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Discussion Starter #61
Thanks Tinker for the great instructions. I did the flush today, only had to flush twice as was not too bad on my 2012 Voyager with 13,300 miles. Filled with Engine Ice and hope to be good for a few years. Changed spark plugs and put chrome polish on heads as long as it was apart too. Nice feeling to have this done.
Good to know this thread is still of use.

I changed the plugs on my first one too. It was a waste of money. The plugs in it are probably good for 100k miles.
 

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This is the first time I have tried posting with pic's so bear with me if it takes me a while to complete all of it.

I have now done this twice two my own 1700's and have learned some things that may make it easier for some one doing it the first time.

To begin with there are no special tools needed



What you see in the above pic is all you will need to do the job and yes that is a cheap HF 1/4 inch drive ratchet set and a .99cent pair of needle nose pliers.The only things not there are the small screw driver, small funnel, and mc jack I used. If you are not familiar with the CRC 2-26 it is similar to WD 40 only better. It is plastic safe and is available at most auto parts stores that carry other CRC products.

I forgot to mention this the first time through: While you have the tank off it is a good time to clean and polish the head covers, so it's good to have some chrome polish handy as well.

Starting with the tank removal: Remove the acorn nut and 2 4mm allen screws from the bezel. Place a peace of tape across the ignition ring and with slight upward pressure rock the bezel back and forth and side to side till the ring pops off. On my Nomad it only takes a couple of rocks to pop it up but the Voyager took a lot more rocking. The ring can be pride up but you take the risk of marring the finish of the bezel or the plastychrome on the ring. If you don't put tape across the ring when it releases you will be chasing it around the garage if it doesn't smack you in the face. Next remove the 2 bolts and the bracket at the base of the tank. Then raise the back of the tank and put a block of wood or like I did a tire brush under it and remove the vent hose from the right rear of the tank




You can see in the above pic the location of the vent hose and the brush holding the tank up to give access.

The Nomad vent hose is on the front of the tank.

Next: under the left side of the tank you will see an electrical plug and the fuel line. The electrical plug has a small retainer that must be raised to allow it to unplug


Next: Place a paper towel under the fuel line coupler
and using the same small screw driver insert it into the bottom of the red square "u" shaped retainer on the fuel line. Rock the screwdriver back and forth and the retainer will pop off easily. Don't take the retainer off the coupler just disengage it, then slide the fuel line off. There should only be a drop or to of fuel that will leak out and the paper towel will catch it.
Thanks for your post. I just flushed the coolant of my Voyager 1700 and replaced my thermostat. Your pics and advice was priceless!!!!!!!!!
 

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Discussion Starter #63
Thanks for your post. I just flushed the coolant of my Voyager 1700 and replaced my thermostat. Your pics and advice was priceless!!!!!!!!!
Good to know this old post is still helping people do their own. This service is not hard or complicated but time consuming. For a shop to do it right they would have to charge 4 to 5 hundred dollars.
 

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I did the flush last weekend. This thread was extremely useful, specially the part of how to move the cross-pipe without disconnecting the rectifiers. I have a vaquero so I had to remove the lower part of the fairing too. There's one extra thing I did: the manual calls for changing the hoses at 4 years. My bike is a 2012 that I bought brand new in 2014 (left over). So, is 4 year old with 2 years of service. Anyway, I thought that after all the work it would be worth to do that. I bought the 5 hoses for about 59 bucks in partzilla.com. It took me almost an hour to replace them because I was careful. I found out that the hose going to the front cylinder had a very small leak on the top. That explained the reason why sometimes I smelled the coolant and I found the reserve tank almost empty. So it was worth. The only hose I could not replace was the one at the bottom of the radiator (the easiest one!), since the back clamp had the screw impossible to reach (hidden). I should had cut it but had no replacement. So, next time I do the flush I'll replace that one.
Another thing worth to change (I'll do it next time) is the thermostat. Thermostats wear out and they open less and less over time. Then the flow is restricted and you start having heat issues. I filled up with engine ice. Haven't noticed any difference so far but I haven't ridden for long.
 

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Discussion Starter #65
Update! I will be performing this service along with some others to a recently purchased 2010 1700 so new pics not held hostage by photo hosting sights will be available soon.
 

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Update! I will be performing this service along with some others to a recently purchased 2010 1700 so new pics not held hostage by photo hosting sights will be available soon.
How did you make out? I bought a 2014 Nomad 1700 this past spring. It has about 28,000 miles on it. I have some extra coolant so thinking of changing it as I do not know the history. Think it's worth doing the plugs? they are probably original. What about other things like the thermostat, air filter, etc Anything I should be doing at the same time?
 
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