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Discussion Starter #1
Hi fellow V2K riders!

Y'know, I've been reading a lot of posts lately, and everyone seems to want "more performance" out of their V2K. I guess it's not surprising that people who buy the "biggest stock displacement V-twin" are a performance-minded group. It's also not surprising that with a hundred horses and eight-hundred some-odd pounds, our Vulcans are somewhat disappointing performers. So we end up with all sorts of "air kits", "fuel controllers", "dyno runs", "which exhaust will give me fill in the blank?"... on and on and on. Usually, to no avail.

So here is some heartfelt, sincere advice:

Quit it.

Seriously.

Just stop.

Living happily with a V2K is about accepting what it is. If you don't like it, there are many other bikes out there that can fulfill your desires. You will be much happier changing rides than trying to make the Vulcan a performance machine.

The root of the problem is a lack of exactly what you are all asking for. Support. Has anyone done any development on this engine? As far as I have found, no. Without that development time, you are shooting in the dark looking for performance.

This may be blasphemy on this site, but if you want a platform with ample aftermarket performance support and zillions of hours of race engine development, you need a Harley. Example: look for performance cams for your vulcan on-line. Then look for performance cams for a Harley. Look for anything else: high-flowing, big-valve heads, big-bore kits, pistons, crankshafts etc.... See? There is NOTHING THERE for our V2K's, and anything you could want for a Harley. You can buy a complete engine that puts out as much horsepower as you want, from several suppliers, for your Harley. 140, 160, 180 hp? No problem. These are serious performance engines with a LOT of development time behind them. Bolt them into any one of a dozen lightweight frames, and you have a bike that will walk away from a V2K with ease, as well it should for what it cost.

When you buy a V2K, the stock engine is what you are basically stuck with, unless you bolt on a turbo or nitrous, which will take your bike out of the street category most of us want to ride in.

I have dramatically improved the HANDLING of my V2K by cutting a ton of weight off of it, which has made it much more enjoyable for me, but the engine is, and will remain, stock. I'm even running the stock air box and exhaust, with some super-light, straight thru slip-ons. Without opening up the intake, the exhaust does nothing but save weight.

So get a Busa to keep your V2K company, and when you need speed, ride that. Even those $45,000.00 "Harley's" won"t mess with you then.
 

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Why the rant? Just tired reading of people chasing their tails in pursuit of power? :)

The Hyabusa is a good suggestion, but I have an SV1000S with a handlebar kit myself. I just love the sound of a sport twin cylinder exhaust.

What you need to realize is when people go after performance for a street ride most of us just really want better throttle response. All the normal mods really just set the parameters back to factory design before all the noise and emissions compromises are made.

It's just fun to make our toys just a bit better.
 

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It's just fun to make our toys just a bit better.
Quote of the year right there!


O.. for the record.. they DID indeed make aftermarket cams for our bike.

DID is the key word.

2010 was the last year they produced the V2K. There is less and less of them "out there". As less are being used and "modded", you will find less and less aftermarket parts being created.

There is already a lot of stuff you can't buy anymore. Like the cams.
 

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The Hyabusa is a good suggestion, but I have an SV1000S with a handlebar kit myself. I just love the sound of a sport twin cylinder exhaust. It's just fun to make our toys just a bit better.
rdd,, SV1000. most best favorite bike motor ever. had a nekid 04. canyon carver. if only they put that motor in a more comfy chassis I could sit on and ride all day.. thats where the mods come in.. making something more,, mine.

doomers is rite about the v2k being fine as is. he like many wanted to push it into superbike status. it wont ever go there cuz its a behemoth and its dna is a tractor. a fun tractor but still will pull a 7 point plow.
best mods are the ones that make yor bike yours and not another bolt/add on copy.
 

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You could get an overblown overpriced Harley...

Or you could get a cruiser that comes pretty damn badass stock and will mod up to 240+ HP without needing a rebuild @ 40k.

The Triumph Rocket III Touring is one of the most comfortable forward control cruisers I've ridden.
A 20 dollar cable, free tuning software and an hour or so of your time will put a stock R3T at around 115 hp and 140 ft-lbs.

Now, if you really want to chase that power bug.
Carpenter Racing has a 240 hp (close to Ponch's superbike refrence)kit you can wrench on for under $4k.
Making for a $21k performance cruiser.

Of course if I was going to take Ponch's advice on the personalization mods; I would start with the Roadster. Which is a fire breathing dragon out the door!

