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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Last fall I encountered a problem with the rear pulley having a very noticeable wobble. Took it to dealer where the rear hub was replaced. Solved for the meantime. Itz back. Wondered if anyone has encountered similar prob. Dealer had to order new hub from overseas due to the fact it appears to b unusual and did not have stock here. Any input appreciated. '09 custom
 

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Last fall I encountered a problem with the rear pulley having a very noticeable wobble. Took it to dealer where the rear hub was replaced. Solved for the meantime. Itz back. Wondered if anyone has encountered similar prob. Dealer had to order new hub from overseas due to the fact it appears to b unusual and did not have stock here. Any input appreciated.
Mine has the same problem was told this was normal somehow i think they are wrong
 

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Is your guys pulley attached right to the wheel or is it sort of free floating with rubber between the pulley and wheel?

Like on my Vulcan 800 my sprocket has a cushion of rubber between the sprocket and wheel.
 

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Well, fellas....You're NOT alone in this problem.....I've replaced the bearings and had the housing machined to accept a double race bearing which I figured would fix the problem....NOT!! I bought a second wheel and had the same problem...I discussed this with a buddy who is a machinist(same guy who did the bearing) and he has the wheel to do his magic on. Now, here's what he "figures"...If you remove the cushs and the "O" ring and place the pulley housing over the coupling there is a noticeable amount of lateral play. So..as I understand, the hub portion of the wheel is too small and needs to be bigger so the lateral movement is diminished.....We haven't had much more discussion BUT I believe he's going to mill wheel hub and put a ring on to build the inside shoulder up, then cut it to be just a bit smaller(.002mm??) than the inside of the pulley coupler....Replacing the O-ring with a new one won't take the play out because its function is to keep water out of the bearing and coupler....IF what he suggests does the trick I'll post to let you guys know.....I've been driven nuts with belt chirp and wobble since I had tires replaced..Why Kawasaki designed this drive system like that is beyond me. I've had chain driven machines forever and have never experienced drive wobble until I got this machine!!
 

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Got my wheel back from the shop today.....Here's the scoop.....The pulley coupler was too big for the wheel receiver by about 0.17 inches. Thats almost a quarter of an inch. In other words with the cushes removed and the coupler in place, there was lateral movement of almost 0.2 inches...Doesn't sound much does it. Here's the "fix?"...the coupler was milled and a ring was inserted. The inside diameter of that ring was then milled to be about 0.025 of an inch bigger than wheel receiver. Now you have to remember that there is a rubber O ring that acts as a seal to keep water out of the coupler bearing......however.....that O ring serves a "bushing" as well, centring the coupler when assembled and installed on the wheel. When that O ring wears it loses it ability to keep the coupler centred and the coupler tends to tip IF you disassemble, to replace tires or do other maintenance where the rear wheel is removed. So, now that the ability of the coupler is removed it "should" run true when assembled.....
 

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Got my wheel back from the shop today.....Here's the scoop.....The pulley coupler was too big for the wheel receiver by about 0.17 inches. Thats almost a quarter of an inch. In other words with the cushes removed and the coupler in place, there was lateral movement of almost 0.2 inches...Doesn't sound much does it. Here's the "fix?"...the coupler was milled and a ring was inserted. The inside diameter of that ring was then milled to be about 0.025 of an inch bigger than wheel receiver. Now you have to remember that there is a rubber O ring that acts as a seal to keep water out of the coupler bearing......however.....that O ring serves a "bushing" as well, centring the coupler when assembled and installed on the wheel. When that O ring wears it loses it ability to keep the coupler centred and the coupler tends to tip IF you disassemble, to replace tires or do other maintenance where the rear wheel is removed. So, now that the ability of the coupler is removed it "should" run true when assembled.....
This is a great write-up, thanks. Just to clarify, in your last sentence are you refering to the removal of the excessive lateral movement?
"So, now that the ability of the coupler to have excessive lateral movement is removed it "should" run true when assembled....."
 

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Absolutely. While the coupler will still have some movement(you would have to fuse it to the wheel to remove it all), that should be very little and keep the pulley aligned. Because there is a single race bearing, in the hub -- well your's anyway -- I had mine milled and a double race bearing installed -- there are enough forces to push the pulley out of true. The only thing stopping that with the stock set up is the rubber O ring, and as i said, as the O ring wears the flex increases. Having only a couple thousandths in clearance prevents this. I haven't mounted this yet, but in theory it should work..... If you get the wheel off your bike and remove the pulley, remove the crushes, and then set the pulley in place you see what I mean with the lateral movement as it will slide from side to side. The key is to diminish that movement to keep pulley in the same axial plane. Threading the axle through and torquing down to spec will keep it from moving any more....I'll post an up date when I get this completed and checked....
 

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Thanks for the feedback. I look forward to your report after you're back on the road. I can't see anything wrong with what you did. The dampers are still there to absorb the torque and smooth things out. Would you think the flex you experienced was from the single bearing in the final drive flange and the movement between the inner race (fixed to the axle) and the outer race fixed to the flange? If not, where's the movement coming from once the wheel is mounted and the axle, with spacers, are in place? I see on the microfiche that there's a snap ring to hold the bearing in the flange. When you installed your bearings where they a press fit or did they just slip in followed by the snap ring?
 

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Hey Sojourner.....Well we have "SUCCESS" and a radial run out of about 0.02 mills, which "could" be attributed to pulley thickness(casting) or very minor wear on the pulley shoulder that the belt rides against........Quite the difference from the 1.5 to 1.75 mm run out I experienced before...When you assemble, "don't" tighten the belt before you have tightened the axle nuts to pull everything in. Back it off a slight amount and then tension the belt, but NOT as tight as Kawasaki does.....there is so much force there that you'll tear up the bearings, IMHO... I also trimmed about a 1mm off the tits on the cushs.....You mentioned the circlip in the hub.......When I had this done, a cut was made to deepen the bearing seat about 1mm. I don't recall the depth of the double race bearing, however if memory serves me correct, I think its about 2mm. Deepening the bearing seat will afford you to take 1mm off the clip shoulder and keep the bearing from moving, but I think that the fit is enough to do that......very tight. With this set up you can use the original seal , and as well, you can use a compound or sealant to act as a glue if you're concerned the seal will be displaced. I put about 5000km on since I had the pulley done previously and haven't noticed any movement. The other thing you have to keep in mind is the spacer or bushing inside the coupling will have to be milled shorter(where it meets the bearing race) by the same amount that the bearing is recessed, ie. 1mm+/-, AND a new bushing made or the stock bushing shortened by the height the bearing sits above its original stock position, ie 1mm+/-. This keeps the actual length of the wheel assembly, under torque, between the swing arms...... I realize this might be somewhat complex to understand but if you have "mechanical" mind you'll grasp the concept pretty quick. And there it is...After about year or so of using various types of "temporary" fixes I think this will do quite well. :cool:
 
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