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I was taking the float out of the carb to check the float needle, and when I was taking the pin out, one of the pin holders broke off. I do not have another 300-500 for another carb, when I've already put a bunch of money into fixing this bike already. Is there a way to fix this? I've got a few thoughts running through my head, such as super glue, soldering it back on, seeing if it'll stay put with just one pin holder... Any suggestions? I'd really love to finally ride this thing someday. Thanks!
 

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If soldering does not work. I have used JB Weld on a lot of small and large parts with good results.
 

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I was taking the float out of the carb to check the float needle, and when I was taking the pin out, one of the pin holders broke off. I do not have another 300-500 for another carb, when I've already put a bunch of money into fixing this bike already. Is there a way to fix this? I've got a few thoughts running through my head, such as super glue, soldering it back on, seeing if it'll stay put with just one pin holder... Any suggestions? I'd really love to finally ride this thing someday. Thanks!
KAWASAKI OEM CARB FLOAT SET 95-05 VULCAN 800 16031-1089 | eBay
 

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I was taking the float out of the carb to check the float needle, and when I was taking the pin out, one of the pin holders broke off. I do not have another 300-500 for another carb, when I've already put a bunch of money into fixing this bike already. Is there a way to fix this? I've got a few thoughts running through my head, such as super glue, soldering it back on, seeing if it'll stay put with just one pin holder... Any suggestions? I'd really love to finally ride this thing someday. Thanks!
Show it to a professional welder guy. He should know exactly if it can be sold or not.
 

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Soldering is NOT for strength, it for electrical things.
JB weld, or similar is your best bet.
I have a different opinion, soldering is also for strength. Definitely you will not have the same strength as the material from which is made the carb, but you can have more that enough strength to hold the float.
The key is to ask the right person.
 

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You CAN NOT solder the aluminum! Even welding is hard. Even it could be welded, first somebody should determine what is the exact aluminum (alloy) type. Different alloy types require different welding techniques.
If You ask me, what would I do, my option would be to drill a little hole (from the top) in that broken leg which is left and make a thread in it. I would screw a screw in it and drill a hole in that screw (according that pin size). Or simply I would use a screw like this.
 

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Yes, is difficult, but :

What I would do : as I said, I would ask a specialist.

I have welded two broken clutch levers so far with no issue. And the clutch lever is not at all easy to weld. Of course, the strength of welded area is less, but enough to pull the clutch.
One of this two levers is from my wife's VN800 and this were years ago, no issue so far.
 

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Motorcycle carbs are subject to a lot of vibration, so a glue type repair might fail and it will fail 200 miles from home, at night, in the rain.
 

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Soldering is NOT for strength, it for electrical things.
JB weld, or similar is your best bet.
I have a different opinion, soldering is also for strength. Definitely you will not have the same strength as the material from which is made the carb, but you can have more that enough strength to hold the float.
The key is to ask the right person.
Soldering is usually defined as using a filler metal that melts below 450°C. I think what both of you are thinking about is brazing which is done at a much higher temperature. If it is done well and with the correct materials, it can be very strong, though not as strong as welding. If you don't do it right, though, it will create a really crappy bond or no bond at all.
 

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I would definitely not try to braze it. Gas impregnated aluminium will not braze very well. If you could steam clean the area, you might be able to braze it, but any organic residues in the metal will make nearly impossible, even with flux. If you can get it welded, that would be the best choice IMO. JB Weld may or may not hold up when in constant contact with gas.
 

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Welding cast aluminum is difficult due to oxidation


Get out there and feel the wind in your Helmet! ATGATT
Difficult, but not impossible. My dad welded cast aluminum all the time and that was with TIG equipment from 45 - 50 years ago when it was still known as heliarc welding. Prep is key. Pre-heating also helps. You have to clean it, heat and weld immediately before any significant oxidation can take place.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Thanks, guys! I think I'll try that JB, sounds like that should do it.

The reason I was checking the float needle is because the bike's running like crap, and when I put the petckock to "PRI" (as a test), gas comes flowing out of the carb. That's gotta be the float needle, right?

Thanks!
 

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Hi Johnny , Is it a brass float or a plastic one ? If it's brass stick it in a cup of boiling water & look for AIR coming out of the float then get your soldering iron out & fix if it's plastic then yes it's the float needle !
Hope this helps Steve
 

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If You are still up for JB Weld, it would be great idea to put a small pin (dowel or miniature stick) inside that connection. Sure, it will be a little bit of drilling in both broken sides, but it wold be like surgeons sometimes connect broken bones with titan sticks inside them. It will prevent any side movements.
 

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If You are still up for JB Weld, it would be great idea to put a small pin (dowel or miniature stick) inside that connection. Sure, it will be a little bit of drilling in both broken sides, but it wold be like surgeons sometimes connect broken bones with titan sticks inside them. It will prevent any side movements.
If you can get the pins to line up right that would be great. Or you can just carefully drill some small holes where the piece will connect and fill with JB weld then on the surface your connecting, sort of like a root canal.
 

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Yes, is difficult, but :

What I would do : as I said, I would ask a specialist.

I have welded two broken clutch levers so far with no issue. And the clutch lever is not at all easy to weld. Of course, the strength of welded area is less, but enough to pull the clutch.
One of this two levers is from my wife's VN800 and this were years ago, no issue so far.
I agree a good welder can braze weld the piece and it can be stronger than it was.
 
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