Kawasaki Vulcan Forum banner

21 - 38 of 38 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
58 Posts
Discussion Starter #21
You are warned, getting a skinny tire on and off a rim is a bitch.
Thanks for the warning, texasnurse… I did some more research and had 2nd thoughts about the balancing part, and found someone who will mount online-ordered tires for me (some shops won't mount tires you didn't buy from them), so I'll save bucks by ordering online and by taking the wheel off myself, so will let a pro do the mounting & balancing... I'm independent-minded, but try not to be a sucker for punishment! :grin2:
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,535 Posts
I have had great luck with Dyna Beads. I plan to try Ride On next time that i change shoes on the Goblin.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,535 Posts
I am looking at a bead breaker though. My tire guy sold his shop. I really don't want to travel 30 miles each way to the dealership. And pay dealership prices. With a breaker , spoons and rim protectors about $100 i figure that they pay for themselves first pair of shoes ?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
58 Posts
Discussion Starter #25
One last question (hopefully!) before I tackle this...

To reinstall the rear sprocket, the shop manual says to replace the rear sprocket nuts with new ones... why??? And are they easy to get? Where?


Okay, 'nother question... 1st step in rear wheel installation says apply high-temperature grease to the grease seal lips... what/where are grease seal lips?


TIA!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,282 Posts
One last question (hopefully!) before I tackle this...



To reinstall the rear sprocket, the shop manual says to replace the rear sprocket nuts with new ones... why??? And are they easy to get? Where?





Okay, 'nother question... 1st step in rear wheel installation says apply high-temperature grease to the grease seal lips... what/where are grease seal lips?





TIA!


Seal lips are in the wheel hub itself.

Lube the axle shaft c a high temp(mystik jt6)
And slowly insert with a twisting motion


Saddle up and feel the wind in your Helmet! ATGATT
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,535 Posts
gonna go riding

One last question (hopefully!) before I tackle this...

To reinstall the rear sprocket, the shop manual says to replace the rear sprocket nuts with new ones... why??? And are they easy to get? Where?

TIA!
:surprise: I just put the old ones back on with blue Loctite. That was about 1200 miles ago when I changed out to a 43 tooth sprocket and have had no problems. as for the why there is always a bit of stretch and wear on fasteners. Not enough that I will worry about it for the first few sprocket and chain changes . However if you wanna support Ma Kaw

https://www.bikebandit.com/oem-parts/2015-kawasaki-vulcan-s-rear-wheel-chain/o/m156714sch893666
the performance guys like the aluminum or even titanium nuts .

https://www.sportbiketrackgear.com/driven-sprocket-nuts-10mm-x-1-25/?gclid=CjwKCAjw39reBRBJEiwAO1m0OQdsXK-2G-urZ_UiQco-DczWx0WIOoL8w2BPpMNGCXf9DjhFKRQWzRoCrJAQAvD_BwE

So if you are glass half empty kiinda rider replace 'em if yer glass is half full save the $30 and 5 days shipping time. go riding and enjoy the weather.. :grin2:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
58 Posts
Discussion Starter #28
:surprise: I just put the old ones back on with blue Loctite. That was about 1200 miles ago when I changed out to a 43 tooth sprocket and have had no problems. as for the why there is always a bit of stretch and wear on fasteners. Not enough that I will worry about it for the first few sprocket and chain changes . However if you wanna support Ma Kaw

https://www.bikebandit.com/oem-parts/2015-kawasaki-vulcan-s-rear-wheel-chain/o/m156714sch893666
the performance guys like the aluminum or even titanium nuts .

https://www.sportbiketrackgear.com/driven-sprocket-nuts-10mm-x-1-25/?gclid=CjwKCAjw39reBRBJEiwAO1m0OQdsXK-2G-urZ_UiQco-DczWx0WIOoL8w2BPpMNGCXf9DjhFKRQWzRoCrJAQAvD_BwE

