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Discussion Starter #1
hey guys has anyone checked there steering head bearing torque and can you let me know what size socket for the upper nut i think itslike a 35 or 36mm but i dont have a thin wall to fit ...what is the proper size? also can you let me know the spec for the bearing ?
 

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It's a 36mm. I got mine at Lowes and it fits just fine, no need to turn it down. If by bearing spec you mean the torque value on that head nut, it is 80 ft lbs.
 

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I would have to double check but I believe when I read that in my 2009 Vulcan Manual there is a slotted span nut that you turn down until your steering feels right. Then you torque the cap nut onto said slotted nut to lock in the setting.

Harley has also adopted this method since the older design of just torquing the bearings directly cause premature wear in the bearings.
 

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Information taken from the service manual.

For the Steering Stem Head Nut, the one on top of the triple clamp.

Install the washer [A] and the steering stem head nut .
Torque - Steering Stem Head Nut: 108 N·m (11.0 kgf·m, 80
ft·lb)


For the Steering Stem Nut. (The one that controls the stem bearings tightening)
• Settle the inner races in place as follows.
Tighten the steering stem nut with 55 N·m (5.6 kgf·m, 41
ft·lb) of torque first, and loosen it a fraction of a turn until
it turns lightly. Afterward tighten it again with specified
torque using a stem nut wrench [A] in the direction shown.
○Check that there is no play and the steering stem turns
smoothly without rattles. If not, the steering stembearings
may be damaged.
Special Tool - Steering Stem Nut Wrench: 57001-1100
Torque - Steering Stem Nut: 29 N·m (3.0 kgf·m, 22 ft·lb)
 

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I checked and mine says that too. I'm wondering how I would get my torque wrench to that span wrench. I'm thinking just snug it up till the front end still turns easily with no play when you pull on the forks.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
great guys thanks for all the info looks like i got some work to do this week finding that special tool for the job
 

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I checked and mine says that too. I'm wondering how I would get my torque wrench to that span wrench. I'm thinking just snug it up till the front end still turns easily with no play when you pull on the forks.
Past bikes I had, the service manual had a definitive lbs. number for steering play to check stem bearing tightness, Kawasaki just recommends free play in left to right swinging of the front end.

Steering Play Inspection
• Raise the front wheel off the ground (see Front Wheel
Removal in the Wheels/Tires chapter).
• With the front wheel pointing straight ahead, alternately
tap each end of the handlebar. The front wheel should
swing fully left and right from the force of gravity until the
fork hits the stop.
If the wheel binds or catches before the stop, the steering
is too tight.
• Feel for steering looseness by pushing and pulling the
forks.
If you feel looseness, the steering is too loose.
 

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great guys thanks for all the info looks like i got some work to do this week finding that special tool for the job
Harbor Freight used to have a hinged one that would fit several sizes. It wasn't much money. If you can't find one, you can always just tap it with a blunt pin and hammer. Harley has a Star Nut and that's how they are done, with standard screwdriver and hammer till it's snug.

Past bikes I had, the service manual had a definitive lbs. number for steering play to check stem bearing tightness, Kawasaki just recommends free play in left to right swinging of the front end.

Steering Play Inspection
• Raise the front wheel off the ground (see Front Wheel
Removal in the Wheels/Tires chapter).
• With the front wheel pointing straight ahead, alternately
tap each end of the handlebar. The front wheel should
swing fully left and right from the force of gravity until the
fork hits the stop.
If the wheel binds or catches before the stop, the steering
is too tight.
• Feel for steering looseness by pushing and pulling the
forks.
If you feel looseness, the steering is too loose.
Thanks for the info, Kawa is not the only mfgr with holes in their manuals. They all have some ambiquous lines. The Harley manual reccomends torqueing the clutch locking nut on the adjustment, but nobody does it cause you can't get a torque wrench on it. (unless you weld a nut on a socket so you can get the hex thru at the same time, and then put open end torque adapter on the socket)
 
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