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well, I am seeing wear and feeling more road and believe it is time to replace these OEM tires (2007 model). Obviously, i don't ride a lot but I am riding more and more and so I am looking for advice on the best tire for middle of the road budget. Obviously, there are a lot to choose from which is good and bad... Just need a direction. tire sizes are 130/90-16 front and 170/70-16 rear. I need good wet/dry traction, good, smooth ride, longevity and (yes i would like them to match).
Please respond quickly because I really dont want to ride much more without new good tires.
Jas.
 

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You've opened the can of worms again.
Asking this will give you no good answers since like oil usage everyone has their own opinion.

AND I'm not saying one is better than the other, but you wont get one answer over another.
Go to motorcyclesuperstore.com and research for yourself.
SORRY.
 

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Middle-of-the-road budget? Shinko makes several lines of tires that'll work. They hold the road well and are inexpensive.

They may not last as long as your more top dollar brands but they'll give you good, solid service and definitely lie within your budget parameters.

As vulcandoc says, there are many thoughts on tires. The fact is that most tires are good tires. A person's brand loyalty, brand recognition, planned use for them (if you're going to annually put a lot of miles on it or annually have low mileage use) and/or budget are all factors to use in your decision making tree.

The general subject of tires is pretty interesting and goes a bit deeper than some may think. Motorcycle tires aren't like car tires. They're softer. The age of the tires is just as important as how much tread is there. Like vulcandoc said, research for yourself on the subject of tires in general and age in particular and also how-to read the manufacturing date codes on the side of your tires. All tires, bikes and cars, have a series of alphanumeric symbols on them telling you the month and year they were made.

Essentially, educate yourself and make your own decision on what you want to do with your machine. You'll be happy with your decision.

And welcome to the forum!
 

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You've opened the can of worms again.
Asking this will give you no good answers since like oil usage everyone has their own opinion.
That's what he's asking for, Opinions!
 

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i think harder rubber tires have longer wear, less contact patch with the road, run cooler, last longer and get better gas mileage, softer rubber tires have more contact patch with the road when using less air pressure, run hotter and more grip, get less gas mileage, air pressure is important when riding 2-up
 

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I just stick with the OEM prescribed rubber. In this case the venerable Bridgestone Excedra. They work fairly well, last okay and handle well in the rain. I have leaned them over to the point of scraping under parts and floorboards and they stuck like they were supposed to. No complaints.

Cheers!

Mike
 

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I have been very pleased with the Michelin Commander II on several bikes. Interestingly I put a pair on my 1600 Classic and have worn out the front before the rear. Front needs replaced at 12k miles.

The one "gotcha" is that if you look up this tire for your bike, you won't find it. They make the 130/90/16 for the front, but they don't make the 170 series for the rear. You have to go with a 185/65/16, which fits with zero problems. These tires are great wet or dry. I have locked up the rear in "fresh rain" conditions but that can happen with any tire.

No matter what you choose, get rid of that old dry rotted OE rubber. 7 years is the recommended maximum age of tires regardless of mileage.
 

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I run the dog snot out of y Nomad and have to agree with Ahemsa. Commander II's are hard to beat will cost $30-40 more than a Shinko but if kept properly aired I get 12k on a set.
 

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I run the dog snot out of y Nomad and have to agree with Ahemsa. Commander II's are hard to beat will cost $30-40 more than a Shinko but if kept properly aired I get 12k on a set.
I've run the Commander II on 3 different bikes and love them. I've got a set on my Suzuki VS800GL Intruder... that bike has the ground clearance to allow me to not only take the head off the Michelin Man, I can take off the entire Man :) Sport bike sized chicken stripes on a Cruiser are unheard of. GREAT tires!
 

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I've had Shinko, Dunlop, and am now on my second set of Metzeler Marathon 888. They cost more, but I get so much more mileage from them compared to the others that it's cheaper in the long run. I think the Michelin Commanders are very similar in quality. It seems like the two companies are swapping the lead, with Marathon 880, Commander, 888's and Commander II.

But if you are just wearing out 10+ year old OEMs now, mileage life probably doesn't matter as much. You should be replacing based on age of the tires, not because they wore out. So the Shinko or Bridgestone will likely do you fine.
 
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