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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I didn't come up with this. Frankly, I don't know if I can come up with the originator as I've seen three different posters. Could be like minds, could be people just passing on info. That's what I am doing.

Now, I know I'm lazy. I know I'm cheap. But WHY didn't I get around to doing this sooner? I do have a Sears Motorcycle jack. Got it on sale for a price after rebate of about 35 bucks. Not bad for a 70ish list jack. It has full-filled my every need. I can jack the bike up to a nice height, strap it down and move it around my garage as needed and I have needed. But sometimes you just need to get a wheel up and don't need to go through the trouble of getting the bike up straight (I use a HF front wheel chock) and then positioning the jack and getting it up and strapped. Takes about 10 minutes for me to get the jack out of storage till the bike is up. No complaints.

But what if I just need to spin a wheel, change the oil or adjust the rear pulley like I did today?
This jack takes 30 seconds? Depending on where you store it. Make sure the bike is in the correct position. Slide the jack under the bike and position it to lift the front or rear. Straighten the front wheel up and pull the bike up level. Push the jack lever down till the bike stands up on the board. Slide the pole halfway ensuring that the boards can't tip back either direction(safety feature).

How do you make it?

Acquire two boards, 40 inches long. For most bikes I'm told, 2x8's are sufficient and that has proven so with the 900. If you have a really low slung bike, maybe 2x6's would do. Frankly, I think 40 inches is overkill but I had the wood and it was the suggested length. Glue and screw the wood together giving you for all effect a 4x8x40 inch long board. (okay, I know the dressed size is smaller, you get the point)
Acquire a 4 foot section of pipe or something for a handle. Pipe works best for because you can just drill through the boards the correct size hole for the pipe. Fencing T-posts might be pretty difficult. Come in from one end of the board and drill a hole all the way through both boards, perpendicular to them, for the pipe. For longevity, if you can find one to fit, attach a metal washer cover for the hole to keep it from wallowing out over time.

My Jack? I bought a new truck this spring and after a couple of trips to the store with the groceries being at all sorts of places in the bed, I decided to put a board across the back and as I had the jack in mind, I bought a 2x8. Just before I cut the wood I noticed that Ford had already put a notch in the bed JUST for that purpose. Heck, maybe they all do. So I measure twice, cut once and was about an inch short! Seriously. I had a 2x6 left over from last years deck build to double the 2x8 with. I figured it would be good enough. Well, the wife had pity on me and told me to spend the extra 5 bucks and buy a new one (they were on sale, don't know what they usually go for, didn't ask just told the wife they were on sale)

So now, after a little trimming, I had the two 40 inch pieces. But I couldn't find anything to use for the lever. All I have is a couple pieces of Copper tubing and that's too flimsy. A piece of galvanized 3/4 inch plumbing would be perfect. Too bad I don't have any. But a friend of mine at work had a big, aluminum pipe he had used as a cheater on a pipe wrench. It's threaded on one side and tougher then you'd think. He didn't know what it was used for originally. I actually had a spade bit the right side, so the cost for me was NOTHING!!!

Here's a picture of the bike up on the jack with the handle half way over.


Too let the bike down, put the handle flush with the bottom of the board, pull up on the handle slowly while holding the handlebars. Let the weight of the bike do the work. Set it down on the kickstand and slide the jack out from under the bike. 5 seconds and done. It is simplicity at it's best.

Now, if you go out and buy everything you'll probably have to spend 25 bucks. I think a 2x8x10s are about 10 bucks. 4 foot pipe is about 8. You'll need some screws and for glue I used Poly U glue but Hard as Nails or Elmers would do I'm sure. If you have a building project, just remember the size lumber you need and get that extra foot or two for the scrap pieces.
 

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That is so cool MrClean. I ran right out to the garage and made one and I'll be jiggered, it works perfectly. Thank you for bringing this to us.
 

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Nice Job ! I also made one a few months ago for my 1500. I ended up cutting a recess in the middle of mine so the frame was the only thing hitting the board, and also put some scrap carpet over the top so as not to scratch the paint on the frame. Plus this thing doesn't take up much room - just stands in the corner of the garage.
 

