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Discussion Starter #1
We bought a 2005 1600 Nomad last week and I've downloaded a pdf of the owner's manual. In it, it says to use "RON 95" octane. WHAT??

What do y'all use in these bikes?
 

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IMHO, if you stick with the premium grade of fuel, marketed as 91 octane, both here and stateside, you will be just fine. Some of the stations offer 94 octane for a higher price than the "regular" premium grade and I have not noted any difference or improvement in performance. I'm sure that someone will soon chime in and state that their bike runs just fine on regular octane gas (85). My choice is to stick with what the book says and I have never had an issue with gas performance. I have thrashed my bike all through western Canada and the NW States.

As always, YMMV

Cheers!

Mike
 

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Interesting,
In Germany, 95 is the lowest quality you can get.
The manual also requires only 5% Ethanol, so I can't buy the cheap E10 stuff.
 

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Hi SilvrT,
Without getting into the chemistry and the mechanical aspects of the 1600 engines, the simple answer is to use as high an octane that is available at the pump.
These bikes are tuned to run extremely lean to get past the EPA regulations/restrictions.
The lower octanes cause preignition or pinging under load which may cause damage to your engine.
It may be audible to you or maybe not when you’re riding but suffice it to say that it’s bad.
After adding a Doebeck/Wiseco fuel management system, my engine no longer suffers from pre-ignition, however my fuel mileage suffers with lower octanes so I still run premium fuel.

Hope this helps.
Luckymann77
 

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Interesting,
In Germany, 95 is the lowest quality you can get.
The manual also requires only 5% Ethanol, so I can't buy the cheap E10 stuff.
Europe and the US use different systems for octane numbers, and just to make it dazzlingly incomprehensible, there are three different ratings.

Basically, there's RON, MON, and PON -- Research Octane Number, Motor Octane Number and Pump Octane Number. The US uses PON while (at least most of....) Europe uses RON.

According to the e-tuners site:

If a fuel is 98 RON then it will be 93 PON -> 93 PUMP
If a fuel is 95 RON and 87 MON then it will be 91 PON -> 91 PUMP
 

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Interesting,
In Germany, 95 is the lowest quality you can get.
The manual also requires only 5% Ethanol, so I can't buy the cheap E10 stuff.
Octane has nothing to do with fuel quality; it's simply a measure of the fuel's resistance to preignition.
 

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Europe and the US use different systems for octane numbers, and just to make it dazzlingly incomprehensible, there are three different ratings.



Basically, there's RON, MON, and PON -- Research Octane Number, Motor Octane Number and Pump Octane Number. The US uses PON while (at least most of....) Europe uses RON.



According to the e-tuners site:


US uses RON+MON/2



Saddle up and feel the wind in your Helmet! ATGATT
 

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ALSO, and a lot will not believe it, the octane rating has NOTHING to do with you MPG number.
As stated above - "it's simply a measure of the fuel's resistance to preignition."

So no it will not make your engine run smoother, or cooler, or increase/decrease your mpg.
If you think one or more of the above happens, fine put it in you tank.
But there is no science to back up your claim.
 
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