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Make sure whoever installs your tires will install that size on your bike if you order it yourself. Most will, but some will not install anything that is not approved by the mfg.

If you are doing it yourself, just be aware that it will be more difficult to get on and especially to get off than the recommended size.
 

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Make sure whoever installs your tires will install that size on your bike if you order it yourself. Most will, but some will not install anything that is not approved by the mfg.

If you are doing it yourself, just be aware that it will be more difficult to get on and especially to get off than the recommended size.
I removed and installed both front and rear wheels myself and saw no noticeable difference with the new tires install. Don't concern yourself......the difference is negligible
 

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I removed and installed both front and rear wheels myself and saw no noticeable difference with the new tires install. Don't concern yourself......the difference is negligible
I'm sure that depends on your equipment and experience. I don't know what equipment or experience you have changing tires, but I can assure you that, for some, the MCII is much more difficult to change on the rear than a Bridgestone and probably any other 170/70 tire.

I've even seen posts on other forums about cutting MCIIs off the rear rim because they were so difficult to remove. I had another Voyager rider over to change his MCIIs for new ones and we ended up cutting one bead on the rear tire in order to get it off after fighting with it (both of us together, not just me) for several hours.

For the record, I have the Harbor Freight setup. It's cheap and I got what I paid for, but it was all I could justify at the time. The mount/demount bar sucks! I've also only changed tires twice. I'm sure it will be much easier to do the rear with MCIIs once I get a better bar (NoMar or similar) and more experience.
 

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I'm sure that depends on your equipment and experience. I don't know what equipment or experience you have changing tires, but I can assure you that, for some, the MCII is much more difficult to change on the rear than a Bridgestone and probably any other 170/70 tire.

I've even seen posts on other forums about cutting MCIIs off the rear rim because they were so difficult to remove. I had another Voyager rider over to change his MCIIs for new ones and we ended up cutting one bead on the rear tire in order to get it off after fighting with it (both of us together, not just me) for several hours.

For the record, I have the Harbor Freight setup. It's cheap and I got what I paid for, but it was all I could justify at the time. The mount/demount bar sucks! I've also only changed tires twice. I'm sure it will be much easier to do the rear with MCIIs once I get a better bar (NoMar or similar) and more experience.
I'm not a professional tire tech who has changed millions of tires of every size and type on every vehicle ever made, however, I do change my own tires on my VV. I've changed the Brigdstone and MCIIs. Can't say as I saw much difference in the difficulty level. Maybe the MCII's sidewall is a little stiffer, IDK. Now, here comes the big BUT, I use the No-Mar mount/demount bar with the HF tire changer. Makes it a lot easier than with the junk bar that comes with it. The bead breaker leaves a little to be desired but with a small length of 2x4 placed under the tire, it gets the job done. I had the HF balancer also but found that to be junk too. I got the TUSK precision balancer. Does an excellent job. Even with the HF balancer dead lever the bar would walk to one side or the other and contact the uprights when the tire was rotating. And yes, I did replace it with a straight one. Doesn't happen with the TUSK. Has a built in bubble level that makes it easy to get it level. Now, I sure all the tire experts will jump in here with all the technical what nots and the ins and outs of tire changing but I'm just giving my experience with doing the job myself. I'm sure others will and have had different experiences. :laugh2:
 

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It's not the NoMar bar's fault and I too almost broke my tip. You need to use the 4 spoon method as the tires are just too stiff. Look at their videos for Goldwing tire mount (there is 2x) for demo.

I'm sure that depends on your equipment and experience. I don't know what equipment or experience you have changing tires, but I can assure you that, for some, the MCII is much more difficult to change on the rear than a Bridgestone and probably any other 170/70 tire.

I've even seen posts on other forums about cutting MCIIs off the rear rim because they were so difficult to remove. I had another Voyager rider over to change his MCIIs for new ones and we ended up cutting one bead on the rear tire in order to get it off after fighting with it (both of us together, not just me) for several hours.

For the record, I have the Harbor Freight setup. It's cheap and I got what I paid for, but it was all I could justify at the time. The mount/demount bar sucks! I've also only changed tires twice. I'm sure it will be much easier to do the rear with MCIIs once I get a better bar (NoMar or similar) and more experience.
 

