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Discussion Starter #1
Need a new rear tire and debating attempting to take the wheel off myself. Read the shop manual and it seems do-able, except the part that says "remove chain from sprocket"... Being a newbie to working on my bike (have done oil change, adjusted chain), not sure if I have to break the chain to move it aside, or if it will in fact be loose enough to simply lift off and move to the side as the manual implies? And will I be able to get the chain back on when re-installing the wheel? Keep in mind, I'm an independent-minded woman, but my muscles sometimes let me down. :frown2: Is this a job reserved for the he-man?
 

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Easy. Loosen the axle, then the chain adjusters til you can pop the chain off the sprocket. Mark where they are first.
Or, you can find & remove the removable link, which has an e-clamp locking one side of the chain link in place. Have fun.


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Discussion Starter #3
Duh! That makes sense!!! Loosen the chain!!! Thanks Warrbucks!!!
I'll do it that way, but since you mention it, I was told stock/factory original chains don't have a removable link?
 

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Can I ask why take the rear wheel off yourself and not let the dealer do it? The only reason I would even attempt it is if I wasn't able to bring the entire bike in.
 

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You will need paddock stand and spools, a 22mm socket and tourque wrench and 27mm wrench or socket.
Raise rear end on paddock stand.
Remove the axle nut cap and remove cotter pin 4x40mm for reference mark position of adjusters relative to swingarm.
Loosen adjuster lock nuts on each side and slide wheel forward.

Chain now has plenty of slack to slide to side of gear.

Loosen and remove castle nut and remove abs sensor(put in safe location)and bolts holding rear caliper on(not caliper bolts).

Support the weight of the tire with your legs and remove axle; take note of number and position of spacers.

Lower wheel to ground Making sure to pull chain to side and you will have to pivot tire to the left and remove from the right to clear fender.

Remove axle gear with impact before taking to shop.

Or “man” up and use tire spoons
(Motion pro steel with bead breaker work well)









Saddle up and feel the wind in your Helmet! ATGATT
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Can I ask why take the rear wheel off yourself and not let the dealer do it? The only reason I would even attempt it is if I wasn't able to bring the entire bike in.
$30 to mount tire if wheel off bike; $100 if bring in whole bike.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Remove axle gear with impact before taking to shop.

Or “man” up and use tire spoons
(Motion pro steel with bead breaker work well)
Thanks Texasnurse for the detail around clearing the fender! But axle gear? with impact? Sounds like shop talk... please translate!


Thank you!
 

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Thanks Texasnurse for the detail around clearing the fender! But axle gear? with impact? Sounds like shop talk... please translate!





Thank you!


Sorry rear sprocket; should balance better without that on too


Saddle up and feel the wind in your Helmet! ATGATT
 

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"Can I ask why take the rear wheel off yourself and not let the dealer do it? The only reason I would even attempt it is if I wasn't able to bring the entire bike in."

Why even read this post if you ask that question?
The whole point is to learn, share, help out, and SAVE money!
 

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Check YouTube for a video. Lots of great videos to help on there. I do just about all my own mechanic work on all my vehicles and I use YouTube ALOT!!
 

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"Can I ask why take the rear wheel off yourself and not let the dealer do it? The only reason I would even attempt it is if I wasn't able to bring the entire bike in."

Why even read this post if you ask that question?
The whole point is to learn, share, help out, and SAVE money!
To be fair, I don’t think everyone realizes how much the dealer charges for some of these services or that there’s even an associated charge. I come from a car background primarily, and every time I’ve gotten tires mounted to wheels, it was the same cost whether the wheels were on the vehicle or in my trunk.

I didn’t even ask the question, but I definitely learned something new about motorcycle service today.
 

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"Can I ask why take the rear wheel off yourself and not let the dealer do it? The only reason I would even attempt it is if I wasn't able to bring the entire bike in."

Why even read this post if you ask that question?
The whole point is to learn, share, help out, and SAVE money!
Not sure why me asking a question got you all in a tither. Not everyone is mechanically inclined and not everyone is looking to pinch a penny. Helping out - yes. Sharing -yes (I noticed that you didn't do either). Should I check with you before I read any more posts?
 

