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Discussion Starter #1
has anyone relocated the tstat and rad filler cap for a sportster tank fit? There's a bunch of crap in the way and just wondering where people who've swapped tanks have put these. thanks
 

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BOTM Winner, April 2015
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The t-stat can be mounted a little towards the front from the original location by cutting and using the existing hoses.
The frame tabs will have to be cut off so the sportster tank can sit on the frame.
 

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as long as you can access it for filling while the tank is on, then its fine. The nipple is the overflow. It should be connected to the overflow tank behind the engine.
When you fill the system, fill it to the very top of the filler.
Then run the engine with the cap off till it gets warm and you can see the fluid surge when you blip the throttle. If it doesnt surge, theirs an air block. try squeezing all the hoses to make the air block move.
Top it off to the very top, so when you fit the cap, a small amount will over flow.
Then make sure the overflow tank is 1/3rd filled.
 

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BOTM Winner, April 2015
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With the tabs removed from the backbone the tank will sit right in.
The coil is fine and will clear the tank.

The tstat hose will be in the way though. Separate the tstat housing and turn the bottom half towards the front. That will give a different angle and the long hose will clear the tank.
 

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With the tabs removed from the backbone the tank will sit right in.
The coil is fine and will clear the tank.

The tstat hose will be in the way though. Separate the tstat housing and turn the bottom half towards the front. That will give a different angle and the long hose will clear the tank.
Sal, tell him to get rid of the damn thing. (lmao)
 

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BOTM Winner, April 2015
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Noooooo SunnyBob !!! That'll start a whole new debate like the old "which oil is better" or the "Seafoam" threads.. lol
Some folks swear that by removing the tstat your engine will go KABOOM !!!
 

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Its bizarre isnt it? people still change oil at 3000 miles when the book tells them 7000.

Yet leave brake fluid in there for 15 years when the book tells them its crap after 3.
Any harley owner rebuilds the top end every 40,000 miles which hasnt been needed in over a quarter century.
People believe that synthetic oil is best, despite every can stating "designed for high revving multi cylinders at over 12,000 rpm, when the 1500 vulcan is limited to 5.750 and even the 800 tops out under 8000.

I have owned 6 vulcans over a 18 year period, 2 x 800, 1 x 1500 classic, 1 x 1500 nomad (10 years on that one) and 1 x vn400 .
I have never used synthetic, always changed oil AFTER 7000 miles, once at 10k on my nomad.
I have removed the stat from every single one of them as soon as practical, and ridden in many 5 hour long parades without a single engine hesitation and without having to fit a parade switch or replace a clutch.
I'll repeat that, NEVER had an engine breakdown, EVER.

But then again, therell be someone along to tell me I'm the lucky one. (roflmfao)

Sorry, been a while since I had a rant, i feel much better now.
Let the wars commence.

(can you tell I'm missing my vulcan?)
 

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With the tabs removed from the backbone the tank will sit right in.
The coil is fine and will clear the tank.

The tstat hose will be in the way though. Separate the tstat housing and turn the bottom half towards the front. That will give a different angle and the long hose will clear the tank.
Could the thermostat be removed completely and just connect the hose from engine to radiator?
 

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yes. You dont need the thermostat unless you ride in very cold temps. If you do, the engine wont get properly warm.
There is no need of the stat in any normal or hot weather.

 

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yes. You dont need the thermostat unless you ride in very cold temps. If you do, the engine wont get properly warm.
There is no need of the stat in any normal or hot weather.
Right on, thank you sir. What is considered really cold temps? It's in the garage unless its atleast 40F here in Charlotte, NC.
 

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I would consider cold as needing your mouth and chin protected from wind chill.

I have removed all thermostats from my bikes for 15 years, and ridden down to cold rain, and occasionally sleet in the wind without any problems.
I dont ride if theres a likelihood of snow.

I've also ridden in 4 hour parades and 100 degree heat, also without a single problem.

But you still need a filler cap with an overflow pipe to connect to your tank. That is vital to stop heated water blowing your system
 

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I would consider cold as needing your mouth and chin protected from wind chill.

I have removed all thermostats from my bikes for 15 years, and ridden down to cold rain, and occasionally sleet in the wind without any problems.
I dont ride if theres a likelihood of snow.

I've also ridden in 4 hour parades and 100 degree heat, also without a single problem.

But you still need a filler cap with an overflow pipe to connect to your tank. That is vital to stop heated water blowing your system
So i'll need someone to weld a 1/4 nipple to the tank?
 

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No, look closely at my pic. Thats a filler cap from a 4 cylinder honda I scavenged from a breakers yard. See the small overflow tube running from it?

You have to have a filer cap with a normal radiator pressure cap. Thats a given, you can not have a sealed system without a pressure relief cap.
That filler tube and cap SHOULD have an overflow nipple fitted to it. That small tube has to be connected to your liquid overflow tank thats behind the engine.
If you dont have an overflow fitted, every time the engine gets hot, water will flow out of that nipple and it will be lost. Just like autos from the '50s, and you will have to be constantly checking levels.
When you fill the whole system, make sure you also put liquid into that tank, to about a 1/4 full.

When the engine heats the liquid, the liquid expands past the pressure cap, down the tube and into the tank. When the engine cools, the liquid is sucked back into the radiator.

The filler cap MUST be the highest point of the system other wise you will get air bubbles and thats a bad thing.
When you start the engine for the first time, leave the filler cap off and watch the water flow. Each time you blip the throttle the water should surge. If not, you have an air bubble and will have to squeeze the big tube several times to get it to move.

You can safely run the system without the cap on, untill you start to see faint whisps of steam. Then you must shut down otherwise the system will throw very hot water all over the place.
 

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anyone see anything wrong with this? also whats the nipple on the top left of the tstat for?
Im really sorry if I bump an old thread but I have the same things in mind for my VN800 so I post in this thread. Regarding this picture, wont this be a problem since the tubes are not connected as they were? The upper connection on the thermostat should go to the radiator and the lower one should go to the engine. If you switch place on them doesent that mean that the thermostat will never open since the coolant isnt "hot enough" or is it OK to switch place on these hose?
 

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Welcome to the forums!

Please fill in your profile to include your bike/location info and that
is easier using a PC vs the app. This will help others answer questions you may ask knowing what year and model bike you have.
 
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