet draining, moto specific oils.
 

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Simple solution: use 'wet clutch' oil only. Don't have to worry about what type of car oil it is if you don't use it. If you're in the US you have Amazon and a ridiculous number of auto stores, you'll find bike oil eventually.
 
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