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Discussion Starter #1
Looking at the service manual, it is pretty clear how to find TDC for the front cylinder. You turn the bolt found under the timing inspection plate and align the marks in the window. But for finding TDC for the rear piston, it says to refer to Crankshaft installation in the Crankshaft section, which has no information on how to get to TDC on the rear cylinder. So that's question #1.
Question #2: looking at the valves, how do I tell which is the intake and which is exhaust? I know these questions are pretty basic but I have to ask..... cause the shop manual sucks at being descriptive.....And finally, in the manual it states Caution, do not put shim stock under the shim. This may cause the shim to pop out at high rpm, which even I know would be a slight issue. What are they referring to when they talk about shim stock. Are they placing two shims under the rocker arm?

Thanks in advance for any help......
 

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Discussion Starter #2
Ok, scratch question #1. The manual says to go to the Crankshaft install page when the information is really on the Camshaft, Camshaft Chain section. I see the difference in the marks in the timing inspection plate. So now, I only need to figure out which valve is intake and which one is exhaust. From a logical perspective, I would expect the valve on the left (facing forward) to be the intake, and the right side valve the exhaust, since the exhaust pipes are on the right.... Not sure if I am correct though. It seems to me that from many years ago when working on small engines, the intake valve was larger than the exhaust, but not sure if this follows through with a MC.
 

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Walt, on mine, when either piston is top dead center, there's a distinct line on the cam sprocket that lays parallel to the piston top.

Intake valves are the ones nearest the adjacent cylinder, because the intake ports are between the cylinders. The exhaust valves are on the front of the front cylinder, and on the rear of the rear cylinder.

Enjoy--Mark
 

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The valves at the front of the front cylinder, and the rear of the rear cylinder are exhaust valves. This is where the exhaust ports, and pipes are. There are two intake, and two exhaust valves per cylinder. Normally, you can easily find TDC on a cylinder by removing the spark plugs, and then turning the engine over by hand. The engine rotates clockwise when viewed from the right side of the bike, and counter-clockwise when viewed from the left.
While turning the engine in its normal rotation, place your finger over the spark plug hole and at some point you will feel pressure from the air trying to escape(compression stroke). At the point where the the pressure stops and than a suction begins, you have found TDC. This is accurate enough to adjust the valves at that point. In most cases, the intake valves are larger since the intake of air relies on the atmospheric pressure to push the intake air past the valves. The exhaust valves are smaller due to the positive force of the piston to push the exhaust out of the cylinder.

Oops, mbw beat me to this one!
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks for the quick replies. I see the orientation now in the drawings. I just had the front of the cylinder in the wrong place...Duh. :) This is going to be a great new experience for me......It's logical to have both intakes in the center and exhaust to the outside, now that I think about it.........
 

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Discussion Starter #6 (Edited)
Ok, my first valve adjustment is under my belt, and I found pretty much the same that MrClean did, which meant that no changes were necessary. Everyone of the valves, both intake and exhaust were well within tolerances.... Which lends credibility to the 25,000 mile check that the manual recommends for Canadian Kaw.'s. And here I thought that the Canadians fed their Kaw.'s some other type of grass to keep them satisfied......I would have been really upset if I had spent $250, (which is cheap next to some of the dollar amounts that have been tossed around in this forum on this service item) only to find that no adjustment was necessary. So, I can't say that the engine is any quieter, and the ticking has become an old noise friend....would have almost hated to lose it. :) As many have explained before, the process is a piece of cake, with the only essential tool besides a micrometer being the swivel point pencil magnet. I know my fat narley fingers would never have been able to pick out and replace that little 1/4" shim without the magnet. I also made sure that the rubber o-rings on the spark plug tube had plenty of grease on them before reinserting. The jury is still out on whether I cut either on of them up as I have only run the engine in the garage yesterday and did not get a chance to road test. Ran out off time.....
So, to anyone thinking about doing the valve adjustment, at least at the 15000 mile adjustment, it's a piece of cake to accomplish, much like MrClean and mbwarner have indicated. Thanks guys for all the information and support, I now feel just a little closer to Agnes now that I know a little more of what makes her tick!
 
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