Scott
 

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rdd,, SV1000. most best favorite bike motor ever. had a nekid 04. canyon carver. if only they put that motor in a more comfy chassis I could sit on and ride all day.. thats where the mods come in.. making something more,, mine.

doomers is rite about the v2k being fine as is. he like many wanted to push it into superbike status. it wont ever go there cuz its a behemoth and its dna is a tractor. a fun tractor but still will pull a 7 point plow.
best mods are the ones that make yor bike yours and not another bolt/add on copy.
My SV has the Banditmania handlebar conversion, Corbin seat like yours had, and lower pegs from a Buell as comfort mods. Performance side are Blueflame dual outlet stainless slip ons, ATRE with gear indicator, pair valve removed, K&N, 1/5 turn throttle, EFI controller, race tech springs, upgraded rear shock, and stainless lines with Vesrah pads.
I've also had 2 TL1000S (modded pretty extensively), one TL1000R, and a DL1000. So you can see I like the Suzuki twins. :)
The heavily modded 97 TLS I had basically converted the throttle into a front wheel elevation control and with the added compression it sounded like a low flying helicopter at idle. I miss that one a lot. Never should have sold it, it made the SV feel like a bicycle.
 

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I can see this from both sides of the fence here. I can see wanting to make it your own and put your personal flair to it. I can see pipes to make some noise and change the "appearance" of your bike. I can see doing performance mods to you bike, but we have to keep a realistic outlook on our goals. No matter what you do to a cruiser, it's still a cruiser. We can make them fast, but fast for a cruiser.

I had a 2K. I loved it for what it was and hated it for what it was too. Loved raw power you got from a factory motor, all the torque you would ever need with a passenger and load. Loved the looks and size of it, but I also hated the fact it ATE tires and scrubbed pipes (and I actually scrubbed my frame a few times) so easily. I wanted a touring bike with a fairing (voyager, Electraglide,...) type bike. So if I started throwing hardbags, heaving fairing,... stuff on it to make it heavier then those problems just keep getting worse. If I had the funds and time, I would have stripped it down to a frame, motor, gas tank, and seat, then added a bike. Could not make it happen so I chose to ditch the 2K.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Rant was not intended. My intent was that if someone searches "performance modifications" they would get some info. that might prevent another V2K with $2000 in mods that makes 3hp less than stock.
 

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Hi Doomer

I fro one thought you made sense. I might not totally agree, but your words, at least for the pocket, make the expense to get a couple of hp a little silly. I'm a little silly sometimes. LOL
But, I just keep adding weight and slowing the big girl down.

Enjoy You Rides
Enjoy Your VK2
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Rocket III

You could get an overblown overpriced Harley...

Or you could get a cruiser that comes pretty damn badass stock and will mod up to 240+ HP without needing a rebuild @ 40k.

The Triumph Rocket III Touring is one of the most comfortable forward control cruisers I've ridden.
A 20 dollar cable, free tuning software and an hour or so of your time will put a stock R3T at around 115 hp and 140 ft-lbs.

Now, if you really want to chase that power bug.
Carpenter Racing has a 240 hp (close to Ponch's superbike refrence)kit you can wrench on for under $4k.
Making for a $21k performance cruiser.


Of course if I was going to take Ponch's advice on the personalization mods; I would start with the Roadster. Which is a fire breathing dragon out the door!

Scott
Checked out Carpenter Racing's site. Pretty cool. The Rocket is really unique - has sort of a steampunk look to it. 240 hp. should make for an interesting ride to say the least.

Just about anything will get you more bang for the buck than a Harley. It seems that Harleys have become rich boys toys instead of the greasy rebel biker image they used to have.

As I've gotten a little more experience riding motorcycles (over 40 years riding now) I've gotten to where I can enjoy the V2K. After much lightening, that is. 820 lbs. is too much for a motorcycle IMO.
 

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I like the V2K for what she is and isn't. Added a trunk, modded the seat to relieve pressure on the tailbone, put a fairing and electricals on. Changed the pipes to gain ground and bag clearance, but went back to the stock air box. I will keep the PCV for spark control. I can ride long distances, which is what I wanted: a bike which doesn't work hard at all, and is stable over the long haul. Heavy? Yeah. That is what she is. She's mine.
 

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I like the V2K for what she is and isn't. Added a trunk, modded the seat to relieve pressure on the tailbone, put a fairing and electricals on. Changed the pipes to gain ground and bag clearance, but went back to the stock air box. I will keep the PCV for spark control. I can ride long distances, which is what I wanted: a bike which doesn't work hard at all, and is stable over the long haul. Heavy? Yeah. That is what she is. She's mine.
Why the reverse to the stock airbox?
 