So if you are glass half empty kiinda rider replace 'em if yer glass is half full save the $30 and 5 days shipping time. go riding and enjoy the weather.. :grin2:
Thanks for the links! And the laugh re supporting Ma Kaw! :wink2:
Unfortunately, our weather at the moment is more supportive of tearing a wheel off than riding! :crying2:
If you get to ride, have fun!!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
58 Posts
Discussion Starter #31
Doing great. . With the Pitbull it will be very stable.
When I was pushing the wheel forward to loosen up the chain, the Pitbull was rolling forward. Hence a block in front of the front wheel and another in front of one wheel of the Pitbull. :serious:


Hope to get the wheel/new tire back tomorrow, and early enough I can tackle getting it back on... Friday is supposed to be decent riding weather! :grin2:

Love learning and doing new things! :nerd:
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,535 Posts
Same thing happened to me. I used a dead blow hammer to get the wheel all the way forward. Once you have your chain aligned and tensioned BEFORE YOU TIGHTEN THE AXLE. You will probably want to put a shop rag , bent penny screw driver tip something. At 12:00 then rotate the wheel clockwise until you get your"tensioner " to 3:00. Otherwise the wheel may try to slide back and tighten up on you.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
58 Posts
Discussion Starter #33
Same thing happened to me. I used a dead blow hammer to get the wheel all the way forward. Once you have your chain aligned and tensioned BEFORE YOU TIGHTEN THE AXLE. You will probably want to put a shop rag , bent penny screw driver tip something. At 12:00 then rotate the wheel clockwise until you get your"tensioner " to 3:00. Otherwise the wheel may try to slide back and tighten up on you.
Yep, last time I adjusted my own chain, I was later told it was way too tight... realized I hadn't secured the chain position before tightening the axle nut... hope to remember that step in future! :serious:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
58 Posts
Discussion Starter #34
Well, got 'er done! I was a little anxious that I might have trouble getting the axle bolt back in, just in terms of having enough hands to support the wheel at the right position, see when it was lined up, and have another hand to slide the bolt into position. But necessity is a mother, they say... turns out in the right situation 2 hands and a knee is a good substitute for 3 hands!... 2 hands to support the wheel, and a knee to slide the axle home... boom! :)


Overall, the job was easy enough... I wouldn't hesitate to do it again! Thanks to forum members for support and tips!
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Need a new rear tire and debating attempting to take the wheel off myself. Read the shop manual and it seems do-able, except the part that says "remove chain from sprocket"... Being a newbie to working on my bike (have done oil change, adjusted chain), not sure if I have to break the chain to move it aside, or if it will in fact be loose enough to simply lift off and move to the side as the manual implies? And will I be able to get the chain back on when re-installing the wheel? Keep in mind, I'm an independent-minded woman, but my muscles sometimes let me down. :frown2: Is this a job reserved for the he-man?
When you take the axel out there's plenty of play in the chain.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
691 Posts
I wouldn't take the rear sprocket off. This forms part of the total mass of the wheels rotation when they balance the new tyre. In therory the sprocket bolts are meant to be replaced after removal but I've been reusing mine after using high strength loctite. 8,000+ km with no issues.
I usually include the axle spacers both sides and run cable ties around the wheel and through the centre to keep everything together during transport.
Have fun fitting the wheel and axle back into position with the brake assembly. That job can either take 2 minutes or 30. I've had to walk away to cool down before.
Now I use a wheel chock to ramp the wheel up and back to pull it into position so I can wriggle the axle through again. Sitting behind the bike with legs either side is easiest.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Well, got 'er done! I was a little anxious that I might have trouble getting the axle bolt back in, just in terms of having enough hands to support the wheel at the right position, see when it was lined up, and have another hand to slide the bolt into position. But necessity is a mother, they say... turns out in the right situation 2 hands and a knee is a good substitute for 3 hands!... 2 hands to support the wheel, and a knee to slide the axle home... boom! :)


Overall, the job was easy enough... I wouldn't hesitate to do it again! Thanks to forum members for support and tips!
Your tread looks exactly like what I just replaced my rear tire with.
 
21 - 38 of 38 Posts
Top