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Harbor Freight Jack

I went to Harbor Freight this past Sunday to buy their $99.99 Motorcycle/ATV jack. (Yellow) good for 1500 lb. Had a $20 on line coupon. Didn't see model on the floor. Girl pulled out a flyer for May 13-30 sale items. Listed it for $40 off.Gave it to me for sale price even though not started yet. Got it for $63.59 tax included. Put it together in 10 minutes. Came almost completely assembled. Works great and has safety lock mechanism.
 

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Tried to make one this weekend. I had the spare board laying around. Also had some 3/4" rebar about 5 foot long. The rebar did not work. I didn't know this, but rebar is made from really soft iron and will just bend when you apply pressure to it. I will buy a piece of pipe which will be more rigid. Just thought someone would like to learn from my mistakes.:D
 

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Harbor Frieght

Hi PK, any chance you might have the harbor freight number for the jack. just looked at the web site and didn't see anything by that description.

Thanks a lot:)
 

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Item #2792 at online store listed for $109.00
 

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Many Thanks

Thanks guys, appreciate the feedback.:)
 

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Same thing as MrClean's, different perspective:

http://www.nightrider.com/biketech/bikelift.htm

One thing i liked about this one is they suggested putting a couple of eyebolts into the edge for hooking up a tie-strap to put over the seat. Good idea for stability.
 

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I didn't come up with this. Frankly, I don't know if I can come up with the originator as I've seen three different posters. Could be like minds, could be people just passing on info. That's what I am doing.

Now, I know I'm lazy. I know I'm cheap. But WHY didn't I get around to doing this sooner? I do have a Sears Motorcycle jack. Got it on sale for a price after rebate of about 35 bucks. Not bad for a 70ish list jack. It has full-filled my every need. I can jack the bike up to a nice height, strap it down and move it around my garage as needed and I have needed. But sometimes you just need to get a wheel up and don't need to go through the trouble of getting the bike up straight (I use a HF front wheel chock) and then positioning the jack and getting it up and strapped. Takes about 10 minutes for me to get the jack out of storage till the bike is up. No complaints.

But what if I just need to spin a wheel, change the oil or adjust the rear pulley like I did today?
This jack takes 30 seconds? Depending on where you store it. Make sure the bike is in the correct position. Slide the jack under the bike and position it to lift the front or rear. Straighten the front wheel up and pull the bike up level. Push the jack lever down till the bike stands up on the board. Slide the pole halfway ensuring that the boards can't tip back either direction(safety feature).

How do you make it?

Acquire two boards, 40 inches long. For most bikes I'm told, 2x8's are sufficient and that has proven so with the 900. If you have a really low slung bike, maybe 2x6's would do. Frankly, I think 40 inches is overkill but I had the wood and it was the suggested length. Glue and screw the wood together giving you for all effect a 4x8x40 inch long board. (okay, I know the dressed size is smaller, you get the point)
Acquire a 4 foot section of pipe or something for a handle. Pipe works best for because you can just drill through the boards the correct size hole for the pipe. Fencing T-posts might be pretty difficult. Come in from one end of the board and drill a hole all the way through both boards, perpendicular to them, for the pipe. For longevity, if you can find one to fit, attach a metal washer cover for the hole to keep it from wallowing out over time.

My Jack? I bought a new truck this spring and after a couple of trips to the store with the groceries being at all sorts of places in the bed, I decided to put a board across the back and as I had the jack in mind, I bought a 2x8. Just before I cut the wood I noticed that Ford had already put a notch in the bed JUST for that purpose. Heck, maybe they all do. So I measure twice, cut once and was about an inch short! Seriously. I had a 2x6 left over from last years deck build to double the 2x8 with. I figured it would be good enough. Well, the wife had pity on me and told me to spend the extra 5 bucks and buy a new one (they were on sale, don't know what they usually go for, didn't ask just told the wife they were on sale)

So now, after a little trimming, I had the two 40 inch pieces. But I couldn't find anything to use for the lever. All I have is a couple pieces of Copper tubing and that's too flimsy. A piece of galvanized 3/4 inch plumbing would be perfect. Too bad I don't have any. But a friend of mine at work had a big, aluminum pipe he had used as a cheater on a pipe wrench. It's threaded on one side and tougher then you'd think. He didn't know what it was used for originally. I actually had a spade bit the right side, so the cost for me was NOTHING!!!

Here's a picture of the bike up on the jack with the handle half way over.


Too let the bike down, put the handle flush with the bottom of the board, pull up on the handle slowly while holding the handlebars. Let the weight of the bike do the work. Set it down on the kickstand and slide the jack out from under the bike. 5 seconds and done. It is simplicity at it's best.

