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Discussion Starter #1
I’m sure many of you have had the unfortunate experience of going out to the garage on the first nice day of spring, you go to start up your lonely bike and click, click, click… nothing. You’ve got a dead battery and you didn’t even know it. But how would you?
Luckily, that’s an easy one. The comfort indicator from CTEK makes your battery level visible so you know exactly when your battery needs to be charged or if you are good to go! The easy to read traffic signal connects right onto your hard to reach battery and lets you know where your battery level is at all times. And if it is yellow or red indicating you need a charge, all you have to do is plug it right into your CTEK charger for a bit and you’re ready to roll again.
CTEK makes battery charging quick, safe and easy. Learn more at www.smartercharger.com
 

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Hmm. Seems like this if for those who only ride when it's 75 degrees and sunny, and only to the bar and back. If folks actually ride their bikes rather that let them sit in the garage all the time, dead batteries really shouldn't be much of an issue. I've never even needed a battery tender. Change the battery every 3 years or so, ride the bike, forget about it. Never gotten stranded in 20 years. I think I'd buy a $25 dollar battery tender if I ever let my bike sit that long, anyway.

Thanks for sharing, though.
 

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Hmm. Seems like this if for those who only ride when it's 75 degrees and sunny, and only to the bar and back. If folks actually ride their bikes rather that let them sit in the garage all the time, dead batteries really shouldn't be much of an issue. I've never even needed a battery tender. Change the battery every 3 years or so, ride the bike, forget about it. Never gotten stranded in 20 years. I think I'd buy a $25 dollar battery tender if I ever let my bike sit that long, anyway.

Thanks for sharing, though.
Must be nice to live where you can ride all the time. Some of us aren't so lucky. Here in Northern Indiana, the hardiest of us ride from 35 degrees fahrenheit on up, but that still means our bikes sit in the garage from December thru March. It's hard to ride when there's a 40 degree below zero windchill and two feet of snow on the road, dude.
 

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Must be nice to live where you can ride all the time. Some of us aren't so lucky. Here in Northern Indiana, the hardiest of us ride from 35 degrees fahrenheit on up, but that still means our bikes sit in the garage from December thru March. It's hard to ride when there's a 40 degree below zero windchill and two feet of snow on the road, dude.
Save it; I used to live in La Porte and still rode enough to not have dead batteries...dude.
 

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I don't ride from December thru March, and I've never had a dead battery either. But I always just considered myself lucky; I don't know how long it takes for a battery to go dead sitting in a garage.

I used to live in LaPorte too, and I don't remember seeing anyone ever riding in temps below freezing. Of course if I had, I would have thought the dude was batsh*t crazy.

Matter of fact, I rode out of town on a motorcycle trip to Orlando just a few weeks ago, on April 9th, and everyone thought I was batsh*t crazy then. It was 43 degrees and raining when I left, and the rain continued for the first four hours of the trip.
 

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I don't ride from December thru March, and I've never had a dead battery either. But I always just considered myself lucky; I don't know how long it takes for a battery to go dead sitting in a garage.

I used to live in LaPorte too, and I don't remember seeing anyone ever riding in temps below freezing. Of course if I had, I would have thought the dude was batsh*t crazy.

Matter of fact, I rode out of town on a motorcycle trip to Orlando just a few weeks ago, on April 9th, and everyone thought I was batsh*t crazy then. It was 43 degrees and raining when I left, and the rain continued for the first four hours of the trip.
There's only a few weeks in Jan/Feb that I don't get the bike out at least once; rain or shine. But, my main point is that the Battery Tender has proven itself for those who park their bikes for any length of time, and it's only $25 if someone shops around for one. I wasn't trying to bash fair-weather riders; just stating that most folks who park their bikes probably don't need a $75 gadget to get the job done. Take care.
 

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Not everybody rides up to your standards nor do they have to. My wife's bike is on a tender and she only rides on the weekends if her work load allows.
Again, my original post was pointing out those folks who park their bikes, or don't riding it far enough to charge the battery (when it's 75 degrees and sunny, and only to the bar and back.) Just stating how I see the intention of the product. I didn't ask anyone to follow my riding practices. Just stating that for those who ride often, there wouldn't be much benefit to this product.

It is what it is. Sorry if my intentions were misinterpreted.
 

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OK…I just want to make sure that we all know the difference between a “fair weather rider” and a “biker.” Please don’t think I’m trying to start some sh*t…I’m just speaking up for what I believe in. Just because one doesn’t ride their bike in the snow, does not make them a “fair weather rider.” I ride as much as possible. Rain or shine, I don’t care. I am a biker! Live to ride! Ride to live! :cool:
 
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