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In the 10 years I rode my VN900 I changed out the rear tire 4 times. Each time I had the same problem putting the wheel back on. I never worked out a solution. I just struggled each time, then when it was complete, I forgot all about it.
Here’s the problem. The only thing that holds the brake caliper bracket on is the axle. But the axle goes in from the other side of the bike. So I would get everything precariously lined up, lower the bike gently down to line up the holes and start sliding the axle through. About half way through the bracket would slip out of place and I couldn’t get it back without pulling the axle out and starting over. Usually it would take me 4 or 5 tries before everything stayed put and the axle slid through.
Well, I replaced the rear tire on my Vaquero for the first time yesterday. When I took the wheel off to take it to the shop, I realized I was going to have the same problem. At 2:00 am yesterday morning, I finally figured it out. For those that already worked it out, I gave myself good, hard dope slap when I was done.
With everything still removed, I placed the bracket on the frame. I located a socket that had about the same O.D. as the axle and slipped it into the bracket, pushing it far enough in that it also sat in the frame. I used a zip tie to lock the bracket to the frame and, like magic, everything slipped right into place the first time. I can’t believe I didn’t figure this out years ago! Now to see what kind of mileage I get out of this Shinko 777.
 

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When I change the rear tire on my Voyager I use a zip-tie to secure the brake caliper holder it in place. I discovered that little trick on the first change 60,000 miles ago and it's served me well ever since.
 

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I have zip tied that bracket to the frame with 2 zip ties. I do not remove the ties, just leave them tied to the frame.. It works great.
 

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Having given myself the same good hard dope-slap, there are two things I can't figure out...

1. Why I didn't work this out for myself, despite many, many wheel on's & wheel off's, much cursing, many skinned knuckles.

2. Why no one thought to share this excellent idea until now. Pilot you should be ashamed of yourself... 60,000 miles you've kept this secret?
 

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This is a real "duh" moment! I've removed/installed my rear tire 3 times now, and I had help the last 2 times. Even with the extra pair of hands that bracket is a challenge. Thanks for sharing that tip. I'm sure that'll make it a bunch easier.!!!
 

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Having given myself the same good hard dope-slap, there are two things I can't figure out...

1. Why I didn't work this out for myself, despite many, many wheel on's & wheel off's, much cursing, many skinned knuckles.

2. Why no one thought to share this excellent idea until now. Pilot you should be ashamed of yourself... 60,000 miles you've kept this secret?
I guess I have to apologize. It was such a no brainer I just assumed most people could figure it out on their own. And yes I know what happens when you assume.:grin2: I put the shaft in on that side so I get it in the exact position, then use a heave duty zip tie to hold it there while I put the shaft in from the other side. I don't leave the zip tie on there though because that bracket slides back and forth when you're adjusting the belt tension and I don't want any more resistance than necessary when I'm adjusting it. I read a lot of tips and tricks on here and I know how everyone swears that their method is the best and only one to use. I find a lot of them aren't all that there claimed to be but some are good though. So, I just keep things to myself. :smile2:
 

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I guess I have to apologize. It was such a no brainer I just assumed most people could figure it out on their own. And yes I know what happens when you assume.:grin2: I put the shaft in on that side so I get it in the exact position, then use a heave duty zip tie to hold it there while I put the shaft in from the other side. I don't leave the zip tie on there though because that bracket slides back and forth when you're adjusting the belt tension and I don't want any more resistance than necessary when I'm adjusting it. I read a lot of tips and tricks on here and I know how everyone swears that their method is the best and only one to use. I find a lot of them aren't all that there claimed to be but some are good though. So, I just keep things to myself. :smile2:
Here's a little tip for you then... I've not had to adjust my belt tension in years.

Whenever I remove the wheel, I just take the shocks off and then just lift the bike until the wheel can be rolled out underneath. Just before the swingarm reaches it's lowest position, the belt will slacken right off without the adjusters needing to be loosened.

So therefore, when I use this trickery of yours next time - I will zip-tie the bracket in place before I remove the wheel, and snip it off when it's re-installed.
 

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Here's a little tip for you then... I've not had to adjust my belt tension in years.

Whenever I remove the wheel, I just take the shocks off and then just lift the bike until the wheel can be rolled out underneath. Just before the swingarm reaches it's lowest position, the belt will slacken right off without the adjusters needing to be loosened.

So therefore, when I use this trickery of yours next time - I will zip-tie the bracket in place before I remove the wheel, and snip it off when it's re-installed.
I tried that once. Too much hassle for me. I prefer to adjust the belt each time. Only takes 3-4 minutes. And It makes it easy to make sure that the wheel is still square to the swing arm. I just set the deflection to about 1/2 - 3/4 in. Or about 12-19 mm. And yes I know what the book says. The geometry of the belt changes slightly as the swing arm moves up and down riding down the road.. therefore the deflection or tightness if you will, is constantly increasing and decreasing slightly. That technique seems to be working quit well for me with this bike and for the Triumph I had before. Just one other thing. I don't know how we ever got along before zip-ties came along.:grin2:
 
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