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I bought and installed one of those units and it lasted about a week before I ripped it off.
Bulky, clumsy, a source of leaks and just a general pain.

Purchase a zero loss pump with gauge and that is all you need for a once a year pressure check/inflation (providing there is not a leak). They can be had at any bicycle shop, among other places.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I guess mine may be leaking then, I gotta adjust em every month. Also, I change the pressure based on load (full bags, wife on the back or empty)
 

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I bought mine thinking that it was a good idea.
What it did is make something more complex than it needed to be.
 

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As an add, if you do not have a zero loss pump, using anything else makes it look like you have a leak when there really is none.
 

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The air balance kit works fine if its installed correctly. I had it on my nomad for 10 years and it never failed. The reason so many did fail was the tiny air tubes were sliced with knives, and the ends not smoothed over. The ragged tube ends scored the fitting o rings, and it leaked forever
But that kit is no longer made. You can get parts from a hydraulic store, and even adapt a harley balance kit.
I had the balance kit and a gauge permanently on the nomad for at a glance readings.

you MUST use a zero loss pump. if not, as you disconnect you will lose all of the tiny amount of air thats in there.
you MUST NOT use a power pump. Theres way too much pressure way too quick, youll destroy the seals and the air shocks.

Actual pressure depends on riding style. A skinny solo rider on good roads can get away with zero.
A 200 lb plus solo should have a bout 15lbs.
2 x 200 plus riders with luggage should have the maximum of 43lbs. DO NOT EXCEED 43 lbs. The shocks will lock up and you will have no suspension.

while youre adjusting the air, you need to rotate the rebound numbers too.
1 is very soft rebound for light loads and good roads.
4 is for heavy roads with bad surfaces.

As a starting guide, a 200lb rider with occasional passenger (not too heavy) around town would use 15 -20 lbs and spring 2.
IT IS VITAL that you remember that the spring collars rotate opposite ways. check the numbers. if you set them on different numbers, your road holding is shot.
 

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The air balance kit works fine if its installed correctly. I had it on my nomad for 10 years and it never failed. The reason so many did fail was the tiny air tubes were sliced with knives, and the ends not smoothed over. The ragged tube ends scored the fitting o rings, and it leaked forever
But that kit is no longer made. You can get parts from a hydraulic store, and even adapt a harley balance kit.
I had the balance kit and a gauge permanently on the nomad for at a glance readings.

you MUST use a zero loss pump. if not, as you disconnect you will lose all of the tiny amount of air thats in there.
you MUST NOT use a power pump. Theres way too much pressure way too quick, youll destroy the seals and the air shocks.

Actual pressure depends on riding style. A skinny solo rider on good roads can get away with zero.
A 200 lb plus solo should have a bout 15lbs.
2 x 200 plus riders with luggage should have the maximum of 43lbs. DO NOT EXCEED 43 lbs. The shocks will lock up and you will have no suspension.

while youre adjusting the air, you need to rotate the rebound numbers too.
1 is very soft rebound for light loads and good roads.
4 is for heavy roads with bad surfaces.

As a starting guide, a 200lb rider with occasional passenger (not too heavy) around town would use 15 -20 lbs and spring 2.
IT IS VITAL that you remember that the spring collars rotate opposite ways. check the numbers. if you set them on different numbers, your road holding is shot.
Thanks sunnybob that is exactly what I was looking for.
 
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