Now, if you go out and buy everything you'll probably have to spend 25 bucks. I think a 2x8x10s are about 10 bucks. 4 foot pipe is about 8. You'll need some screws and for glue I used Poly U glue but Hard as Nails or Elmers would do I'm sure. If you have a building project, just remember the size lumber you need and get that extra foot or two for the scrap pieces.
I did it - and I must say it works like a charm !!! Thanks mate !!

Cheers from downunder
 

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I made one and it's a quick and great alternative to a floor jack.
Simple enough not to have around.
 

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hmmm..... I made the jack, using only screws and without gluing the boards together and when I tried to lift the bike (900 Classic LT), both boards split right down the middle, end to end. :mad::mad:

Detroit has really cheap wood.......

So, I'm gonna try again later. But, I want to make some mods to the jack. First, my 900 has engine parts and other stuff sticking out everywhere below the frame. It needs special cuts to hit the frame and nothing else. I also have a Harbor Freight cycle jack, apparently identical to the Sears cycle jack, that also needs some mods for it to work well with the 900, for the same reasons as the wood jack.

I'll figure out what the high spots need to be and when I get it working, will post the mods and procedures. Regardless, thanks to MrClean for posting this version. It's a good starting point, that's for sure.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
The only part that really was giving me problems was the grease points, but thanks to the sticky concerning them I took em out and put nuts on. Now I don't hit the zerks anymore.

But I do have notches in my boards to indicate where I need to run a hole saw down.
 

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An eight foot long 2x8 will give you two 42" pieces with a 12"piece leftover. I cut this piece down to ten inches and added it at the end for a little more support, and more thickness for the hole for the 3/4" pipe.



You'll need a 1-1/8" spade bit for the hole, and 2-1/2" screws and a tube of liquid nails or equivalent to do the job. Give the glue a couple of days to set up before using it.


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I went to Harbor Freight this past Sunday to buy their $99.99 Motorcycle/ATV jack. (Yellow) good for 1500 lb. Had a $20 on line coupon. Didn't see model on the floor. Girl pulled out a flyer for May 13-30 sale items. Listed it for $40 off.Gave it to me for sale price even though not started yet. Got it for $63.59 tax included. Put it together in 10 minutes. Came almost completely assembled. Works great and has safety lock mechanism.
I looked at the photo of this jack on the Harbor Freight website. Having never used one of these, here is my question: How do you know that you have the bike positioned such that it will not tilt forward or backward when you raise it up? How stable is the bike on the jack when it is raised?
 

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I looked at the photo of this jack on the Harbor Freight website. Having never used one of these, here is my question: How do you know that you have the bike positioned such that it will not tilt forward or backward when you raise it up? How stable is the bike on the jack when it is raised?
I have a jack similar to the HF lift, that I bought from Costco several years ago. I used it on my Gold Wings. To answer your question, you have to play with it a little to determine the balance point on your bike. Just slide it under the bike from the right side (as you sit on the bike) at what looks to be about the center point and slowly start to lift the bike. If the front wheel comes up but the rear wheel stays down, lower it and move it rearward, and visa versa if you are too far to the rear to start.

Once you've found the balance point, begin lifting the bike up. The bike will actually right itself level (side to side) as the lift beams rise. Most of the lifts come with tie downs to keep the bike stable once it is up where you want it. Then begin working on your bike once it's been secured. When you lower it back down, proceed slowly, especially as the tires reach the floor. I always hold onto the right handlebar just to be safe, and as the left goes all the way down, the bike will gradually lean over onto the side stand.

Hope this helps.
 

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I want to thank everyone for their input. What a simple idea to build your own. I did also see the lift at Harbor Freight that was mentioned and because of the wheels would make it easy to move around the garage. Look like two good choices. Thank you
 

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Discussion Starter #20
When the wood will work I use it because it is fast and easy. There are some things that I need the Big jack for, and use it then. Luckily the price of one made it affordable to have both.

There are times when I wish I had a full lift. Young back playing old at times. Oh well. If I could I'd have a full set of tools, shop, and all the time to play with them. I'd also have several folks dedicated to picking up after me, cleaning and doing the work I don't feel like doing so that it was done in time for me when I wanted to go ride.

How DO I get Jay Leno's gig?
 
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