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Discussion Starter #1
I bought a used set of pipes, off of a 2010 900 Custom that were debaffled to stage 1, for installation and further debaffeling in stages on my 2010 900 Classic LT.

When I pulled off the original pipes, I was surprised to discover that only the front pipe had an exhaust gasket installed. :eek: I wonder if that is part of a cost saving measure for Kawi..... :D So, I cleaned out the debris in the port and installed new exhaust gaskets in both ports.

Installation of the used pipes, wasn't as easy as I'd hoped. I had a heck of a time getting the rear pipe into the port and the flange over the studs, but finally it just popped right on. Everything else went pretty smooth and quick until I got to the front pipe frame hangers. The left bolt holes matched up, but the right bolt holes are about 1/8" off and I can't get a bolt into it. I don't know if all Custom pipes would fit the same on a Classic bike or not, but it's something to ponder if you're looking at doing the same thing.

These bolts fit through large rubber grommets with steel caps. I could probably remove them and grind down one side to allow me to install the bolt, but I'm not sure it's necessary or even that it would work.....

I finished tightening and torquing the bolts and went out for a ride to check out the new sound. :) It's definitely an improvement over the stock pipes, perhaps 20% louder. I'll ride it that way for a while, but I'm pretty sure that I'll go to stage 2 and drill 4 holes in the baffles.

Has anyone drilled the holes in the baffles without removing the end cap first? I'm considering trying to do that.
 

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Just curious, but how in the world would you drill out the baffles without removing the end cap when the baffle is behind that plate?

I have 8 holes drilled in mine and the center screen removed and I love it. Loud enough to get attention under power. But quiet enough to talk to a buddy at idle. Also, I can now hear my bike on take-off when I am in a crowd of Harleys.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Just curious, but how in the world would you drill out the baffles without removing the end cap when the baffle is behind that plate?
Perhaps I don't understand the process. I thought that stage 2 is just drilling holes in the end of the baffle, such as you describe below. Regardless, to answer your question, I figured I'd drill some large holes in the end plate, then drill as many holes as I want in the end of the baffles by using a drill extension through the large holes in the end cap.

My reasoning is first, that the end cap with clean, painted holes would look better than having no end cap and the cut pipe showing. Second, it might have a beneficial effect on the sound, as a small, partial echo chamber.

I have 8 holes drilled in mine and the center screen removed and I love it. Loud enough to get attention under power. But quiet enough to talk to a buddy at idle. Also, I can now hear my bike on take-off when I am in a crowd of Harleys.
Cool, thanks for the description! I'm going to go slow with it. I don't think that I want to hear my bike over a crowd of Harleys. :p Most of the Harley's I've seen are much too loud for my tastes and I have a severe hearing loss.

My goal is to have the sound about equal to the engine noise that I hear at higher freeway speeds, when I'm at those speeds. I don't want it louder than that, especially for long rides on the freeway. The engine noise at those speeds is already too loud for me... :( I'd like to have the ability to talk to companion riders and passengers via wireless, without having the pipes drown out the conversations.
 

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Kerry,
I was thinking about doing something similar. The end cap appears to be held in place with a few rivets. It would be pretty easy to drill them out, drill holes in the baffle and then rivet the end cap back in place. I also thought about not drilling any holes in the end caps since there is space around the edges for airflow. I could always add holes if needed and depending on the final sound.
 

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I saw a picture on a 800 page that looked like our pipes with the holes drilled right through the back cover. Looked like you'd imagine, an angled cap with 6 holes in it.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Kerry,
I was thinking about doing something similar. The end cap appears to be held in place with a few rivets. It would be pretty easy to drill them out, drill holes in the baffle and then rivet the end cap back in place. I also thought about not drilling any holes in the end caps since there is space around the edges for airflow. I could always add holes if needed and depending on the final sound.
My caps don't have much, if any real space around the edges, so it seems doubtful that mine would work well that way. You do have a good idea with the rivets. There are 3 in mine. It'd be easy to remove the caps, drill the baffles and then put holes or cutouts in the caps and paint them before reattaching them. Yes, I like that. Much easier to do a professional style layout of the holes or cutouts and use a drill press or band saw to make the cuts. With the 2 caps fastened together prior to cutting, it'd be a cinch to do quickly and have matching caps. It would look much better when done, seems to me. I've got some flat black, high temp spray cans already. Be a good project for Sat night. :cool:
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I saw a picture on a 800 page that looked like our pipes with the holes drilled right through the back cover. Looked like you'd imagine, an angled cap with 6 holes in it.
So, did it look cheesy (swiss) ? Or did it look nicer than the normal open end with the cut pipe looking at you?
 
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