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I'm not a professional tire tech who has changed millions of tires of every size and type on every vehicle ever made, however, I do change my own tires on my VV. I've changed the Brigdstone and MCIIs. Can't say as I saw much difference in the difficulty level. Maybe the MCII's sidewall is a little stiffer, IDK. Now, here comes the big BUT, I use the No-Mar mount/demount bar with the HF tire changer. Makes it a lot easier than with the junk bar that comes with it. The bead breaker leaves a little to be desired but with a small length of 2x4 placed under the tire, it gets the job done. I had the HF balancer also but found that to be junk too. I got the TUSK precision balancer. Does an excellent job. Even with the HF balancer dead lever the bar would walk to one side or the other and contact the uprights when the tire was rotating. And yes, I did replace it with a straight one. Doesn't happen with the TUSK. Has a built in bubble level that makes it easy to get it level. Now, I sure all the tire experts will jump in here with all the technical what nots and the ins and outs of tire changing but I'm just giving my experience with doing the job myself. I'm sure others will and have had different experiences. :laugh2:
I'm sure the No-Mar makes a big difference. Do you use a No-Mar Yellow Thing, or do you find that you don't need anything like that?

I went with Dynobeads instead of trying to balance the tires.
 

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Big fan of dynamic balancing here... I was using Dyna Beads for awhile but have since moved to .060 stainless beads.
Dyna Beads are ceramic and they pulverize after a period of time. The stainless may deform but so far no issues.

I have a the HF set up bolted to my garage floor and I use one of the NoMAr style bars as well and then a specific tire lube.
I've don car tires with the combo and yes it is work but so are the hours that it takes to have a dealer do it and it's really not
all that hard.

gb
 

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I'm sure that depends on your equipment and experience. I don't know what equipment or experience you have changing tires, but I can assure you that, for some, the MCII is much more difficult to change on the rear than a Bridgestone and probably any other 170/70 tire.

I've even seen posts on other forums about cutting MCIIs off the rear rim because they were so difficult to remove. I had another Voyager rider over to change his MCIIs for new ones and we ended up cutting one bead on the rear tire in order to get it off after fighting with it (both of us together, not just me) for several hours.

For the record, I have the Harbor Freight setup. It's cheap and I got what I paid for, but it was all I could justify at the time. The mount/demount bar sucks! I've also only changed tires twice. I'm sure it will be much easier to do the rear with MCIIs once I get a better bar (NoMar or similar) and more experience.
Invest in some good long Tire spoons/iron bars and lots of soapy water and keep Tire bead soapy wet/slippery,will help a lot.

Sent from my SM-G930V using Tapatalk
 

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I have a homemade bead breaker. It's not pretty.
In fact, it's downright ugly and clunky, but it has never failed to break a tire down yet.

I also have three Motion Pro tire irons and a few from the local farm center. I use plastic strips cut from shampoo bottles, or detergent bottles, made from HDPE, tough stuff for protecting the rims.

I typically use Ajax brand dish soap for demount/mount. Have also used Dawn, but have discovered Ajax doesn't seem to freeze as easily as Dawn. The Dawn actually gets milky colored, but the Ajax stays clear. Sure makes for cold digits, though!

I am about due for a new rear tire, as well, and have been looking at either another Metzeller ME888 (what is currently mounted. I have no idea the total miles on it, but I have ridden 7500 on it since last November), or the Michelin Commander II in a 180/65-16. There is no clearance issue with the taller Michelin, is there?

Any experience with an Avon rear? I am looking for longevity, as I ride 20-25k miles per year. I would also consider the E4 if reviews here were favorable.

Thanks! Ron
 

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Invest in some good long Tire spoons/iron bars and lots of soapy water and keep Tire bead soapy wet/slippery,will help a lot.

Sent from my SM-G930V using Tapatalk
I have 3 long spoons, 3 short spoons, rim protectors, etc. and use Murphy's Tire Lube. It is mostly the HF mount bar and the extra width of the MCII. My friend and I used all of the spoons and the mount bar on his rear tire.

Murphy's is da bomb! Without it, we would never have gotten that tire on. Better, even with my small air compressor, I can seal all around the rim with it and pop a bead on very quickly as done in this video...

 
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