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Discussion Starter #1
Just got done installing the Scootworks front pulley today. I decided to install it based on all of the positive reviews it got on this fourm. I ordered it from Meancycles and recieved it within a weeks time. The install was pretty straight foward, but I think it does take some technicial know how, but not much. The only Pain in the butt part was adjusting the belt to the correct tenison. I do not have a belt gauge, but would recommend it. The exhaust pipes do not need to come off to remove the cotter pin to lossen the rear axle nut. Just some patience and long reach needle nose pliers will take care of it just fine. Just remember to reinstall it. The Original crank pulley nut was VERY tight, if done by hand you will need someone to sit on the bike and squezze the front AND rear brakes, but just remeber to bend the lock washer flat first. I found a Hammer and screwdriver makes quick easy work of that, and to rebend it when the new pulley is installed I found a pair of channel lock pliers very effective to bend it back. To keep the belt aligned correctly I took a measurment of how far the belt was from the outer lip of the stock front pulley. My measurment was .028" I used a feeler blade to measure it, when I installed the new pulley and started to tighten the belt I used the same feller blade to keep the belt at the same distance from the outer ridge of the pulley. I put everything back together and went for a very slow ride up the street. I heard a grinding noise almost right away, took the pulley covers back off and found the new pulley hitting the bottom right hand side bolt boss. I seen the marks it made, got the dremmel out and grinded some away, noise is now gone. Second road test cam a different noise. Found I had the belt to tight, I knida thought I did because it was harder to move the bike by foot when in nuetral, So I removed the cotter pin again, lossened the axle nut, and lossened up the belt a tad. Third road test, noise gone, but came back at a higher speed. So I went and lossened it again. Did this 4 Times before I got it right, so this was the pain in the butt part because I was to cheap to but a gauge. But after it is all said and done the belt noise is pretty much back to wear it was when stock(mine always had some belt noise) and it is not loud. Only can hear it when the clutch is pulled in when coasting or decell, But when cruising,accell, or decell you really cannot hear it. I used a verner caliper to adjust the rear wheel. I put the end of the caliper on the flat end of the rear adjuster bolt, and the depth end sat agaisnt the 17mm head adjuster nut(remove the 14mm lock nut). If you do this, you can almost get the rear wheel almost perfect from side to side rather then just eyeball it. I found on my bike .600" was perfect for belt tightness. After that i tighten the axle nut, then retighten the 17mm adjuster nut, then installed the 14mm lock nut. If I were to do it over again, I would not reinstall the cotter pin until all road test's and adjustments were done. As for the performance, It does help in a positive way. It seems you dont have to shift as much when cruising the neighborhood, and on the highway I used to get buzzness at 65MPH(70 on the speedo) and now the buzzness happens at 75MPH(which is correct on the speedo now:D). So it helped by giving me 10mph more relaxed cruising speed with almost no bottom end accel loss. I would say its worth it, but its no sixth gear, but every bit helps.
 

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Good read Kawieman, mine is on it's way from Meancycles due in mid week. Thanks for the install tips.
 

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I just completed a test ride after installing the front pulley. I seem to have lost that "pull me off the back of the bike" power I had. However, the bike runs smoothly through all gears.

My most noticeable difference is 1st-2d. Very nice now. Fourth gear is good to go through 50 mph. I ran it up to 70 with no noticeable buzziness. So for me, I like the change. I checked the MPH against a GPS and it is perfect. If my speedo reads 35, I amd going 35. When it reads 70, I am doing 70. I took the bike up to 80 and had some left. Nice ride!
 

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Add one more person to the list who like the front pulley swap. I now ride in 4th gear when staying around 55mph. When I ride the interstate system I ride in 5th gear and can now stay with the 4 wheel traffic without spinning the engine beyond what I fell is a comfortable engine speed. Yes, with no tach, proper engine speed is an opinion based on sound and feel. I don't get any buzz through the handlebars. Can now comfortably run 80mph if I choose (as in a lengthy ride across South Dakota) and have an accurate speedometer. I did not have the proper tools to install the pulley myself so had my local Kawasaki dealer do it. Cost a few dollars more but I am comfortable with their work and know it was done correctly - and the belt is straight with the proper tension. There is a noticeable drop in acceleration power in the high gears, but that's OK. I have a different bike for that sort of "sport" riding.
 

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Great review and install tips!
I'm still not sure that this is the mod for me, but I'm going to keep my eyes on this to see if you have any long term belt wear issues.
I'm REALLY glad that you do not have to put a 100-dollar speedometer correction box on the bike when you change the front sprocket (something my $16K HD REQUIRES for this change...:mad:)

Got my bag of popcorn here with me and watching...:cool:
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I have now driven approx 350 miles with the pulley, and no issue's so far. There is a bit of noise when decell around 40-30 mph, but thats it. You can usually only hear it with the clutch pulled in, but I have debaffled exhaust. I think it made a difference for the better. Kawasaki built a great bike (VN900) but it has many short commings. They really should have put a bigger engine in it, or at least have made a 1300cc model in a custom at least. The engine is so underpowered that they used aggressive gear ratio's to compensate for the lack of power. While this is somewhat normal practice on smaller and heavier bikes, it kills the top cruising speed. What the bike really needs is a bigger reduction in gear ratio from 4th-5th, and a overdrive ratio or at least a 1:1 ratio in 6th, but that would make production cost way to much and they would not be able to make there 1000% profit. That is why I am looking into buying a Mean Streak
 
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