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Discussion Starter #14
stock airbox

Funny how aftermarket manufacturers of air filters and exhaust systems play games in their advertising with this. One guy says his air filter flows three times as much as the stocker but doesn't require any EFI mods to run just fine. The other guy says the same thing about his pipe.

What they don't mention is that since intake and exhaust are connected, that super flowing air filter won't pass any more air than the stock exhaust can pass, so no EFI changes because airflow through the system hasn't changed.

If more fuel is not required, it's because no more air is going through and thus no more horsepower is being made.

Nothing significant that the stock EFI map can't handle anyway.

More power requires more fuel. Fiziks.

But no matter what, there are always people who think that if you put an air scoop on a Clydesdale it will run faster because now it can breathe better.
 

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I changed the exhaust to gain some sound and lots of clearance plus the weight loss. I wanted to do something with the air box cover, but the curvature makes that difficult. Found the K&N, which is perfect for personalized artwork. Got the PCV so I could tune it and not burn up the engine. Unfortunately I could never get to the dyno. There aren't any base maps for 2-1 with the K&N, so she was running really lean. So I bumped the fuel percentages, trying to get things right, but Was worried about damage from incorrect mixture.

As it is, the performance increase, if any, was hard to spot. I was outrunning hardleys before, it just looked cooler. The fuel mileage dropped way off. I figure ignition advance is reason enough to use the PCV, so I will figure out another way to dress up the air box.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
No dyno

One way around the problem you ran into with developing your own map is with an air/fuel mixture gauge. I have the Innovate Motorsports kit which comes with the gauge and wideband O2 sensor. The stock header on an O2-equipped V2K has the sensor bung on the crossover pipe, so that's where I'll weld in the bung that came with the A/F gauge kit. You need a tach as well. Then you need to mark your throttle in 10% intervals and make note of the RPM, throttle position and A/F ratio as you ride.

The gauge supports data logging, but I haven't used it yet. The data logger should record these three parameters for you so you can play them back and adjust your PC map accordingly. But riding around with a laptop in your saddlebag and a cable hanging around might be more trouble than its worth. It will take some riding and recording the data one way or another, but you should be able to zero in on a pretty good map. It will likely be different than a dyno tune because you are tuning A/F ratio to real-world riding, rather than for max hp., but you should end up close to max hp. by tuning A/F ratio, and will definitely be in safe operating range.

I'm doing this because: 1) fun for me to play with this kind of stuff. 2) I want the freedom to fab/change exhausts and intakes for styling reasons, as you said.

I just want to know that the A/F ratio is safe with whatever I bolt on as far as intake or exhaust goes, not interested in max power.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Pcv

The PCV won't work on the older V2K's according to Dynojet. There may be some way of hooking one up, but they only list the PCIII for pre 2008 bikes, and the PCIII does not have the autotune option. I looked at that since I have the PCV on my ZX-14 and it works perfectly, but according to what I found, it won't work on a 2006 V2K.

Again, there might be some simple mod to get it to work that I'm not aware of. It would definitely simplify the process.

PCV and autotune is also pricey - over $600 I think. The A/F gauge and a simpler fuel controller can cost significantly less.
 

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The autotune is an option. I want one, but want the dual channel.

The mixture gauge might be a good fallback, have not looked into that. Mainly cause the only ones I am familiar with are too big for mobile use.

As for performance, there WAS a drop going back to stock air box. The time needed for hard acceleration over a known distance increased, as did the time to reach a speed level. I do not have numbers for the change, but it is obvious after a couple of rides.

I would not call it significant, but it would be measurable.
 

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The PCV won't work on the older V2K's according to Dynojet. There may be some way of hooking one up, but they only list the PCIII for pre 2008 bikes, and the PCIII does not have the autotune option. I looked at that since I have the PCV on my ZX-14 and it works perfectly, but according to what I found, it won't work on a 2006 V2K.

Again, there might be some simple mod to get it to work that I'm not aware of. It would definitely simplify the process.

PCV and autotune is also pricey - over $600 I think. The A/F gauge and a simpler fuel controller can cost significantly less.

Nope, no mod can do that.

I have an 04 V2K.. so stuck with the PCIII.

On a side note, for those who a PCIII, they should check the firmware on it.

I bought my bike new in March of 05 (a left over from previous year, huge discount from dealer to buy it instead of an 05).

The Power Commander was bought at the same time. Meaning it is a decade old.

Anyways.. I installed a Power Commander LCD Unit earlier this year.

It's really spiffy.

But..I had to update my the PCIII's firmware. It turns out, there has been a decade of updates for it.

The updates made a HUGE difference. It really did.
 
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