Kawasaki Vulcan Forum banner

1 - 13 of 13 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
36 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Both spark plugs were in tight. So I sprayed some carb cleaner in the holes and waited a couple of hours. The front then came with just a little effort. The back was still tight so I decided to spray more carb cleaner in it. This time, I noticed the liquid coming out the left side of the cylinder. When I looked closer, there appears to be a "seep" hole that looks like it could line up with where the spark plug is screwed in. It looks to be perfectly round and not cracked or chipped. Can someone confirm theirs has the same hole? If so, I'm wondering if it is to permit any water to run out if it is left out in the rain, since the bike leans to that side. This could also explain why the rear plug didn't loosen up like the front, since the liquid didn't have a chance to soak in.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,646 Posts
That is a drain for the spark plug column. Those rubber caps aren't waterproof under extreme conditions and you don't want liquid building up in the column. The weep holes keep it dry so you don't dump anything into the cylinder when you pull the plug.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
223 Posts
Penetrating oil may work much better than carb cleaner for loosening stuck hardware. Never heard of using carb cleaner before.

also, blow out the area around the plug before removing as a lot of crap collects there. Use anti-seize when reassembling.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
2,694 Posts
Found PB Blaster to be the best penetrating oil. Since the plug and the cylinder head are dissimilar metals, I second alwhite00’s suggestion to use anti seize. Torque the plugs to 13 inch pounds. If you did not buy the plugs yet, recommend using the iridium ones. CR7E1X
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,080 Posts
I don't know that I would recommend this but it has worked well to in my experience prevent spark plug seize - use engine oil on spark threads when installing. Actual anti-seize compound is recommended in the service manual.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
36 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
Thanks for the replies. My PB blaster ran out, so I chose the next thing I had available. The air cleaner was filthy when I pulled it out, (13,000 miles). Was thinking the original owner never replaced it, however, pulled the front plug, it was an Auto lite. Still doesn't mean it never replaced the air filter. I do plan on replacing them with the NGK.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
72 Posts
That weep hole also works as in indicator that your seals are failing. It is why I had oil seeping out of my engine block. (30,000 miles on my bike when it happened.)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
36 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
If you haven't bought the plugs yet, I would recommend the iridium plugs. They last longer and are generally more reliable.
I picked up a set today. They appear to be a couple of mm longer than what was in there though. Has anyone else looked at the difference in length between what was originally in the engines and the iridium plugs?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
770 Posts
Hmm, I seem to remember they were the same length. What part number are they? For the VN900, they should be CPR7EIAX-9, for the X series iridium plugs. Market number 9198.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,080 Posts
That's what I bought.
If you are comparing the lengths of the new iridium spark plugs with the Autolite plug which you extracted, remember that Autolite was not the usual OEM spark plug. Lengths of both the NGK OEM spark plugs on my VN900 and the new iridium ones I used to replace them were the same.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
36 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
If you are comparing the lengths of the new iridium spark plugs with the Autolite plug which you extracted, remember that Autolite was not the usual OEM spark plug. Lengths of both the NGK OEM spark plugs on my VN900 and the new iridium ones I used to replace them were the same.
thanks.
 
1 - 13 of 13 Posts
Top