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simple

I'm an independent-minded woman, but my muscles sometimes let me down. Is this a job reserved for the he-man?
just a little slow first time. will go MUCH faster second time. Texas Nurse hit the most needed items. the chain adjusters will take 12 mm open end wrenches. I also recommend front and rear stands unless you're gonna take it to the dealer for the front tire. you are gonna want to make sure the chain is lined up before re-tightening the axle. I always take off the chain guard first thing. the allens with the ball on the end helps alot. On the chain alignment I usually eyeball it but will check with the Motion Pro chain alignment tool. The only issue I have had is that the chain will tighten again as you tighten the axle nut. The are small tools that you can put behind the rear of the rear sprocket and the chain to hold the axle forward. some members here mentioned that they used a shop rag or screw driver tip. I folded a penny over and used that ( soft metal). I always try to take photos of what I am working on before and during disassembly ( I m old with a poor memory:devil2: good luck :grin2:
 

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Discussion Starter #16
I'm an independent-minded woman, but my muscles sometimes let me down. Is this a job reserved for the he-man?
just a little slow first time. will go MUCH faster second time. Texas Nurse hit the most needed items. the chain adjusters will take 12 mm open end wrenches. I also recommend front and rear stands unless you're gonna take it to the dealer for the front tire. you are gonna want to make sure the chain is lined up before re-tightening the axle. I always take off the chain guard first thing. the allens with the ball on the end helps alot. On the chain alignment I usually eyeball it but will check with the Motion Pro chain alignment tool. The only issue I have had is that the chain will tighten again as you tighten the axle nut. The are small tools that you can put behind the rear of the rear sprocket and the chain to hold the axle forward. some members here mentioned that they used a shop rag or screw driver tip. I folded a penny over and used that ( soft metal). I always try to take photos of what I am working on before and during disassembly ( I m old with a poor memory:devil2: good luck :grin2:
Thanks for the encouragement, Bearslayer!
I love my pitbull rear stand (though I have to drive the rear wheel up onto a block to give myself enough leverage 'cuz o' those wimpy muscles o' mine! :wink2:)... was thinking I might have to just buck up and take it to the dealer when it was time for the front tire, as I'm not sure I want to spend the bucks for the stand in the manual that needs the exhaust removed in order to use! But I could maybe get into a pitbull front stand! Thanks for the inspiration!
Chain alignment? Meaning side-to-side, in line with the front sprocket? I'll have to study up on that, too. Thanks for the tips! I should probably use the photo strategy as well! :crying2:


Thank you all for your suggestions, help, and encouragement!!! :star: Much appreciated!
 

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Nah Ms Amie-J

(though I have to drive the rear wheel up onto a block to give myself enough leverage 'cuz o' those wimpy muscles o' mine!

It ain't the muscles , its the lack of leverage that us less tall people ( with less long arms:grin2:) have , and in your case lack of weight. I use a beveled 2X4 also. Another trick that I learned the hard way . Put a small foot stool under the rear brake side foot peg or better yet ( what I have now) a bolted to the floor ride on wheel chock. It is VERY tricky at 5'2" to hold the bike with one hand maneuver the Pitbull with the other while leaning over the seat to make sure that you are lined up with the spools. Of course when changing the front tire I revert to the small foot stool under the peg to keep the scooter from hitting tip point. :devil2: post a pic eh. :grin2:
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Check YouTube for a video. Lots of great videos to help on there. I do just about all my own mechanic work on all my vehicles and I use YouTube ALOT!!
Ooo yah! :grin2: Checked out a couple of youtube videos… now I'm thinking maybe I can even mount and balance the new tire myself! :female-fighter:
 

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Discussion Starter #19
(though I have to drive the rear wheel up onto a block to give myself enough leverage 'cuz o' those wimpy muscles o' mine!

It ain't the muscles , its the lack of leverage that us less tall people ( with less long arms:grin2:) have , and in your case lack of weight. I use a beveled 2X4 also. Another trick that I learned the hard way . Put a small foot stool under the rear brake side foot peg or better yet ( what I have now) a bolted to the floor ride on wheel chock. It is VERY tricky at 5'2" to hold the bike with one hand maneuver the Pitbull with the other while leaning over the seat to make sure that you are lined up with the spools. Of course when changing the front tire I revert to the small foot stool under the peg to keep the scooter from hitting tip point. :devil2: post a pic eh. :grin2:
I like the idea of a little insurance on the right side! It is a tricky maneuver alright! :sweat:
 
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